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Your Baby

CPSC Sues Britax Over Dangerous Jogging Strollers

2:00

In an effort to prevent children and adults from suffering further harm, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) filed an administrative complaint against Britax Child Safety, Inc., alleging that certain models of their B.O.B. jogging strollers (“strollers”) contain defects in their design which present a substantial product hazard.

The complaint charges that consumers reported stroller wheel detachments resulting in injuries to children and adults.

Children have suffered injuries including a concussion, injuries to the head and face requiring stitches, dental injuries, contusions and abrasions.

Adults have sustained injuries including torn labrum, fractured bones and torn ligaments, contusions and abrasions.

The Commission authorized the issuance of the complaint after Britax declined to recall or repair the strollers that pose a substantial risk of injury to children and adults.

The complaint charges that the design of the strollers allows a consumer to use the stroller without the front wheel being properly secured. When the quick release fails to secure the front wheel to the fork, the front wheel can suddenly detach during use.

When the front wheel of the stroller detaches, the front fork can dig into the ground and cause the stroller to stop abruptly and tip over, posing a risk of serious injuries to children in the stroller and adults operating the stroller. Since January 2012, approximately 200 consumers have reported front wheel detachments while using the stroller, resulting in at least 97 injuries to children and adult consumers. At least 50 children and 47 adults have been injured.

The three-wheeled strollers include the following 17 models: 

·      Ironman

·      Ironman Duallie

·      Revolution

·      Revolution CE

·      Revolution Flex

·      Revolution Flex Duallie

·      Revolution Pro

·      Revolution Pro Duallie

·      Revolution SE

·      Revolution SE Demo

·      Revolution SE Duallie

·      Revolution SE Duallie Plus

·      Revolution SE Plus

·      Sport Utility Stroller

·      Stroller Strides

·      Stroller Strides Duallie

·      SUS Duallie

The Commission voted 3-1 to approve the filing of the complaint which seeks, among other things, an order that the firm stop distributing various models of the Strollers identified above, notify the public of the defect and offer consumers a remedy which may include a repair, replacement, or refund as plead in the complaint.

Story source: https://www.cpsc.gov/Newsroom/News-Releases/2018/CPSC-Sues-Britax-Over-Hazardous-Jogging-Strollers

Your Child

FDA Bans Certain Cough Medicines for Kids

2:30

 

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA,) has added strict restrictions to the use of children’s cough medicines that contain opioids, such as codeine or oxycodone.

"After safety labeling changes are made, these products will no longer be indicated for use to treat cough in any pediatric population and will be labeled for use only in adults aged 18 years and older," the FDA said in a news release.

The country is in the middle of an opioid abuse epidemic that is devastating families in just about every state. An updated Boxed Warning label will also warn adult users "about the risks of misuse, abuse, addiction, overdose and death, and slowed or difficult breathing that can result from exposure to codeine or hydrocodone," the agency added.

FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb said the agency is concerned about exposing children to opioids unnecessarily.

“We know that any exposure to opioid drugs can lead to future addiction. It's become clear that the use of prescription, opioid-containing medicines to treat cough and cold in children comes with serious risks that don't justify their use in this vulnerable population,” Gottlieb said in the press release.

The new rules announced Thursday were "based on an extensive review of available data and expert advice," the agency said.

They go much further than the 2017 labeling rules -- restricting use of codeine-containing products to everyone under the age of 18, and including cough-and-cold products that contain a second drug, the opioid oxycodone.

In any case, there's little that can or should be done to ease most children's cough and colds, the FDA said.

"Experts indicated that although some pediatric cough symptoms do require treatment, cough due to a cold or upper respiratory infection typically does not require treatment," the agency said. "Moreover, the risks of using prescription opioid cough products in children of all ages generally outweigh the potential benefits."

The press release also pointed to known side effects of opioid medications, "drowsiness, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, constipation, shortness of breath and headache."

The FDA recommends that parents currently using these medications for their child should speak with their child’s doctor about alternative therapies

It's always important to read medicine labeling, too -- even if it's not obtained by prescription.

"Caregivers should also read labels on non-prescription cough and cold products," the FDA said, because "some products sold over-the-counter in a few states may contain codeine or may not be appropriate for young children."

Story source: EJ Mundell, Health Day Reporter, https://www.webmd.com/drug-medication/news/20180111/fda-bans-opioid-containing-cough-meds-for-kids#1

Daily Dose

CPR

1:00 to read

I was seeing a newborn the other day and the parents had a great idea. Their baby had spit up and they were concerned about how to clear his airway.  When we discussed how to hold the baby to clear the airway they had the great idea of having a CPR “teaching party” for a group of their friends who also had young babies!

 

I do encourage new parents (actually all parents and even grandparents) to take a CPR class. I am fortunate that we have yearly CPR class in our office which keeps us all up to date. 

 

It is fairly easy to find local CPR classes either through the YMCA, the American Heart Association and often through the hospital where you deliver your baby.  But, in these cases you have to take the class on “their schedule”. What a great idea to host a party with your friends and hire a certified CPR instructor to come to you!!

 

You know I do like to “isolate” my newborn patients from crowds (for 6-8 weeks), but it is fun to gather with other parents of newborns to get some social interaction. If everyone brought their baby, and a dish for dinner, it could be a mini dinner party followed by CPR training….ending with wine!

 

So…let’s start planning CPR parties, I may even do one for my friends who are becoming grandparents!

 

 

Daily Dose

Car Seat Safety

1:30 to read

I recently received a text from a patient who asked if she could turn her 17 month old child’s car seat around and have it forward facing in the back seat. She said that her car seat instructions read “may forward face after the child weighs 20 lbs”.

 

Not long after that, another patient came in for her 18 month check up and during the course of the check up I always ask about car seat position.  I remind them that they should continue to have their child in a rear facing car-seat until they 2 years of age.  The child’s mother said that she had turned the car seat around to forward facing because the child “did not like rear facing”.  Interesting discussion with a toddler.

 

So, this just so happens to be Child Passenger Safety Week and National Car Seat Check Saturday as well. What a better time to remind parents that the safest way to restrain your child who is under the age of 2 years (depending on your carseat height and weight restrictions)  is in a rear facing car seat.  

 

In a recently published article in the journal Pediatrics, about 38% of 17-19 months olds were not following AAP recommendations to ride in a rear-facing car seat. The recommendations were changed in 2011 as studies found that young children in a forward-facing car seat were 5 times more likely to be seriously injured than those in a rear-facing seat. 

 

In the study many of the families involved who had their children forward-facing often said that they “thought their child was too tall or too heavy to be rear-facing”. Others commented that “their feet were touching the back seat and they looked uncomfortable”. 

 

Interestingly, your child has been in a rear-facing car seat since birth, so it is strange that they “prefer” to forward face.  Kind of like being in the middle seat of an airplane, if you have never been seated on the aisle you don’t know the difference in seats.

 

If you are concerned about the appropriate car seat for your child or how to install it, this is a good week to have a car seat expert help make sure that your child is riding in the safest car seat possible. If your child is under the age of 2…that also means rear facing!  

 

 

 

 

 

  

Tags: 
Your Baby

How Safe is Your Baby’s Teething Ring?

1:30

Millions of American babies suck on teething rings to ease the discomfort of emerging teeth. Many of those rings contain banned chemicals that can be hazardous to their health, according to new study.

Researchers in the United States, who tested five-dozen baby teething rings, found all of them contained bisphenol-A (BPA) and other endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

Studies in animals have shown that endocrine disruptors interfere with hormones and cause developmental, reproductive and neurological harm, according to the study authors.

Labeling on the teething rings was deceptive, with most of the products characterized as BPA-free or non-toxic. All of them contained BPA, the study found. BPA is banned from children's drinking utensils in the United States and much of Europe.

BPA was not the only banned chemical found; the rings that were tested also contained parabens and the antimicrobial agents triclosan and triclocarban, which are also endocrine disruptors, the researchers said.

"The findings could be used to develop appropriate policies to protect infants from exposure to potentially toxic chemicals found in teethers," said study author Kurunthachalam Kannan and colleagues from the N.Y. State Department of Health's Wadsworth Center.

Because babies suck on teething rings, the presence of potentially harmful chemicals on the surface is concerning, the researchers said. The study authors said this is especially true since they found that BPA and other chemicals leached out of the rings into water.

The 59 teething rings analyzed were purchased online in the United States and tested for 26 potential endocrine-disrupting chemicals, the researchers said.

There are alternatives to teething rings. Frozen mini-bagels, wet washcloths, silicone toys and wooden spoons are just a few examples. Never leave your baby unattended with any of these alternatives. While they are very effective, you should make sure to keep an eye on your little one anytime they have something in their mouth.

The results of the study were published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Story source: Robert Preidt, https://consumer.healthday.com/environmental-health-information-12/chemical-health-news-730/is-that-baby-teether-safe-717512.html

 

 

Daily Dose

Stranger Danger

1.30 to read

We had a question via our iPhone App from an aunt who wanted to talk to her twin 4 year old nephews about “stranger danger”. Unfortunately, this topic has been in the news quite frequently lately with child abduction cases being reported all around the country.

The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children has numerous resources for educating children about safety.  Interestingly, most perpetrators are not actually strangers, but are often someone the parents or another adult knows and may have been around the child on occasion. So, it seems that “stranger danger” may not be the appropriate term to use when teaching our children, especially younger, children about safety. It is important that the conversation about safety begins with children at young ages. It is often easier to use teachable moments to begin the conversation with young children. 

Talk to your child about “safe” strangers, as it is hard for a child to understand why you are talking to grocery store clerks, or people on the playground in the park, and yet they are strangers. It may be best to teach a child to watch out for dangerous behaviors from adults, rather than saying “never talk to strangers”.  Talk about adults who might approach them for directions, or to find a missing pet and role play as to what they should  do. At the same time, teach them that they can turn to “strangers” such a store clerks or mothers with children for help if they are scared.

While talking about this subject use a calm reassuring manner.  You do not want to make your child “too” anxious as most people they will meet are not dangerous, and children do need to interact and trust numerous people around them that they will meet in  different situations.

Another good way to discuss the issue of “stranger danger” is by reading books to young children that deal with the issue. Several good books that I like are:  The Berenstein Bears Learn About Strangers; A Stranger in the Park; I  Can Play it Safe.  There are many other books out there too, so head to your library  or your local bookstore to get some more recommendations. The librarians are often helpful with finding “age appropriate” books.  Lastly, this is not a one time conversation, but should be discussed at different ages and stages of your child’s life.

That's your daily dose.  We'll chat again tomorrow.

Daily Dose

Pool Safety

1:15 to read

As you know, water safety is paramont this time of year so I want to make sure your children are safe this summer.  Drowning is the leading cause of death for children between the ages of 1- 4 and the second leading cause of unintentional death for children under the age of 14.  Over 390 children die each year in their own backyard pools...tragically drowning is typically a SILENT event.

The first thing all pools need is a at least 4 foot tall fence surrounding all 4 sides of the pool. Now is the time to make sure that not only is your pool fenced but that it also is “tuned up” after the winter. That means that the self latching gate is working, that all pool furniture and toys are  moved away from the fence in order that children cannot climb up and over a fence, and you might even add a pool alarm that goes off if anyone enters the pool without supervision. 

If you have a door from the house to the pool there should be an alarm on the door as well as having a fence around the pool…this ensures “layers of protection”..the more layers to keep your child away from an unsupervised pool the better!  Children are clever, fast and tenacious.

Now once you decide to enjoy a day poolside you need to have several things on hand which include a portable phone, a flotation ring or hook, and always an adult within arms reach of a toddler or young child who has not yet learned to swim.  If there are several “non swimmers” in the pool with only 1 adult,  it is best to put all of the children in an approved flotation device as well.  The adult who is supervising the pool should ideally know CPR. I think that all “pool owners” should take CPR.

The person in charge of watching a child or children in the pool need to be identified and vigilant. That means staying off a cell phone or any electronics that might be distracting. It is also not the time for adults to be partying and alcohol is discouraged.  

Most children over the age of 4 years are ready for swimming lessons, but the AAP does recognize that there are some younger children between 1 -4 years who may be ready for swimming lessons, especially those that are frequently around water ( home pool, lake , beach). Each child will develop at differently.  Even a young child who has had swim lessons should not be considered “drown-proof” and never be unsupervised.

Lastly, don’t forget the sunscreen and remember to re-apply frequently to both you and your child!

 

 

 

   

Daily Dose

Baby Bling Can Be Dangerous!

1:15 to read

I recently saw a TV segment on “blinging” your baby and toddler. It seems that the latest craze is decking out not only little girls, but also little boys. Being the mother of three sons I can understand wanting to “dress up” boys as well (little boy clothes can be a bit boring) but a few of the models on TV were wearing necklaces. 

Now, a boy wearing a necklace doesn’t bother me at all, but a baby or toddler with a necklace worries me!  This isn’t about gender, rather about safety.  

A necklace is a real choking and strangling danger for babies and young children. I know that many parents receive necklaces for their babies on the occasion of a baptism and in some cultures an infant is given a necklace made of string or beads to wear soon after birth. 

But, whenever a baby comes into my office with a necklace on I discuss the possibility, even if remote, of the child suffocating if the necklace gets caught or twisted around the child’s neck. There is no reason to even risk it! 

Baby bling is great if you want to put your child in cute shirts, hats, or even trendy jeans. Go for it!  But I would never put a necklace on a child. It is akin to the adage about peanuts...when should a child be allowed to eat peanuts?  When they can spell the word!  

We pediatricians are no longer worried about peanut allergies in the young child, it is the choking hazard that is the real concern. It’s the same for a necklace. Let your child wear it when they can spell the word, or put it on when your 3 year old plays dress up, but take it off once finished. There is no need to ever have a young child sleep in anything like a necklace, or anything that has a cord until they are much older. 

Children ages 4 and under, and especially those under the age of 1 year, are at the greatest risk for airway obstruction and suffocation.  So, put the necklace back in the jewelry box for awhile. You can re-wrap for re-gifting and re-wearing at a later date. Safety before bling! 

Tags: 
Parenting

Family Road Trip!

1:45

With gasoline prices at a reasonable level, many families may choose to skip the hassles of flying and opt for a road trip this summer.

While it may be true, “The best made plans of mice and men often go awry”, it’s still necessary to prepare as best you can for a family road trip; whether it’s to the Grand Canyon, the beach, the grandparents or all of the above.

Before the trip, make sure that the car is in good condition. Have it checked out by a mechanic and any trouble spots fixed. The tires should have plenty of tread and the recommended amount of air for highway travel.

Once you’re ready for the big trip, here are some suggestions to help make it a little less stressful and more fun.

Packing the car:

·      Pack an easily accessible small bag that contains clothes for the next day, an extra change of clothes (for spills), PJs, a toothbrush, and anything else you need for that day and night. It will be much easier to grab than trying to rummage through the big suitcase.

·      Take your toddler or young child’s blanket and pillow. This is extra important if your road trip includes an overnight stay. Kids like their own stuff, particularly at bedtime in a strange place.

·      Babies and toddlers drop, spill, and spit up. Keep a roll of paper towels and a box of wipes in the front seat for easy cleanups. Keep a garbage bag handy too.

The Ride:

Boredom is probably the biggest instigator of trouble for kids packed into a tight space. Prepare to fight boredom with a few tricks of your own.

·      Snacks. Although it only provides a short respite, any quiet time is appreciated. Go light on the sugar – too much can backfire. Choose fresh or dried fruit, whole grain muffins, popcorn, cheese sticks, milk etc. In other words, something healthy and age appropriate.

·      Portable DVD players. These can be a lifesaver. Load up on your children’s favorite movies and don’t forget the headsets if you have different aged kids. Eleven year-olds and three year-olds don’t typically share the same taste in movies and video games. New DVDs they haven’t already seen are a bonus. Let the kids pick out what they want to watch ahead of time. And, make sure you have an extra set of headsets; you know someone is either going to lose a pair or break a pair. That’s a given.

·      If there is more than one adult traveling – one of you can get in the backseat for a while. A little face-to-face contact, some patty-cake, and a few tickling games go a long way toward distracting a cranky baby or a bored toddler.

·      Make sure some favorite toys are within easy reach. You might add a new toy or two your little one hasn’t seen before. Remember etch-a-sketch? Tech savvy youngsters are coming up with some amazing etchings these days!

·      Don’t forget to plan for stops. You'll have to stop for feedings, diaper changes, and stretching breaks. You'll be much less stressed if you accept that it may take twice as long to get there as it did in your pre-kid days and plan accordingly. Pre-teens and teens are going to need to move around too. Besides, sitting for an extended length of time isn’t good for anyone.

Oh, and someone is going to need a potty break soon after the pre-arranged stop has happened. Be patient and pull over, it’s really a lot easier and less taxing than a yelling match about “why didn’t you go when we stopped 30 minutes ago?”

·      If your trip requires an overnight stay somewhere, think about booking a motel that has an indoor pool. It may cost a little more, but it's something to look forward to, and it will help your children sleep better. If they sleep better, you’ll probably sleep better too.

·      Don’t forget about books (or e-books) for the kids that like to read. Coloring books for the younger ones, and brush up on some travel games the whole family can join in on. Here are a few tried and true suggestions. I Spy (I spy with my little eye, something red.) The License Plate Game. Keep a list of all the different state license plates you see. The goal is to list as many states as possible- although Hawaii might be a real challenge anywhere but in Hawaii. The Memory Game. Start a story with one sentence. The next person has to say that sentence then add his or her own sentence to the story. The story can change pretty quickly as everyone tries to remember all the previous sentences and then come up with a new one.

While road trips can be a challenge, they are always an adventure and often become fond memories, as kids grow older.

Have fun this summer and don’t forget to take lots of pictures!

Story source: http://www.parents.com/fun/vacation/ideas/traveling-with-kids-ultimite-guide/

 

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