Twitter Facebook RSS Feed Print
Daily Dose

Have Your Child's Blood Pressure Checked

1:00 to read

When you take your child in to the pediatrician for a check-up do they check their blood pressure? The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that children, beginning at the age of three years, should routinely have their blood pressure checked.  

In certain circumstances a younger child should have their blood pressure checked too. With the growing epidemic in obesity, pediatricians are seeing more children with abnormal blood pressure readings. It is important that the right sized blood pressure cuff is used for measuring a child’s blood pressure. There are standards for blood pressures for different age children. The standards are also based on a child’s height.

When a child’s blood pressure reading is greater than the 90th percentile for their age they are said to have pre-hypertension. The prevalence of childhood hypertension is thought to be between one and four percent and may even be as high as 10 percent in obese children. Obesity plays a role but, related to that is also inactivity among children, diet, and their genetic predisposition for developing high blood pressure. Then it is appropriate for further work up to be done to evaluate the reason for the elevation in blood pressure.

If I find a child with a high blood pressure reading during their physical exam, it is important to re-take their blood pressure in both arms. I also do not depend on automated blood pressure readings, as I find they are often inaccurate and I prefer to use the “old fashioned” cuff and stethoscope to listen for the blood pressure. If the blood pressure reading is abnormal, then I have the child/adolescent have their blood pressure taken over a week or two at different times of the day. They can have the school nurse take it and parents can also buy an inexpensive blood pressure machine to take it at home. I then look at the readings to confirm that they are consistently high. The “white coat” syndrome, when a doctor assumes that the elevated blood pressure is due to anxiety, may not actually be the case, so make sure that repeat blood pressures are taken. If your child does have elevated blood pressure readings it is important that further evaluation is undertaken, either by your pediatrician or by referral to a pediatric cardiologist.

That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow.

Your Baby

Kids of Obese Mothers at Higher Risk for Autism, ADHD

1:45

A new study points out another reason that obesity and pregnancy can be a bad combination not only for the mother but for her future child as well.

Researchers found that six-year-olds whose mothers were severely obese before pregnancy are more likely to have developmental or emotional problems than kids of healthy-weight mothers.

The lead author of the study, Heejoo Jo of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and her team reviewed data on 1,311 mother-child pairs collected between 2005 and 2012, including the mothers’ body mass index (BMI, a height-to-weight ratio) before pregnancy and their reports of the children’s psychosocial difficulties at age six.

The researchers also incorporated the children’s developmental diagnoses and receipt of special needs services.

Kids of moms who were severely obese, with a BMI greater than 35, were twice as likely to have emotional symptoms, problems with peers and total psychosocial difficulties compared to kids of moms who had a healthy BMI, between 18.5 and 25.

Their children were three times as likely to have a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder and more than four time as likely to have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), as reported in the journal Pediatrics.

Previous studies have shown a connection with autism and maternal diabetes and obesity.

Researchers took into account pregnancy weight gain, gestational diabetes, breastfeeding duration, postpartum depression and infant birth weight. None of these explained the apparent association.

“We already do know that obesity is related to health problems during pregnancy and throughout the lifetime,” Jo said. “I think this adds to that by suggesting that not only does severe obesity affect a woman’s health but the health of her future children.”

This study could not analyze the mechanism linking severe obesity and later risk for developmental problems, Jo noted.

“One theory that we could not look at and needs further research was some small studies have linked maternal obesity to increased inflammation, which might affect fetal brain development,” she told Reuters Health by phone.

While it sounds cliché because we’ve heard it so much; obesity in America has reached epidemic status. Almost 30 percent of Americans are obese and the prevalence of maternal obesity has risen rapidly in the last two decades.

In the USA, approximately 64% of women of reproductive age are overweight and 35% obese.

Women’s health specialists recommend that obese women considering pregnancy lose weight before they conceive to help reduce health risks for themselves as well as their child.

The Academy of Pediatrics recommends that all children be screened for developmental delay or disability at nine, 18 and 24 or 30 months of age.

Health experts strongly suggest that women who were obese or severely obese when they became pregnant make sure that their children receive these developmental screenings.

Sources: Kathryn Doyle, http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/04/28/us-obese-pregnancy-adhd-kids-idUSKBN0NJ2FC20150428

James R. O'Reilly, Rebecca M. Reynolds, http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/776504

Your Teen

Good Family Relationships Helps Teens Avoid Obesity

1:30

Two of the most valuable resources a teen can have are a stable family and a good relationship with their parents. Adolescents that have these two important components in their lives are more likely to develop healthy habits that may protect them from obesity, according to new study.

"A high level of family dysfunction may interfere with the development of healthful behaviors due to the families' limited ability to develop routines related to eating, sleep or activity behaviors, which can lead to excess weight gain," said the study's lead author, Jess Haines, of the University of Guelph in Ontario.

For the study, the researchers reviewed information on about 3,700 daughters and 2,600 sons, aged 14 to 24, in the United States.

About 80 percent reported having close and stable families. The findings showed that 60 percent of daughters and 50 percent of sons said they had a good relationship with their parents.

Researchers also found that teens with good family relationships are more likely to be more active and get enough sleep. Two factors, in addition to a healthy diet, that contributes to reasonable weight control.

The daughters in these families ate less fast food, and were less likely to be overweight or obese, the researchers discovered.

They also noted that fathers play an important role in helping their sons develop better choices that allow them to maintain a healthy weight.

"Much of the research examining the influence of parents has typically examined only the mother's influence or has combined information across parents," Haines said in a university news release.

"Our results underscore the importance of examining the influence fathers have on their children, and to develop strategies to help fathers support the development of healthy behaviors among their children," she said.

"It appears the father-son parent relationship has a stronger influence on sons than the mother-daughter relationship has on young women," said Haines.

As kids grow into adolescents, a tug of war between independence and parental control often develops. Research has shown that ongoing positive family relationships offer protective influences for teens against a range of risky behaviors. Sometimes it may feel like as our teens mature, family influence begins to wane - but that’s not the reality. This study points out how important a stable home life and good relationships are in helping teens develop a lifetime of healthy habits.

The study was published recently in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity.

Story source: Mary Elizabeth Dallas, https://consumer.healthday.com/public-health-information-30/family-health-news-749/parents-play-key-role-in-teens-health-712354.html

Daily Dose

Bedtime!

1:30 to read

Bedtime….an important word for parents and for children. A recent study in Pediatrics just reinforces how important bedtimes for children may be.  The research shows that preschool children who had an earlier bedtime were less likely to become obese in their teenage years. 

The study involved nearly 1,000 children who were born in 1991 and whose parents recorded their bedtimes when they were 4.5 years old.  The researchers then looked at the growth data (height/weight) for these children when they were 15 years of age.

Interestingly, the pre-school children who were in bed by 8:00 p.m. had half the risk of becoming obese as a teenager compared to those children who went to bed after 9 pm. Specifically, of the children who went to bed by 8 pm, only 10 percent were obese as teens, while 16 percent of those who went to bed between 8 and 9 pm developed obesity, and 23 percent of those children   who had bedtimes after 9 pm developed teenage obesity. 

While there has been much research surrounding sleep and obesity (as well as behavior), this study provides even more evidence to the possible “protective effect” of early bedtime and bedtime routines for young children.  If getting to bed on time and earlier can in some way help stem the obesity tide, it would seem like an easy recommendation for many parents to follow.  

As a mother I was always a “fan” of schedules and bedtimes…and actually putting your child to bed at night is such a wonderful time of day. The routine of a bath, snuggles, some books ( with wishes for just one more) and more hugs and kisses is such a wonderful memory I have of my own 3 boys. It just seemed that everyone was happier (and I guess healthier) when we had early bedtimes. I remember I had a friend who always had her 3 young children fed, bathed and in bed by 7:00 p.m. every night..and in those pre cell phone days we did not dare call her house after that time!!  

I also think bedtime routines are important for younger children year round. While it is more difficult to have regular bedtimes for older children during the summer months, children under elementary school age (and maybe even older) really do benefit from continuing on the same bedtime schedule during the summer months.  I think if you told your middle school or teenager this “rule” there  might be mutiny….but I know as well as a working parent, it is much easier to have a routine even when the kids are out of school…they would totally disagree!

I am excited about this study and using it as another resource when discussing sleep habits and bedtime routines with my patients.  

Daily Dose

Plate Size & Childhood Obesity

1.15 to read

While I have been trying to change up my eating habits a bit and talking to patients about trying some new foods, I came upon an interesting study in the journal Pediatrics.  

The hypothesis for the study, which was done among school children in Philadelphia, was “can smaller plates promote age-appropriate portion sizes in children?”.

There have been previous studies in the adult literature that have shown that dish ware size influences self-serve portion sizes and caloric intake. Whether the same conclusions with children were true had yet to be examined, but it does make sense that it might.

So, the hypothesis was correct and when children were given larger bowls, plates and cups, they served themselves larger portions and in turn more calories. In the study, 80% of the children served themselves more calories at lunch when using adult-size plates and bowls.

This is really great news, in that by changing the size of the plate we might be able to affect a child’s portion size without them even really being aware!

I remember that our kids all had children’s bowls, plates and cups that they loved to use and eventually they either broke, got lost, or we just decided to have everyone eat off of the same plates. But, maybe it would make more sense to continue to have our children use child sized plates until they reach puberty?  Certainly seems that it wouldn’t hurt and if schools did the same thing we might be able to impact some of the obesity problem by just changing one behavior.  It is definitely worth trying!

Daily Dose

Family Dinners Help Fight Obesity

1.15 to read

Sadly, the problem with obesity in America does not seem to be going away, and is not even improving!! The latest data shows that adult obesity rates have risen in 23 states in 2009 and the trend continued through 2010 and 2011.

Obesity and the problems associated with it, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, joint problems etc. begin in childhood. If we cannot change our children’s eating and exercise habits we have no hope of stemming the tide of ongoing obesity. By 2020 the headlines might read, “Obesity rising in all 50 states” with the majority of the population dealing with this crisis. In that vein we must not only begin modeling better eating habits for our children, but do so by returning to the idea of family meals. Family meals were the “norm” when I was growing up. We were fortunate to have breakfast and dinner at home each day and we were expected to be present for those meals. I know it was hard for my mother to do this as she worked when I was young, and my father travelled a great deal of the time. But parental sacrifice has not changed over time, and we all know that we will often do things “just for the kids”. The good thing about preparing meals these days is that the grocery stores have made it quite easy for even a very busy family to be able to prepare a “home cooked” meal. All of the chains have rotisserie chickens available and also offer prepackaged meats such as meat loaf, pre-made hamburger patties, or fish filets. The salads are also prepackaged and you can even buy fruit already cut up. I am “thrifty” and don’t mind making my own hamburger patties or cutting up fruit, but picking up a chicken on the way home from work is often a quick way to begin a dinner. The chicken can be used in a salad or used as a main course. We parents just have to be a little more inclined to drive through the grocery store rather than the fast food restaurant. I am still convinced that our children will eat what we prepare and gather together for meals if that becomes the norm once again. Our kids are busy too, and they will appreciate knowing that dinner will be there every night, and that it will be healthy. Leading by example is the best way to begin. We can’t afford not to try! That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow. Send your question or comment to Dr. Sue!

Your Baby

Longer Breast-Feeding Time, Less Childhood Obesity

2:00

A new study looks at the duration of breast-feeding and babies who are high risk for obesity, as they get older. Researchers found that the longer mothers breast –fed these higher risk babies, the less likely the babies were to become overweight later.

"Breast-feeding for longer durations appears to have a protective effect against the early signs of overweight and obesity," said lead researcher Stacy Carling, a doctoral candidate in nutrition at Cornell University, in Ithaca, N.Y.

Carling and her colleagues followed 595 children from birth to the age of 2. They tracked the children's weight and length over this time, and compared individual children's growth trajectories to how long the children breast-fed.

Which children are considered at high risk for extra weight gain? Researchers found that babies whose mothers were overweight or obese, mothers with lower education levels and mothers who smoked during pregnancy were more likely to have overweight children. Almost 59 percent of the children at risk for being overweight had mothers with one or more of these characteristics, compared to about 43 percent of the children not at risk for excessive weight gain.

Higher-risk babies who breast-fed for less than two months were more than twice as likely to gain extra weight than those who breast-fed for at least four months.

Although the study didn’t prove that longer breast-feeding actually reduced risk for obesity, it did provide several reasons why the link between the two may exist.

"Breast-feeding an infant may allow proper development of hunger and satiety signals, as well as help prevent some of the behaviors that lead to overweight and obesity," Carling said.

"Breast-feeding, especially on demand, versus on schedule, allows an infant to feed when he or she is hungry, thereby fostering an early development of appetite control," she said. "When a baby breast-feeds, she can control how much milk she gets and how often, naturally responding to internal signals of hunger and satiation."

The study did not include information on whether the babies were exclusively breast-fed or how often they were getting milk at the breast versus from a bottle, but the time required to reduce obesity risk was not long.

"The difference of two months of breast-feeding may be enough to reap some benefit," Carling said.

There are many reasons mothers choose to breast-feed for shorter periods, and some mothers are not able to breast-feed at all. For mothers that choose to breast-feed, Carling believes they need to be supported on many levels.

"Ultimately, increasing breast-feeding rates in the United States means increasing knowledge and support at a variety of levels from institutional to interpersonal," Carling said. "Our study recognizes the benefit of longer duration breast-feeding in a specific population and, hopefully, this and other studies will lead to more customized breast-feeding promotion in those populations at higher risk for overweight and obesity."

The findings were published in the January print issue of Pediatrics, and funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health. The authors reported no conflicts of interest.

Source: Tara Haelle, http://consumer.healthday.com/women-s-health-information-34/breast-feeding-news-82/breast-feeding-for-longer-may-protect-infants-at-risk-for-obesity-694218.html

Daily Dose

Chubby Toddlers & Weight Gain

1.15 to read

So, what goes on behind closed doors? During a child’s check up, I spend time showing parents (as well as older children) their child’s growth curve. This curve looks at a child’s weight and height, and for children 2 and older, their body mass index (BMI). This visual look at how their child is growing is always eagerly anticipated by parents as they can compare their own child to norms by age, otherwise called a cohort. 

I often then use the growth curve as a segue into the discussion about weight trends and a healthy weight for their child. I really like to start this conversation after the 1 year check up when a child has  stopped bottle feeding and now getting regular meals adn enjying table food. 

This discussion becomes especially important during the toddler years as there is growing data that rapid weight gain trends, in even this age group, may be associated with future obesity and morbidity. Discussions about improving eating habits and making dietary and activity recommendations needs to begin sooner rather than later. 

I found an article in this month’s journal of Archives of Pediatrics especially interesting as it relates to this subject.  A study out of the University of Maryland looked at the parental perception of a toddler’s (12-32 months) weight. The authors report that 87% of mothers of overweight toddlers were less likely to be accurate in their weight perceptions that were mothers of healthy weight toddlers. 

They also reported that 82% of the mothers of overweight toddlers were satisfied with their toddler’s body weight. Interestingly this same article pointed out that 4% of mothers of overweight children and 21% of mothers of healthy weight children wished that their children were larger. 

Part of this misconception may be related to the fact that being overweight is becoming normal.  That seems like a sad statement about our society in general. 

Further research has revealed that more than 75% of parents of overweight children report that “they had never heard that their children were overweight” and the rates are even higher for younger children. If this is the case, we as pediatricians need to be doing a better job.  

We need to begin counseling parents (and their children when age appropriate) about diet and activity even for toddlers. By doing this across all cultures we may be able to change perceptions of healthy weight in our youngest children in hopes that the pendulum of increasing obesity in this country may swing the other way. 

That’s your daily dose for today.  We’ll chat again tomorrow.

Daily Dose

Parenting Gone Too Far?

1.15 to read

I recently read an article in The New York Times about another new “parenting” book. I am not sure I understand this latest addition to a group of what I would call “extreme parenting” books. 

Similar to the Tiger Mom, or the American mother who extolled the French “method” for parenting, this new book, to be titled “ The Heavy”, is written by a mother who discusses her daughter’s weight issue and how she “enforced her daughter to diet”. 

Dara Lynn Weiss’s book deal stems from a recent article she has written for Vogue detailing her own parenting methods for dealing with her 7 year old overweight daughter.  In the article, Ms. Weiss discusses placing her daughter on a “strict” diet and punishing her for making poor food choices. 

She has gotten a lot of buzz on TV, radio and online for her methods, which included not only restricting her daughter’s food choices, but humiliating her daughter as well as discussing her own adult issues surrounding body image and weight control. 

I see far too many young children who are overweight and have ongoing issues with food choices. I also spend a great deal of time trying to help educate the parents of these children on how they can help their child become a “healthier eater” without using the word DIET.  

For a child who is 7-8 years old, as is Ms. Weiss’s daughter, the majority of the discussion revolves around the food that is available in the home, how the entire family eats, how much exercise a child gets, and what the child eats for lunch (whether they take their lunch or buy a school lunch). The discussion never includes words like “shame, punishment, or humiliation”, but rather terms like “healthy eating for growing bodies, modeling eating habits, and teaching children about better food choices.”  

While this approach may seem boring it does work.  Parents truly are the “boss” of the majority of their child’s food choices for the first 8-10 years of a child’s life. Why do you have to berate or punish a child in order to promote good nutrition? We are not talking about a teen who is driving through fast food joints, or eating from the 7-11 counter. 

Lately it seems that unless you’re writing “books on parenting that anger parents” or cause a huge backlash on Internet sites, no one wants to read them?  

A good parent does not need to use EXTREMES.  Is there no middle ground any more?  Can we not go back to the days of “everything in moderation”. The pendulum seems to have swung so far that a mother can score a major book deal while berating her young daughter and in my mind setting her daughter up for a serious eating disorder in the future. Yes, I also take care of a fair number of anorexic and bulimic patients (mainly girls) and unfortunately many of them have mothers with body image and eating disorders as well. 

So, while I do agree with Ms. Weiss that overweight and obese children must have parental involvement and  the necessary diligence to change their eating habits, I don’t agree with her methods. I am happy that the issue is being discussed but there has to be a better way.  Another bestseller? I hope not for my patients. 

What do you think? I would love your feedback!

Pages

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

How do you measure your child's medicine?

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.