Twitter Facebook RSS Feed Print
Daily Dose

Sleep

1:30 to read

Bedtime routines are very important!  Many kids are getting up earlier and earlier for some sort of practice (often before the sun comes up) so going to bed on time makes everyone in the house wake up in a better frame of mind and mood for the day ahead.   

 

Bed time battles are typical for a toddler who has learned to ask for “one more book”, or for the elementary school child who swears “they are not tired” but who falls asleep during bath time.  But who knew there would be even more battles with teens and their electronics??

 

Numerous studies have shown that electronics disrupt sleep.  But, trying to convince your adolescent son or daughter that they need more sleep is a daily struggle. While the studies on sleep recommend that teens get between 8 to 9 hours of sleep, most teens are not even close to that!  (90% report less than 9 hours).

 

During the summer teens keep all sorts of crazy hours and many get the majority of their sleep during what we would consider to be “daytime” hours…as they go to bed at 2 or 3 am and sleep past noon.  So, the minute that school resumes after summer vacation they already have sleep issues trying to “re-adjust” their biological clocks…and then you throw in the use of electronics right before bed and you have the perfect storm for sleep deprivation and daytime fatigue.

 

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine found that “adequate sleep duration on a regular basis leads to improved attention, behavior, learning, memory, emotional regulation, quality of life and mental and physical health”.  There isn’t a parent around who doesn’t want happy, rested, studious and healthy kids…of all ages. If you throw in less moodiness for teens who get more sleep most parents would sign their teens up on the spot.

 

Why do we all need to disconnect from electronics in order to have better sleep?  That blue light from the electronic screen…of any shape for or fashion works against sleep. It signals the brain to suppress melatonin secretion, which is the hormone that makes us get sleepy at the end of the day. The light from the screen also confuses the brain of it being daytime and increases alertness which may delay sleep…even after turning off the screen.

 

Try this new family rule, parents included, that all screens (phones, tablets, computers) will be off and docked outside of the bedroom at least 30-60 minutes prior to bedtime. While your teen may insist that they won’t use the phone, it is often too tempting to not “cheat” once you are in your own room and asleep. 

 

While this may initially be hard to enforce, once it is the family routine it becomes less of a battle. Everyone will have an easier time falling asleep and staying asleep, and maybe get a few more hours of “shut eye”.    

 

 

Your Teen

Is Technology Sabotaging Teen's Sleep?

2:30

For the first time in history, we have adolescents that have never known an age without cell phones, tablets and computers. These marvels of technology have been a part of their lives from birth and they spend an extraordinary amount of time engaged with them. 

All their texting, posting and web surfing is robbing teens of the much needed sleep they need to think and function clearly, according to a new study.

Experts say teenagers need at least nine hours of sleep a night to be engaged and productive during the day. Anything less can cause daytime sleepiness and interfere with school or daily activities.

How much sleep is today’s teen actually getting? Researchers analyzed a pair of long-term, national surveys of more than 360,000 eighth- through 12th-graders to find out.

One survey asked 8th-10th- and 12th-graders how often they got at least seven hours of sleep. The other asked high school students how long they slept on a typical school night.

In 2015, 4 out of 10 teens slept less than seven hours a night. That's up 58 percent since 1991 and 17 percent more than in 2009 when smartphone use started becoming more mainstream, the researchers said.

"Teens' sleep began to shorten just as the majority started using smartphones. It's a very suspicious pattern," said study leader Jean Twenge, a psychology professor at San Diego State University.

The more time students reported spending online, the less sleep they got, according to the recent study published in the journal Sleep Medicine.

Teens that were online more than five hours a day were 50 percent more likely to be sleep-deprived than classmates who limited their time online to about an hour.

Studies have shown that the light emitted by smartphones and tablets can interrupt the body’s natural sleep –wake cycle.  The bright light can make the brain think that it’s daylight and time to stop producing melatonin, a hormone that cues to the body to sleep. By disrupting melatonin production, smartphone light can disrupt your sleep cycle, almost like an artificially induced jet lag. That makes it harder to fall and stay asleep.

If smartphones, tablets and computers are one of the causes for teens’ sleep deprivation, experts agree that moderate use can help change that. Everyone -- young and old alike -- should limit use to two hours each day, the researchers advised in a San Diego State University news release.

It’s not only the light from smartphones that can disrupt your ability to fall asleep, but the content you’re reading. Social media has a way of pulling teens into a discourse or “following” marathon that can eat up those precious hours of rest.

The best solution for electronic sleep deprivation is to make sure your teen puts his or her phone away and shuts down the tablet or computer at least an hour before bedtime.

Story sources: Mary Elizabeth Dallas, https://teens.webmd.com/news/20171020/smartphones-screens-sabotaging-teens-sleep

Kevin Loria, Skye Gould, http://www.businessinsider.com/how-smartphone-light-affects-your-brain-and-body-2017-7

Daily Dose

Kids Who Snore

1.30 to read

Does your child snore?  If so, have you discussed their snoring with your pediatrician.  A recent study published in Pediatrics supported the routine screening and tracking of snoring among preschoolers.  Pediatricians should routinely be inquiring about your child’s sleep habits, as well as any snoring that occurs on a regular basis, during your child’s routine visits.  

Snoring may be a sign of obstructive sleep apnea and/or sleep disordered breathing (SDB), and habitual snoring has been associated with both learning and behavioral problems in older children. But this study was the first to look at preschool children between the ages of 2-3 years.

The study looked at 249 children from birth until 3 years of age, and parents were asked report how often their child snored on a weekly basis at both 2 and 3 years of age.  Persistent snorers were defined as those children who snored more than 2x/week at both ages 2 and 3.  Persistent loud snoring occurred in 9% of the children who were studied.

The study then looked at behavior and as had been expected persistent snorers had significantly worse overall behavioral scores.  This was noted as hyperactivity, depression and attentional difficulties.  Motor development did not seem to be impacted by snoring.

So, intermittent snoring is  common in the 2 to 3 year old set and does not seem to be associated with any long term behavioral issues. It is quite common for a young child to snore during an upper respiratory illness as well .  But persistent snoring needs to be evaluated and may need to be treated with the removal of a child’s adenoids and tonsils.

If you are worried about snoring, talk to your doctor. More studies are being done on this subject as well, so stay tuned.

Tags: 
Your Baby

FDA Warns that “Sleep Positioners” Are Dangerous for Infants

2:00

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a warning to parents and caregivers of infants about the dangers of using sleep positioners. The products are also known as “nests” or “anti-roll” supports.

The two most common sleep positioners include two raised pillows or "bolsters" attached to a mat. Babies younger than 6 months old are placed on the mat between the pillows to keep them in a specific position while they are sleeping. 

But putting babies to sleep on or near soft objects, such as positioners, toys, pillows and loose bedding, increases the risk for accidental suffocation and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says. 

Some babies have been found in dangerous positions next to a positioner they had been placed in for sleeping. Federal officials also reported that infants have died after being placed in one of these products. In most cases, the infants got out of position, rolled onto their stomachs and suffocated, the FDA explained.

The FDA and infant heath experts say that babies should always be put to sleep on their backs on a firm, empty mattress, preferably in a crib.

Babies should never sleep with a positioner, pillow, blanket, sheets, a comforter or a quilt, the FDA advised. Appropriate clothing keeps babies warm enough while they are sleeping.

Some sleep positioner companies claim that their products prevent SIDS. But the FDA noted it has never cleared an infant sleep positioner that promises to prevent or reduce the risk of SIDS since there is no scientific evidence to back up this claim.

Some of the companies also promote their products as helpful for easing gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a condition that causes stomach acids to back up into the esophagus. Others suggest their positioners help prevent flat head syndrome (plagiocephaly), a deformation caused by pressure on one part of the skull.

While it’s true that the FDA has previously approved some of these products for GERD and flat head syndrome, the government agency has asked these companies to stop marketing these items because it feels that the risks outweigh the benefits.

Every year about 4,000 infants die unexpectedly while sleeping due to suffocation, SIDS or another unknown cause, according to the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

The FDA urged parents and caregivers to talk to their child's doctor if they have questions about how to make sure their baby sleeps safely.

Story source: Mary Elizabeth Dallas,  https://consumer.healthday.com/kids-health-information-23/sudden-infant-death-syndrome-sids-news-643/sleep-positioners-a-danger-to-baby-fda-727180.html

 

Daily Dose

A Better Night's Sleep

1:15 to read

What is it about sleep and parenting? Babies never sleep enough and teenagers sleep too much!! Why can’t “we” get this right? While sleep patterns definitely do change with the age of the child, good sleep habits can begin in infancy and continue throughout adolescence.

Even from the beginning,  you should try to teach your child to fall asleep on their own and to self-console by either sucking on their fingers or a pacifier. But remember, this sleep thing is new and babies really do have to learn how to do this.  Think of it as if you were teaching your child to read, it doesn’t happen overnight, but evolves with practice, patience and repetition. Sleep is the same way.

After the early years of teaching your child to fall asleep on their own, the toddler, preschool, and elementary years are usually fairly easy to establish good sleep patterns if you follow a routine, with a set bedtime, reading to your child before bed and hugs and kisses and lights out. This is the age for occasional nightmares, or fears, but also for regular nights of uninterrupted sleep.

With the tweens and teens and hormone changes of adolescence comes a new sleep clock that is set to stay up too late and not wake up in the morning. Even teens need a good nights rest, so a bedtime should be encouraged and enforced unless there is a test of special event. There is not a reason I can think of for teens to be up past 11 pm on a school night, homework should be finished, and all of the accessories such as cell phone, computer and all other electronic gear put up before bed. The older you get the more you understand a good night’s sleep , but someone has to teach the basics along the way and before you know it the whole house will be on that schedule too. That's your daily dose for today.  We'll chat again tomorrow. Send your question to Dr. Sue now!

Your Child

Study: Bedtime Routine Offers Kids Many Benefits

1:45

If your child doesn’t have a nightly bedtime routine, he or she is missing out on a tremendous amount of health and behavioral benefits according to a new study. And you’re not alone.

A multinational study consisting of over 10,000 mothers from 14 counties reported that less than 50 percent of their infants, toddlers and preschoolers had a regular bedtime routine every night.

Researchers determined that the participant’s children who did have a regular bedtime routine benefitted on many levels. The study found that children with a consistent bedtime routine had better sleep outcomes, including earlier bedtimes, shorter amount of time in bed before falling asleep, reduced night waking, and increased sleep duration. Children with a bedtime routine every night slept for an average of more than an hour longer per night than children who never had a bedtime routine. Institution of a regular bedtime routine also was associated with decreased sleep problems and daytime behavior problems, as perceived by mothers.


“Creating a bedtime routine for a child is a simple step that every family can do,” said principal investigator and lead author Jodi Mindell, PhD, professor of psychology at Saint Joseph’s University and associate director of the Sleep Center at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. “It can pay off to not only make bedtime easier, but also that a child is likely to sleep better throughout the entire night.”

According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, positive bedtime routines involve the institution of a set sequence of pleasurable and calming activities preceding a child’s bedtime. The goal is to establish a behavioral chain leading up to sleep onset. Activities may include giving your child a soothing bath, brushing teeth and reading a bedtime story.

“It’s important that parents create a consistent sleep schedule, relaxing bedtime routine and soothing sleep environment to help their child achieve healthy sleep,” said American Academy of Sleep Medicine President Dr. Timothy Morgenthaler.


Researchers found that consistency was an important factor in helping children sleep well

“For each additional night that a family is able to institute a bedtime routine, and the younger that the routine is started, the better their child is likely to sleep,” said Mindell. “It’s like other healthy practices:  Doing something just one day a week is good, doing it for three days a week is better, and doing it every day is best.”

Mothers participated in the study by completing a validated, online questionnaire that included specific questions about their child’s daytime and nighttime sleep patterns, bedtime routines and behavior. The questionnaire was translated into each language and back-translated to check for accuracy.

“The other surprising finding is that we found that this effect was universal,” said Mindell.  “It doesn’t matter if you are a parent of a young child in the United States, India, or China, having a bedtime routine makes a difference.”

Sleep deprivation is becoming an all too common problem with today’s children and adults. The earlier a good sleep routine can be established and practiced, the better for a child in the long run.

Study results are published in the May issue of the journal Sleep.

Source: http://www.healthcanal.com/disorders-conditions/sleep/63298-study-shows-that-children-sleep-better-when-they-have-a-nightly-bedtime-routine.html

Daily Dose

Get Your Baby to Sleep!

1:30 to read

How many times can you discuss newborns and getting them to sleep? It doesn’t matter how many babies you have, the biggest issue for new parents is ”when is my baby going to sleep through the night?”.  This statement is often followed by, “I have read every book and none of it seems to be working”. “What’s the trick?”  

Over the years I have realized that there is “NOT” one way or method that makes that newborn sleep through the night.  While some babies seem to lull themselves to sleep fairly easily and are sleeping in the first 4-6 weeks, most infants still awaken during the night for the first 8-12 weeks. There are also the “difficult” infants who don’t sleep through the night until 4- 6 months. But all in all...it just takes time, patience and a bit of prayer.

So, with all of this knowledge and remembering how I longed for my own babies to sleep 8-10 hours at night, I found a new article in The Archives of Diseases and Children quite interesting and thought provoking.  

Physicians have long known that it takes some time for circadian rhythm (biological sleep patterns distinguishing day and night) to develop in babies and a study done in the UK actually looked at infant’s sleep patterns between 6-18 weeks of age. They analyzed data including the infants’ body temperature throughout the night,  length of sleep a d urine samples collected am and pm to look at cortisol and melatonin levels. They also looked at the babies’ cheek swabs for circadian gene expression.  All in all a lot of data.

The findings were interesting showing that increasing cortisol secretion at night occurred around 8.2 weeks of age, followed in the next week or two by increased melatonin at night....both integral to establishing circadian rhythm.

When they analyzed body temperature, a drop in core temperature at the beginning of sleep (again maturational) they found that this occurred around 10-11 weeks.  Lastly, mature circadian gene expression was found at about 11 weeks.

So, no matter what book you read, or what your pediatrician, best friend or your own mother tells you, it is all about those hormones starting to “wake up” and regulate sleep. 

At least you know your baby is “normal”, even when everyone on Facebook “SWEARS” that their baby slept all night in the first 2 weeks. They probably either have totally forgotten or just made it up...it is all about science after all.

Tags: 
Daily Dose

How Much Sleep?

With school back in session I keep hearing “how much sleep does my child, tween or teen need?”

With school back in session I keep hearing “how much sleep does my child, tween or teen need?” The answer is probably more than you think. Elementary age kids still need 10 to 11 hours of sleep a night, while those teens need about 8.5 hours. With all of the activities after school and then the homework load I often hear, “there just isn’t enough time to get to bed on time”. But more important than soccer, piano, or dance etc. is a good night’s sleep.

Insufficient sleep has been correlated with a multitude of issues from focusing and overall school performance, to obesity and even to further sleep related problems. But parents must believe in the importance of sleep to keep their kids on the right track. Sometimes that means dropping an after school activity in order to fit in homework, family dinner and a little wind down time before bed. It may be a tough to enforce, but one of the best parts of the day is bedtime! That’s your daily dose. We’ll chat tomorrow!

Tags: 
Play
4647 views in 2 years
Sleep

Get Your Kids to Sleep!

Pages

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

Stay healthy this flu season.

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.