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Your Teen

Most Parents Don’t Know Their Teen’s Vaccination Status

1:45

Most parents believe that they are on top of their kids’ immunizations, but that may not be true, especially where their teen is concerned.

Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that adolescents are not getting all their recommended vaccinations, however, more than 90% of parents believe that their teenager had received all vaccinations necessary for their age, according to a C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll.

“In the United States, vaccines have long been recommended for babies and at kindergarten entry; more recently, several vaccines have been recommended for the adolescent age group,” Sarah J. Clark, MPHa research scientist from the Institute for Healthcare Policy & Innovation at the University of Michigan, and colleagues wrote. “However, data from the CDC indicate that national vaccination rates are well below public health targets, particularly those that require more than one dose, such as meningitis, human papillomavirus and annual influenza shots.”

The poll focused on vaccination for teenagers between 13 and 17 and included a national sample of parents.

Most parents had reported that their adolescent child had definitely (79%) or probably (14%) had all vaccinations recommended for their age, despite 36% of parents not knowing when their child is due for their next vaccine. The rest believed their child was due for their next vaccine within the next year (19%) or in more than a year (26%). One in five parents believed their teenager needed no more vaccines (19%).

The majority of parents polled relied on information about their child’s upcoming immunizations from their doctor’s office either through an office visit, scheduled appointment or a reminder that was sent. Rarely, would a notice be sent from the school, health plan or the public health department. A large number were not aware of how to be notified about upcoming vaccinations. 

"Parents rely on child health providers to guide them on vaccines in childhood and during the teen years,” Clark said in a press release. “Given the general lack of awareness about adolescent vaccines shown in this poll, there is a clear need for providers to be more proactive for their teen patients.”

Parents can be more proactive in finding out about their teens and younger children’s immunization requirements by checking their child’s school website or calling the school. The CDC also has a website with vaccination recommendations for children of all ages, including college students at https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/index.html

The 2017-2018 school year will be here before you know it. Many schools will start up again in mid to late August. Do yourself and your child a huge favor by getting their immunizations up-to-date before the last minute rush!

Story source: https://www.healio.com/pediatrics/vaccine-preventable-diseases/news/online/%7Be6c9d80d-86d4-48a7-9090-b1e489e6db56%7D/majority-of-parents-unaware-of-teens-incomplete-vaccination-status

Daily Dose

Tummy Aches

1:30 to read

I am getting a lot of phone calls and texts with concerns about  tummy aches. I have even started seeing patients in the office with complaints of “my tummy hurts”, and we are just in the first week of school. I know that school nurses are dealing with this common complaint as well.   Amazingly, I don’t see very many complaints of tummy aches during the “lazy days of summer”…but once school starts they seem to become more prevalent.

Don’t get me wrong…while the tummy aches are real and painful, they are usually not due to anything serious.  In many cases I see,  the abdominal discomfort may be due to a bit of anxiety and stress that often comes as children get back into the classroom.  While the child may not be aware of “stress”,  their body does sense it and the gut responds with abdominal pain. 

The children that I am already seeing are all healthy and growing well. They do not appear to be “ill” when I see them, but will complain that their tummy hurts. When I have them point to where the pain is, they typically point right around their belly button (periumbilical).  If asked to point to the one place where it “hurts the most”  they typically still cannot localize it…it’s just all over! Having generalized pain is typically a good sign, rather than having point tenderness in one area.  Upon further questioning they do not have a fever, have not had vomiting or diarrhea, DO NOT wake up in the middle of the night with abdominal pain and often cannot remember if they “pooped“ today or yesterday but usually swear that their “poop” is “normal” . (I am not always sure about that - stool history in kids is quite hit and miss!) 

A few of the children say that eating makes their tummy ache worse while others report it feels better if they eat. They typically are not having issues with a specific food.  (It also depends what they are given to eat - often they will eat their favorite food if given the opportunity).  

For some of the children the pain is “bad enough” that they come home from school, but once home their parents report that after an hour or so they seem better.  Other children stay in school, but the minute a parent picks them up they start saying “my tummy hurt all day at school”!  

I remember that one of my sons often had tummy aches during the school year and we were talking about it the other night (he is now an adult).  He says he remembers being worried about school and “hiding” in the morning when it was time to go to school (I would be looking all over for him as his older brother was already out the door, and anxious that he would not get to school on time,  while I had the younger brother on my hip as I searched the house).   Talk about getting a stomach ache…mine was in knots by the time I would get to work.  It would only be several hours later when I would get the phone call from the school nurse that he was there with a tummy ache.  He now says that he remembers that by the time he was 8 years old it all just changed and it went away. 

Many times all it takes is a little reassurance that the tummy ache is not serious. I tell the children that everything on their exam is normal which is a good thing. Sometimes it seems to help a tummy ache if I prescribe the child some extra fiber and maybe a Tums  a good source of calcium too). Who knows if it is placebo effect… but just by doing something they feel a bit of relief. The one thing I do know…they need to keep going to school and it usually gets better once they are settled back into a school routine.  

 

Your Child

Time for Back-To-School Routines

1:30

It’s almost THAT time.

Many school districts will begin filling up the classrooms with new and returning students on or about the fourth week of this month.

There’s plenty to do in preparation, including immunizations, loading up on school supplies, new clothes and getting back to regular bedtime hours.

Four weeks may seem like plenty of time to get all these things done, but as you know, deadlines have a way of slipping up on us.

One way to help the family avoid sudden school-morning-shock is to start implementing bedtime hours and routines before classes begin.

Experts agree that two weeks before school begins is a good time to start easing back into the new hours.  Find out what time your child needs to be at school and work backwards to come up with a bedtime that will give them plenty of sleep.  If your child has been staying up later during the summer, you might want to adjust their bedtime by 15 minutes, then a half hour until you get to the bedtime they will use during the school year.

The Sleep Foundation recommends that kids between 6-13 years old get 9 to 11 hours of sleep at night. Teenagers can do well with a little less sleep; between 8 to 10 hours. Preschoolers need the most sleep with about 10 to 13 hours.

Mealtimes are also important. With longer daylight hours during the summer, meals often get pushed back to accompany evening activities. Shifting family mealtimes to an earlier hour can help train everyone’s biological clock to start expecting school schedules instead of the lazy-hazy days of summer.

As parents, you can expect some resistance. It happens every year as a new school year begins. Stick with the changes and your child will adapt. Kids aren’t the only ones that find it difficult to let go of summer; know that you also may have a difficult time adjusting to earlier mealtimes and setting new routines. Patience is going to be the key word for everyone as summer break transitions into school semesters.

Experts often note that routines help everyone function better together. While kids may not like them, they do need them. Kids are more likely to feel safer and know what is expected of them when there are guidelines.

One thing you can count on is that your kids will be watching you to see how you handle change. Be a good role model.

One simple way to help get everything done before school starts is to make a list of what needs to be done and create a calendar for achieving those goals. Check with your school and find out which immunizations and school supplies are needed, clothing or uniform regulations and pre-registration dates. Most schools will have all the information you need online.

There’s still time to enjoy the summer break and slip in a family vacation – August is a popular month for getaways. But, right now is a good time to create a plan for the remainder of August, and to prepare for that first school bell ring!

Daily Dose

Start the Back-to-School Sleep Routine Now

2.00 to read

Getting back into the routine of school days also means getting back to good bedtime routines.How can it be that school is just around the corner? Getting back into the routine of school days also means getting back to good bedtime routines. With that being said, you have to start the process now to ensure plenty of time to slowly get bedtimes re-adjusted. By starting early you can avoid the battles that some parent’s talk about when discussing bedtimes.

Children need a good night’s sleep to wake up happy, rested and ready to learn. Numerous studies have shown that elementary age kids need about 10 hours of sleep a night while tweens and teens still need a good 8 – 9 hours of sleep. I wonder how many children really get the recommended amount of sleep? I think too few. Unfortunately, I know from my own experience that teens seem to operate on a different sleep schedule and rarely are in bed as early as they should be. Most of us have relaxed bedtime a little during the summer and children are staying up later and sleeping longer in the mornings. This is great during the lazy summer months, when schedules are also different. But within a few weeks the morning alarms will ring forcing everyone to get up earlier to get to school. In order to try and minimize grouchy and tired children (and parents too) during those first days of school, going to bed on time will be a necessity. Working on re-adjusting betimes now will also make the transition from summer schedule to school schedule a little easier. If your children have been staying up later than usual, try pushing the bedtime back by 15 minutes each night and gradually shifting the bedtime to the “normal” hour. At the same time, especially for older children, you will need to awaken them a little earlier each day to re-set their clocks for early morning awakening. Why is it that pre-school children want to get up early, no matter what, while school-aged children are happy to sleep through alarms?  Such is life. Also, make sure that you are not only ensuring that you children get a good night’s sleep during the school year, but they also awaken in time for breakfast! Just like my mother used to say, “breakfast is the most important meal of the day’” and that adage is still true. A good night’s sleep followed by a healthy breakfast has been shown to improve mood, attention, focus and over all school performance, as well as even helping to prevent obesity. Start off the school year on the right foot. It is easier to begin with good habits than to try and break bad ones. That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow.

Daily Dose

The Homework Battle

1:15 to read

Homework is one of the least favorite exercises for both parent and child.

Homework is one of the least favorite exercises for both parent and child. I was reminded of this while helping my five and seven-year-old nephew and niece with their homework recently. It seems like yesterday since I was helping our own sons with homework, when in actuality it was many years ago. It is easy to forget the complaining, cajoling and pleading to get homework finished. But it is also an important exercise in helping your children get an organized workplace at home, to having family rules about computer and TV time before homework is finished and to teach independent study skills as a child matures.

So... trying to get my niece and nephew to settle down for homework with out getting up, trying to "sneak" back to the computer andto focus on the letter ‘N’, was a real test of forgotten parenting skills. I am not sure I was a total success. They did not want to do their homework, gave me 10 reasons it wasn’t necessary and told me "Aunt Sue you are the meanest aunt we have", which I am sure was not a compliment.

After much stalling, begging and promising "we" finished one worksheet for first grade and a Pre-K sheet glued with picture of ‘N’ words cut from catalogs (while he searched for Christmas presents for me to buy him). It was organized chaos to say the least, but it was finished! The short story is, have a set time for homework and a place for your young children to work, where they are within your sight, but also without a lot of distraction.

Try to get homework done earlier than later; it’s always harder when both parents and children are tired. Make their homework their responsibility, even from early elementary years, as it sets the stage for the rest of their years of homework. Lastly, don't ask Aunt Sue the pediatrician to help; she has "way too many rules".

That's your daily dose, we'll chat tomorrow.

Daily Dose

How To Soothe Back-To-School Jitters

1.45 to read

It is not uncommon for children to be both excited as well as apprehensive about the start to a new school year.Where has the summer gone?  Do you feel like I do and think, I blinked and POW it's back to school!  There's a lot of excitement for the new school year but some are feeling a bit nervous and anxious.

It is common for children to be both excited as well as apprehensive about the start to a new school year. Being a little worried about heading back to school is normal. Whether your child is going to the same school, but concerned about their new teacher, or starting a new school, the underlying uncertainty is normal. I can remember lying in bed the night before the first day of school and being so excited that I couldn’t sleep. I was always most excited about what “new outfit” I was going to wear. My mother had of course taken me shopping weeks before for the “back-to-school” skirt and sweater, and I just couldn’t wait to get to wear my new clothes. Back-to-school jitters are normal and should be discussed several days before school begins. It is very common for a child to have anxiety and stress related to a new school. But it is also not uncommon for children to worry about little changes related to such things as new lockers, cafeteria changes, a new teacher, or new friends. Some children will complain of tummy aches and headaches with the beginning of school. I am always reminded that I rarely hear children complain of a headache or tummy ache during summer vacations. These “aches and pains” are often a manifestation of a little underlying anxiety, and seem to be a September – June phenomena. A little parental reassurance will often help relieve those aches. The best plan for dealing with back-to-school jitters is to acknowledge the anxiety and plan on how to deal with it. Make sure that your child is rested for the first day of school and they have a good breakfast to start off the day. On the way to school discuss all of the positives for the new school year. Make your goodbyes short and sweet. Let your child know you will be there at the end of the day. Do not let your child see you upset, as sometimes parents too are anxious about the first days of kindergarten, high school or even college. Those back to school pictures are memorable and you will always like looking at the pictures with everyone smiling, even if your parental heart is a little sad at letting go. That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow. Send your question or comment to Dr. Sue!

Your Child

Setting Up a Routine for Homework

2:00

If yours is like a lot of families, you’re just not quite ready to face the homework hurdle. But like it or not, after school assignments have arrived and helping your child get into a regular routine can actually make it easier for everyone.

Deborah Linebarger, PhD, associate professor of education at the University of Iowa, has come up with six tips to help families get back in the assignment swing of things.

Be prepared: Even if you’ve already picked up all the supplies your child needs at school, make sure the staples needed to complete assignments are also available at home. Items like pencils, erasers, folders, clips, rulers, computer paper & toner should have their own space and be ready to use if needed. This is also a good time let them set up a special place in the house where they can work undisturbed and with all the supplies they need. You may discover you have a budding interior designer with a knack for organization!

Set A Schedule: You child should do her homework at the same time every day. Many kids need a break after school for a snack and a little running around first. It's best to get homework done as early as possible -- when it drags on past dinner and toward bedtime, the work is likely to take longer and be sloppier.

Bedtime: Don’t leave homework till the last minute, make sure that it’s finished and checked at least a couple of hours before bedtime. Just like adults, children need plenty of good sleep to function well the next day. Preschoolers typically need 11-13 hours each night. Six to thirteen year olds need around 9-11 hours and teens need about 8 -10 hours a night. Make sleep a priority by having a cool, quiet and dark bedroom. Establish an appropriate bedtime for your child and stick to it. Cut off the access to computers, TVS, phones and any electronics at a minimum of an hour before it’s time for sleep. Quieting and slowing down before it’s actually time to nod off can help relax your child.

Break it down. Younger kids might get a week's worth of homework on Monday to turn in by Friday. Older children may have big responsibilities like term papers and science projects. Help them break large projects into smaller steps, and make sure they start early.

Keep up with your child’s assignments so that you’re not surprised by a last minute science project the night before it’s due!

Encourage "peer collaboration" -- to a point. It may be helpful for siblings close in age to do homework together. The older one may be proud and happy to offer help to the younger one. But if they bicker more than they cooperate, it's time for separate spaces.

What if you have a child with ADHD? As you probably already know, children with ADHD are more likely to face extra challenges with completing their homework.

He or she will need even more supervision and guidance, Linebarger says.

"Start by breaking up homework into really bite-sized amounts," she says. "For a younger child, that may be only about 10-minute increments. Expand them slowly as they show they're able to handle it." And expect that your child will need you to watch her homework efforts closely to make sure he or she stays on task.

When they gets distracted -- and they will -- encourage your boy or girl to do something physical to get back on track. "Let her jump up and run around for 5 minutes, or have him do 10 push-ups or 30 jumping jacks," Linebarger says. "Research shows that acute physical activity right before a challenging mental task helps to control behavior."

Children with ADHD often hear a lot of criticism, be sure and compliment them and encourage them when they’ve completed a difficult task.

When they manage to sit still for that 10 minutes of homework, or come home with their homework folder in order, give them lots of praise for making a great choice," Linebarger says.

It won’t be long till summer is a fond memory and the school year is just how things are. You can help your child adjust to this either new or familiar way of getting through Monday through Friday by using the tips above and finding out what adjustments may need to be made to work best for your family.

Source: Gina Shaw, http://www.webmd.com/parenting/features/back-school-homework-routine

 

Daily Dose

Start Good Homework Routines Now

Now that school has started homework has too. For most children homework starts in first grade and continues through out high school. There are often lots of complaints and frustrations about getting homework completed, both from the children and their parents. Like so many things, the best way to begin the school year is with a good plan for getting homework completed.

It is also easier to start younger children with good study habits that will then be maintained throughout their school years. With that being said, do not throw in the towel if you have an older child who still needs a little coaxing and guidance on getting homework done. It is never too late to make changes for the better! To begin with homework needs to be a child’s responsibility. Parents are important helpers with homework, but should not be the doers of the homework. Everyone is a little different as to when homework should be completed. For some it is easiest to come straight home from school and start homework. For others they need some “down time” and may need to run around outside to get rid of some energy before starting homework. You know your child the best, but either way, having a routine to getting homework started is the key to getting it completed. Secondly, good study habits require a good study area. Buying an inexpensive desk to set up a quiet study area will be useful for many years. Setting up this area can be fun for children too and teach responsibility for taking care of their study area. As children get older they will be used to getting their study area organized and this will carry them all of the way through college. Teachers have set expectations for homework, and are a valuable resource in helping you as a parent to know what to expect for the year. Some teachers assign more importance to homework than others; so it is important know this early in the year. Review these expectations with your child too, so that everyone is on the same page. Homework can also be a good time to watch your child at work. This is the only time that you really have a chance to observe how your child is learning. Does it seem that they have a harder time in one area than another? Are there problems with comprehension, or focus? These parental observations are important if there seem to be consistent issues, and if so make an appointment with your child’s teacher to discuss your concerns. Again, doing the homework for them will not correct the issue and tackling learning problems is better at an earlier age. By following good homework basics your child should become independent with their homework and be on the road to a lifetime of good study habits. That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow.

Daily Dose

Back to School

1:30 to read

Schools around the country have opened their doors and some will be starting soon. This is the first week of school for most students in my area and parents have been busy in the last few days attending “back to school” and “meet the teacher” nights in preparation for a new school yea

So…every school has different rules, expectations and strategies for helping their students evolve into their “best” selves and as you get older the “rules” often change in hopes of making students more independent and responsible. I other words, getting ready for the “real world ‘ one day.

Catholic High School for Boys in Little Rock, Arkansas has recently been highlighted in the news and on social media for the sign that is posted on the entrance to the school. It reads “If you are dropping off your son’s forgotten lunch, books, homework, equipment etc, please TURN AROUND and exit the building”  Your son will learn to problem solve in your absence.”  The school posted the same message on their Facebook page as well.

According to the principal of the school, this has been a Catholic High rule for quite some time…it was also a rule at the high school my boys attended.  While some feel that this is unjust and that the students should be allowed to “phone home” if they have forgotten something, the school’s explanation is really fairly simple…allowing your child to have some “soft failures” and to learn both problem solving skills and responsibility will ultimately mold them into functioning members of society as they reach adulthood.  Sounds reasonable to me.

I know that as my boys went from elementary school, on to middle school and then high school their father and I had greater expectations that they needed to be responsible for getting their “stuff” to school.  We started off the school year with a game of sorts where you were given 3 “hall passes” for the year. I guess this started from something at school where they were given a hall pass to go to the bathroom or the office, and some teachers would hand out homework passes that allowed you to “skip” an assignment. So, each child ( this probably started in about 3rd or 4th grade) had 3 passes/year  where they could call and have us “rescue” them if they forgot something. Once you used up your “hall passes” you had to suffer the consequences of no lunch or turning in an assignment late.  Interestingly, each child was a bit different….one would use them up pretty quickly, another would “hoard” them for late in the year.  One wanted to know if they could be accrued? 

By the time they reached high school it was not a SHOCK when they were told the school rule that they could not call their parents.  It seems they figured out how to borrow money for lunch, or share with a friend, how to borrow a tie or jacket for an assembly and that turning in assignments a day late usually meant 10 points off. Not only did it help them become more organized and responsible, it also made me a working Mom “feel less guilt” that I really was not available to rescue them sometimes, even if I wanted to.  Do you think you would appreciate waiting in your pediatrician’s office (any longer than you may already) while they tried to run a homework assignment to school??  

You might try starting off the school year with a few hall passes and see if it works for your family!  

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