Twitter Facebook RSS Feed Print
Daily Dose

PU: Body Odor

1.00 to read

I received an email from a mother who asked if her 5 year old son, an avid athlete, could wear deodorant?  It seems that his arm pits “smell like a grown man”.  I have actually been asked this on occasion in my office and I have even noticed body odor (BO) during exams on some 5-8 year olds.   

Most children start to “stink” as they begin to enter puberty, but there are occasional children that for unknown reasons, develop BO without any signs of puberty. If it seems that your child is entering puberty at an early age, you do need to talk to your doctor.  If your child happens to be one of those kids who are just odiferous, there are several things that you can do.

Number one, make sure that your child is bathing/showering everyday, and that they wash their armpits well. Some little boys (and I bet a few girls) just pop in and out of the shower without touching soap on most of their bodies.  (I used to smell my boys hair when they came out of the shower, sometimes still smelled sweaty, no soap!).

If daily bathing does not do the trick, it may be time to use a deodorant, which just masks the smell. This often works for younger kids who are really stinky rather than sweaty.  An anti-perspirant actually stops and dries up perspiration and may not be needed until an older age.

There are numerous deodorant products available, some of which are natural as well. Head to the store and read labels to decide which one you prefer.

Your Teen

Overweight Girls Start Periods At Earlier Age

1.45 to read

Early-onset menstruation is linked to later health problems such as breast cancer, said Sarah Keim, a researcher at The Ohio State University College of Medicine in Columbus, who wasn't involved in the new study. Girls who get their period early in life are also more likely to have sex sooner than their peers, Keim added, which increases the risk of teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases.It's nothing new that girls are getting younger and younger when they have their first period, but experts worry that the current obesity epidemic could be fueling that trend.

Overweight or obese girls get their first period months earlier than their normal-weight peers, according to a Danish study. Early-onset menstruation is linked to later health problems such as breast cancer, said Sarah Keim, a researcher at The Ohio State University College of Medicine in Columbus, who wasn't involved in the new study. Girls who get their period early in life are also more likely to have sex sooner than their peers, Keim added, which increases the risk of teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. About 17 percent of American kids and teens are obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For the study, researchers used information on body mass index (BMI) -- a measure of weight in relation to height -- and age at first period from about 3,200 Danish girls born between 1984 and 1987. The girls started their period just after they had turned 13, on average, which is about half a year later than in the U.S. Keim said part of the reason for this difference may be that African-Americans tend to start their periods before white girls. On average, a girl got her period about 25 days earlier for every point her BMI increased. For a female of about average height and weight, a one-point change in BMI is equivalent to about six pounds. Overweight and obese girls, for example, got their period three to five months before normal-weight girls, said Anshu Shrestha, a graduate student at UCLA School of Public Health, who worked on the study. There has been past research showing a link between BMI and when girls start menstruating. However, since this study was done more recently, it shows that the link is holding up in today's generation, Keim said. The researchers also found that a girl's mother's weight was related to when her daughter started menstruating, but less so than earlier work had hinted. For every point her mother's BMI when pregnant went up, the girl's period came about a week earlier, according to the new study, which was published in the journal Fertility and Sterility. Keim said the Danish findings reinforce the importance of keeping a healthy weight. "It's important for your entire life, starting from very early on," she told Reuters Health. "And it can even affect your children's health." Talking to your daughter about Menstruation. Most girls begin to menstruate when they're about 12, but periods are possible as early as age 8. That's why explaining menstruation early is so important. But menstruation is an awkward subject to talk about, especially with preteen girls, who are often embarrassed by this discussion. So what's the best way to approach this ticklish topic? If your daughter asks questions about menstruation, answer them openly and honestly. Provide as many details as you think she needs at the time. It's OK to let your daughter set the pace, but don't let her avoid the topic entirely. If she's not asking questions as she approaches the preteen years, it's up to you to start talking about menstruation. Don't plan a single tell-all discussion. Instead, talk about the various issues - from basic hygiene to fear of the unknown - in a series of short conversations. Consider it part of a continuing conversation on how the human body works. Remember, your daughter needs good information about the menstrual cycle and all the other changes that puberty brings. If her friends are her only source of information, she may hear some nonsense and take it for fact. To introduce the subject of menstruation, you might ask your daughter what she knows about puberty. Clarify any misinformation and ask what questions she might have. It may be helpful to time your conversations with the health lessons and sex education your daughter is receiving in school, or you could broach the subject before a routine doctor's appointment. You can tell your daughter that the doctor may ask her whether she's gotten her period yet. Then ask if she has any questions or concerns about menstruation. Girls might prefer to learn about menstruation from a female family member, but sometimes that's not possible. If you're a single father and you're not comfortable talking about menstruation, you might delegate these conversations to a female relative or friend. The key is to make sure the information is relayed somehow. The biology of menstruation is important, but most girls are more interested in practical information about periods. Your daughter may want to know when it's going to happen, what it's going to feel like and what she'll need to do when the time comes. - What is menstruation? Menstruation means a girl's body is physically capable of becoming pregnant. Each month, one of the ovaries releases an egg. This is called ovulation. At the same time, hormonal changes prepare the uterus for pregnancy. If ovulation takes place and the egg isn't fertilized, the lining of the uterus sheds through the vagina. This is a period. - Does it hurt? Many girls have cramps, typically in the lower abdomen, when their periods begin. Cramps can be dull and achy or sharp and intense. Exercise, a heating pad or an over-the-counter pain reliever may help ease any discomfort. - When will it happen? No one can tell exactly when a girl will get her first period. Typically, however, girls begin menstruating about two years after their breasts begin to develop. Many girls experience a thin, white vaginal discharge about one year before menstruation begins. - What should I do? Explain how to use sanitary pads or tampons. Many girls are more comfortable starting with pads, but it's OK to use tampons right away. Remind your daughter that it may take some practice to get used to inserting tampons. Stock the bathroom with various types of sanitary products ahead of time. Encourage your daughter to experiment until she finds the product that works best for her. - What if I'm at school? Encourage your daughter to carry a few pads or tampons in her backpack or purse, just in case. Many school bathrooms have coin-operated dispensers for these products. The school nurse also may have supplies. - Will everyone know that I have my period? Assure your daughter that pads and tampons aren't visible through clothing. No one needs to know that she has her period. - What if blood leaks onto my pants? Offer your daughter practical suggestions for covering up stains until she's able to change clothes, such as tying a sweatshirt around her waist. You might also encourage your daughter to wear dark pants or shorts when she has her period, just in case. Your daughter may worry that she's not normal if she starts having periods before, or after, friends her age do, or if her periods aren't like those of her friends. But menstruation varies with the individual. Some girls have periods that last two days, while others have periods that last more than a week. It can even vary this drastically from month to month in the same girl. The amount of blood lost each month can vary, too, usually from 4 to 12 teaspoons (about 20 to 60 milliliters). It's also common for girls to have irregular periods for the first year or two. Some months might even go by without a period. Once your daughter's cycle settles down, teach her how to track her periods on a calendar. Eventually she may be able to predict when her periods will begin. Schedule a medical checkup for your daughter if: - Her periods last more than seven days - She has menstrual cramps that aren't relieved by over-the-counter medications - She's soaking more pads or tampons than usual - She's missing school or other activities because of painful or heavy periods - She goes three months without a period or suspects she may be pregnant - She hasn't started menstruating by age 15 The changes associated with puberty can be a little scary. Reassure your daughter that it's normal to feel apprehensive about menstruating, but it's nothing to be too worried about and you're there to answer any questions she may have.

Parenting

Bedwetting Accidents

1:45

I’ll admit it; I was a bed-wetter on and off until I was about 6 years of age. The biggest hurdle I faced in getting past leaving a little puddle of urine in the bed during the night, was visually realistic dreams. I would actually see myself get out of bed, walk to the bathroom and sit on the toilet. Unfortunately, I was only dreaming and would awaken after feeling a wet spot in the bed. It was quite embarrassing.

An accident in a friend’s bed during a sleepover was the last straw.

It took several pre-bedtime experiments to finally help me make it through the night dry; but eventually I was able to tell reality from dreams.

How common is bedwetting? Nocturnal enuresis (the medical name for bedwetting) is involuntary urination that happens at night during sleep after the age when a child should be able to control his or her bladder.

About 13 percent of 6 year olds wet the bed, while about 5 percent of 10 year olds.

Bedwetting sometimes runs in families – if one or both parents wet the bed when they were children, odds are that their children will too.

Most of the time, bedwetting goes away on its’ own. Until that time, it can test a parent’s patience and cause a child plenty of anxiety.

To help a child cope with this uncomfortable time, reassure your child that bedwetting is a normal part of growing up for many kids, and that it will not last forever. If you have stories of your own experiences, this would be the time to share them with your little one.

My child also wet the bed and one sure way to stop her tears of embarrassment was to tell her one of my own personal experiences.  It didn’t take long to switch from sobbing to laughing over our shared nighttime horror.

Kidhealth.org offers these tips for breaking the bedwetting spell:

- Try to have your child drink more fluids during the daytime hours and less at night (and avoid caffeine-containing drinks). Then remind your child to go to the bathroom one final time before bedtime. Many parents find that using a motivational system, such as stickers for dry nights with a small reward (such as a book) after a certain number of stickers, can work well. Bedwetting alarms also can be helpful.

- When your child wakes with wet sheets, don't yell or punish. Have your child help you change the sheets. Explain that this isn't punishment, but it is part of the process. It may even help your child feel better knowing that he or she helped out. Offer praise when your child has a dry night.

Sometimes, bedwetting can be a signal that there is a medical condition that should be checked out. If it begins suddenly or is accompanied by other symptoms, talk to your pediatrician.

The doctor may check for signs of a urinary tract infection (UTI), constipation, bladder problems, diabetes, or severe stress.

Call the doctor if your child:

•       Suddenly starts wetting the bed after being consistently dry for at least 6 months

•       Begins to wet his or her pants during the day

•       Snores at night

•       Complains of a burning sensation or pain when urinating

•       Has to pee frequently

•       Is drinking or eating much more than usual

•       Has swelling of the feet or ankles

•       Is 7 years of age or older and still wetting the bed

Bedwetting can be a sign that a child is under a lot of stress. Often, when a child loses a family member or pet, is doing poorly in school or is frightened about something, they will suddenly start wetting the bed – even if they’ve never done it before or have mastered the art of getting through the night dry.

Your support and patience can go a long way in helping your child feel better about and overcome the bedwetting.

Remember, the long-term outlook is excellent and in almost all cases, dry days are just ahead.

As for me, I had to find a touchstone to let me know the difference between dreaming and actually getting up to go the bathroom. It was the bathroom light switch. If I actually touched the light switch and turned it on, then counted to five before moving, I was really awake. If the light was already on and I walked to the toilet and sat down- I was dreaming.

Story source: http://kidshealth.org/en/parents/enuresis.html#

 

 

Daily Dose

National Poison Prevention Week

1:30 to read

It is National Poison Prevention Week and it seem appropriate since I just received a call last week from an anxious mother whose toddler had gotten into some medication at their house. The child was fine but I reminded her that more than 2 million people each year, about half under the age of 6, ingest or come into contact with a poisonous substance.  The majority of these incidents occur when parents or babysitters are present but are not paying attention at the time. As I remind parents, it is IMPOSSIBLE to watch your child, even with just one child, all of the time. So…it is necessary to take steps to try to prevent accidental poisonings.

 

The most dangerous potential poisons are medicines, cleaning products, liquid nicotine, pesticides, gasoline and kerosene. I am always surprised to hear that a child will drink gasoline (YUCK right?) but toddlers do crazy things and put EVERYTHING in their mouths.

 

When “child-proofing” the house against so many dangers, try to keep as many poisonous products outs of a child’s reach and view as possible.  Install safety latches on all cabinets that may contain any hazardous products …including laundry products and cleaning products. I would advise against using any detergent “pods” with children under the age of 6 and use powder or liquid instead.  A safer product is worth a little bit of hassle!

 

Make sure that ALL medications, even vitamins are in containers with child safety caps (adults can’t open them but kids seem to?), but you must also keep them out of reach of children and I would recommend a cabinet that you can lock.  There have been several occasions when a parent has left a pill out on a counter for another child to take and then suddenly the toddler has chewed it up…this has been most common with stimulant medications.  Grandparents who are visiting also forget and leave their medications out and kids seem to find these as well.

 

Another common potential poison comes in the form of a button cell battery. These are common in remote controls, key fobs, greeting cards and even musical children’s books and not only pose a choking hazard but may cause tissue damage. If your child ingests a battery it is imperative that you seek immediate treatment at an emergency room.

 

If you are ever in doubt about the potential for poisoning call Poison Help at 1-800-222-1222. They are experts in walking you through potential side effects, treatments and need for an ER visit!  One of my patients just asked me if there is a limit to how many times you can call Poison Control…she seems to be a frequent flyer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Daily Dose

New Sleep Guidelines for Your Baby

1:30 to read

I am sure that many of you heard about the latest recommendations on infant sleep that the American Academy of Pediatrics has released. The latest policy statement from the AAP recommends that all infants sleep in their parents room, but not in the parents bed,  for at least the first 6 months of life and preferably for the first year!!  This is big news and quite a change from the previous sleep recommendations which were published in 2011.

 

All of the latest recommendations regarding sleep are intended to help to reduce the incidence of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome), which is the leading cause of death for children under the age of 1 year. SIDS in one of the greatest fears of all parents. While “the back to sleep” campaign has reduced the incidence of SIDS, there are still over 3,500 babies in the U.S. who die suddenly and unexpectedly every year while sleeping. (this includes some from suffocation and strangulation and not SIDS).

 

In addition, the recommendations re-iterate that the baby should not co-sleep with their parents, but should be in a crib or bassinet with a firm sleep surface, in the parents’ room. These new recommendations, may be driven by the reality that breast feeding mothers are exhausted and often fall asleep while nursing their baby. If the mother is sitting in a chair or on the couch and falls asleep the baby may be at risk of suffocation if they roll into a cushion or fall down between pillows. If the mother is in bed breast feeding and accidentally falls asleep at least the baby is on a firm surface - make sure when you do breast feed your baby in bed to remove all loose blankets and pillows in the area around your baby prior to feeding - just in case.

 

Although it has been a long ago, I always put our infants in their own cribs to sleep -  you might say I was obsessed. One night, shortly after the birth of our 3rd child I found myself on my hands and knees looking under the bed. When my husband was awakened and asked me “what are you doing?” I replied…”looking for the baby!” He then reminded me that I had put the baby in his crib in the nursery right after I had finished breastfeeding him.  I truly had no memory and thought he had fallen under our bed!! This, from someone who had previously stayed up for 36 hours during residency working in the hospital and thought I could handle sleep deprivation- clearly not true!! I just remember the feeling of being frantic! 

 

The AAP continues to recommend that the crib be essentially bare - in other words, no bumpers, no blankets, no stuffed toys, just the fitted crib sheet. The baby should always be placed on their back to sleep…once your baby learns to roll from back to front ( which typically happens after they have learned to roll tummy to back), they may be left to sleep on their tummy. Even with a baby in your room you cannot get up all night to keep trying to keep them from rolling over!  

 

The AAP does recommend using a pacifier for sleep times ( I am a huge pacifier fan as you know). The only problem with a pacifier is convincing The Parents that it is time to “get rid of the paci” once their baby is over a year old….. sometimes hard to sell that concept.

 

Lastly, the APP reiterated that they do not support the use of any of the devices sold to new parents to help “prevent”  SIDS. In other words, all of the technology being marketed including  “anti-SIDS mattresses, home cardiorespiratory monitors, and even fancy video monitors.  While many a well intentioned parent will invest a lot of unnecessary money and time trying to make the baby safe during sleep, the mantra “less is more” is now the best way to ensure safe sleep for your baby. I remind parents that there will be plenty of ways to spend that money  - start the college savings!

 

 

 

 

Daily Dose

Flying With A Baby

1:15 to read

Overheard on the plane this week:  I am in row 15 and there is the cutest most precious 4-5 month old baby girl behind me in row 16.  Key point….she is sleeping as we are making our approach!

 

The mother of the baby is traveling with her mother so there are is a grandmother along to dote on this darling baby. The mother of the baby says to her mother…”we need to wake her up now!!!”  “Mom, please wake her up as we need to feed her NOW!”  At this point the mother takes out a whisk of some sort to put into the breast milk…do you have to mix with a whisk now?

 

So…of course they wake up the baby who starts to cry, but just a bit…and then the grandmother starts to feed the baby the bottle.  The mother is saying, “Mom, just make her eat”.  Now it is really bumpy as we are getting ready to land and I was wishing I had a bottle to calm me too!

 

The baby seems to be quietly eating, but then must have stopped eating as now the mother of the baby takes the baby from the grandmother and starts to try to give her daughter the bottle.  She starts talking to the baby saying, “ please keep eating so your ears will stay clear” followed by “Mommy is going to drink the bottle, so you can see me keeping my ears clear too”.  “If you keep sucking your ears will be pain free”. 

 

Everything seems to be going well…although we still have not landed, when the mother says “I am going to force feed you to keep your ears clear!”  Uh…oh I am thinking, I know where this may be going.  But it seems so far, so good. 

 

Just as we are about to touch down I hear this gurgling noise from behind me and then the mother saying, “Oh dear she is spitting up!!”   Really, are you shocked??

 

But…I must say, the baby was quiet and content…who knows, I would have never awakened that sweet baby girl, but then again, I still believe, “never wake a sleeping baby”, even on an airplane.

 

 

 

Daily Dose

Hot Car Deaths

1:30 to read

Did you know that heat stroke is the second leading cause of non-traffic fatalities among children, with the first being backover deaths.  As the summer temperatures are rising these tragic accidents become all too frequent.  

My home state of Texas leads the country in child vehicular heat stroke deaths, followed by Florida and California.  But children who are trapped in vehicles have died in milder climates as well. The temperatures outside may be as low as 60 degrees, but the inside of a car heats up quickly, with 80% of the increase in temperature happening in the first 10 minutes. The reason for this is due to physics.....the sun’s short-wave radiation is absorbed by dark dashboards and seats...the heated objects including child seats then emit long wave radiation which heats a vehicle’s interior air.  All of this leads to tragedy.

A child’s thermoregulatory system is not the same as an adult’s, and their body temperatures will warm 3 -5 times faster.  When a child’s body temperature rises to about 107 degrees or greater, their internal organs begin to shut down.This scenario can then lead to death. If you see a child who has been left in a hot car call 911...every minute matters.

The greatest percentage of these tragic deaths are totally unintentional.  These parents are not “bad parents” or “child abusers”, they are loving, good parents who simply forgot that their child was in the car. On average there have been around 37 deaths per year due to vehicular heat stroke and in most cases this is not due to reckless behavior but simply to forgetfulness.  Parents and caregivers both admit to “just forgetting” a child was in the car.  It truly can happen to anyone.

So, how can you remember that your precious, quiet, sleeping child is in back seat. Make it a routine to always look in the back seat before you lock and leave the car.  Try putting your purse, briefcase, or cell phone in the back seat as a reminder to look for your child. Lastly, if your child is in childcare, have a plan that the childcare provider will call you if you have not notified them that your child will not be coming to school,  and they don’t show up.

Your Child

Gluten-Free Diet Not Recommended for Healthy Children

2:00

A “gluten-free “ label on a food product is one sure way to increase sales as the popularity of such items continues to rise.

For people with Celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, eating gluten can cause diarrhea, abdominal pain, upset stomach and bloating. However, for healthy adults and particularly children, there are many reasons to avoid going gluten-free according to a commentary recently published in the Journal of Pediatrics, by Norelle Reilly.

Dr. Norelle Reilly is Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Columbia University Medical Center and the director of pediatric celiac disease in the Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University.

In a recent Time Magazine article, Reilly lays out four reasons why healthy children should not be on a gluten-free diet.

1. Gluten is not naturally toxic except for people with celiac disease, however, in almost all children, gluten travels through the intestine without causing disease and will never lead to problems. To date, science has not shown that there is a toxin in gluten that makes it bad for our bodies. A balanced diet containing fresh fruits and vegetables, lean proteins, and a variety of carbohydrate sources is the best way for healthy children to stay healthy, Reilly notes.

2. A gluten-free diet may not provide balanced nutrition for children. Some people assume that gluten-free food and healthy food as the same thing. Not necessarily so, says Reilly.

Many gluten-free substitutes for items such as breads and cookies are actually higher in fat and calories than gluten-containing varieties. Gluten-free items such as some cereals and breads may also not be nutrient fortified to the same degree as those with gluten. Folate and B-vitamins are often added to our usual starch staples, silently protecting people whose diets may not be very balanced from deficiency. Without these quiet sources of nutrition, vitamin deficiencies could develop, she writes.

Gluten-free foods are often fiber deficient, which is important for gastrointestinal health, including maintaining regular bowel movements. Quite commonly, children who initiate a gluten-free diet become constipated. Increased consumption of rice, a common gluten substitute, may also expose children to more arsenic in their diets, as arsenic is frequently present in the earth where rice is grown.

Reilly says that growing bodies and brains require balanced nutrition. For those children who need a gluten-free diet, balance can be implemented safely and healthfully with the guidance of an experienced registered dietitian to help avoid all of these and other nutritional pitfalls.

3. Have your child tested for celiac disease before putting them on a gluten-free diet. You can’t know for sure whether your child is gluten sensitive or has celiac disease until a physician has tested them. Symptoms alone are not enough to determine whether your child has celiac disease. Being on a gluten-free diet before having your child tested can make it more difficult to determine whether he or she actually does or does not have the disease.

Reilly suggests that if you are concerned that your child may have a problem with gluten, speak to your child’s doctor before banning it from your child’s diet. A child with celiac disease needs special monitoring over time and their family members may need to be tested. Even if you plan to give the diet a try regardless of the test result, it is extremely important for your child and family’s health to know why the diet is necessary.

4. A gluten-free diet is hard to maintain and expensive. For children who require this limited diet for long-term health, parents, schools, and the medical teamwork to make the child’s experience in school and at home as easy as possible.

Reilly notes that the children she has treated for celiac disease would trade in their gluten-free diet in an instant if they knew gluten would not make them sick.

In addition she adds, gluten-free foods are incredibly expensive and for many families the diet can be challenging to financially sustain in the long run.

Many adults prefer a gluten-free diet, but Reilly cautions that parents should check with their pediatrician or family doctor before putting their healthy children on the same eating plan.

Story source: Norelle Reilly, http://time.com/4329517/4-reasons-why-your-kids-should-not-be-gluten-free/

Daily Dose

Ear Infections

1:30 to read

Musings from the very busy pre-holiday pediatric office:  with all of the advances in technology over the last 30 years why is it that examining a child’s ears and visualizing their eardrum continues to be challenging?  I started thinking about this while examining a very unhappy, strong and febrile toddler….probably the 20th patient of the day. 

 

During the “sick season” many of the patients who come to my office are young children whose parents are worried that they may have an ear infection.  This concern is one of the most frequent reasons for pediatric office visits. While I realize that many of my colleagues are in the operating room operating on brains or doing open heart surgery (truly saving lives) the one advantage that they have is that their patient is under anesthesia while they are doing complicated procedures. Which only means that they are not trying to wrestle, cajole, or coax a child into letting them look into their ear canal, and then only to find that you can’t see a thing as the canal is full of wax (cerumen).  

 

At times examining ears can be fairly simple and straight forward, but some days it seems that it may be easier to attempt to fly than to look at a 16 month old child’s ears. Today was one of those days. It seemed that every child I saw had a temperature over 102 degrees, and they all had “waxy” ears. While there are several ways to remove wax from the ear canal, none of them is easily done in a toddler, especially when the wax is hard and difficult to remove. Having 3 children myself and one who had recurrent ear infections and tympanostomy tubes, I know what it is like to have to hold your child on the pediatrician’s exam table while they irrigate or “dig” wax out of the ears.  Not fun….!!!  But, at the same time I realize that this is the only means to see if the ear is infected and if there is the need for an antibiotic. 

 

With the advent of the HIB and Pneumococcal vaccines the incidence of ear infections has dropped significantly, as these bacteria were common causes of otitis. But, ear infections are still the #1 reason that a child receives an antibiotic, especially in the first 2 years of life.  Therefore, a good ear exam is one of the most important things your pediatrician does, as I know you don’t want your child to receive an unnecessary antibiotic!

 

Please know that pediatricians do not enjoy making a child uncomfortable, but somehow that ear drum needs to be seen…especially in a sick child.   

 

So…why has some brilliant medical device inventor not found a way to wave a magic wand over a child’s ear to “tell me” if their ear is infected?  To date, I have not seen any “new” ways to accurately examine an ear other than with the otoscope…and a clean ear canal…which means unhappy children (and parents ) while I try to clean their ears.  

 

Remember, don’t use q-tips in your child’s ears and if your pediatrician has to struggle a bit to clean out  your child’s ears, it is only because they are doing a good job!!  I am waiting for the “easy” button….surely it is coming…maybe Santa will bring it!

 

 

   

Pages

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

What can you do if your child stinks?

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.