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Your Teen

“Tide Pod Challenge, “ Another Dangerous Teen Stunt

2:00

Just when you think that maybe teens and young adults have come to their senses about trying crazy stunts, a new viral “challenge” emerges and lets you know how wrong you are.

This one challenges primarily teens and young adults to pop a Tide Pod into their mouths and bite down, and then post videos of whatever happens. Some of these individuals experience foaming at the mouth and severe coughing spells after consuming a pod. It’s no surprise to most of us that this bizarre act can be dangerous but many might not suspect that it can also be potentially deadly.

These pods contain concentrated levels of detergent made to dissolve while washing clothes. Because they are designed to dissolve when wet, the same thing can occur in a person’s mouth - leading to the immediate release and absorption of the contents.

Tide Pods contain dangerous chemicals that, if ingested, can lead to life threatening breathing problems, damage to the esophagus from the corrosive ingredients, burns, blood pressure changes, gastrointestinal problems and neurological symptoms, including loss of consciousness. They can bring on a severe asthma attack in those that have asthma already.

The pods contain numerous chemicals that are potentially harmful if ingested. Chief among these concerns is a chemical known as 1,4 Dioxane.

According to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, exposure to this compound can cause eye and nose irritation, kidney problems and possible long-term lung damage. These effects are unlikely to occur if the product is used appropriately.

Through various social media forums, this stunt continues to grow in popularity. It might be wise to have a talk with your child about the very real dangers of ingesting a toxic product such as a detergent pod. While you might think your child would never do such a thing, many parents have found themselves in an ER with their child who thought it might be a fun thing to try. On their own, most kids wouldn’t even think to try something like this, but once a video challenge goes viral, kids are more likely to see it as funny – not dangerous.

Have that talk.

Story source: Sarang Koushik M.D., http://abcnews.go.com/Health/internet-craze-tide-pod-challenge-dangerous-potentially-deadly/story?id=52379523

Parenting

Alert! Cold Weather and Accidental CO Poisoning

2:30

As you know, extreme cold weather has gripped much of the U.S. this winter. From Texas to Florida, up the east coast and across the heartland, families have been struggling to stay warm. That’s pretty hard to do with temperatures in the minus 20s and wind chills in the minus 30s.

As temperatures drop, the use of gas heating goes up along with the risk for accidental carbon monoxide poisoning or CO.

That's because carbon monoxide exposure is both highly toxic and very hard to detect. The gas is colorless, tasteless and odorless.

As a result, more than 20,000 Americans seek emergency care each year for carbon monoxide poisoning, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More than 400 die.

As recently as last week, a teenager was killed and 41 others were sickened by carbon monoxide in a New Jersey apartment building. Officials say a clay liner in a chimney fell and blocked the carbon monoxide exhaust from escaping. No one in the apartment knew the liner had fallen and the carbon monoxide detector was not working at the time.

If you heat your home with gas, oil or coal, installing a carbon monoxide detector is one of the most important things you can do. Just like fire detectors, you have to make sure that the batteries are charged and replaced at least once a year.

CO can be emitted from gas furnaces, gas powered water heaters, charcoal grills, propane stoves, portable generators and cars left running in an enclosed area such as a garage.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends these guidelines to help prevent accidental CO poisoning:

·      DO have your heating system, water heater and any other gas, oil, or coal burning appliances serviced by a qualified technician every year.

·      DO install a battery-operated CO detector in your home and check or replace the battery when you change the time on your clocks each spring and fall. If the detector sounds leave your home immediately and call 911.

·      DO seek prompt medical attention if you suspect CO poisoning and are feeling dizzy, light-headed, or nauseous.

·      DON’T use a generator, charcoal grill, camp stove, or other gasoline or charcoal-burning device inside your home, basement, or garage or near a window.

·      DON’T run a car or truck inside a garage attached to your house, even if you leave the door open.

·      DON’T burn anything in a stove or fireplace that isn’t vented.

·      DON’T heat your house with a gas oven.

·      DON’T use a generator, pressure washer, or any gasoline-powered engine less than 20 feet from any window, door, or vent.  

Symptoms of CO poisoning may include sleepiness, headache, dizziness, blurred vision, vomiting, shortness of breath and convulsions.

Anyone experiencing such symptoms should be immediately pulled out into the open air. It's important to seek medical help right away: Call 911 or the Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222.

This has been and looks to continue to be, a brutal winter indeed.  Many families rely on gas and fireplaces to stay warm when temperatures plummet, like the ones we’re experiencing now. It’s extremely important to make sure that your home is protected from this silent killer, carbon monoxide.

Story sources: Alan Mozes, https://consumer.healthday.com/public-health-information-30/poisons-health-news-537/beware-carbon-monoxide-dangers-when-cold-weather-strikes-729829.html

https://www.cdc.gov/co/guidelines.htm

Your Child

Can Eating Fish Make Kids Smarter?

2:00

As the New Year approaches and after all the turkey, dressing, mashed potatoes and gravy, cookies and cakes– you might be thinking of starting off 2018 a little healthier!

How about starting a family love affair with fish? Myth has it that fish is actually good food for the brain-- but it just might be more than myth, a new study suggests.

Kids who ate fish at least once a week had intelligence quotients, or IQs, that were nearly 5 points higher than the IQs for kids who ate less fish or none at all, the study found. Fish eaters also slept better. How’s that for encouragement?

The study was small and conducted with Chinese children, but American kids are just as likely to benefit from fish, according to lead researcher Jianghong Liu, an associate professor of nursing at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing in Philadelphia.

"If parents want their children to be healthy and higher-performing, they should put fish on the table once a week," Liu said.

Although the study cannot prove that eating fish accounted for the higher IQs and better sleep, they do seem to be associated, she said.

According to the researchers, the benefit in IQ can be pinned to the better sleep afforded by omega-3 fatty acids found in many types of fish.

To find out if fish was linked to benefits in children's health, Liu and her colleagues studied the eating habits of more than 500 boys and girls in China, 9 to 11 years old. The children completed a questionnaire about how often they'd eaten fish in the past month, with options that ranged from never to at least once a week. 

The kids also took the Chinese version of an IQ test that rates verbal and nonverbal skills, called the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised.

In addition, the children's parents answered questions about their child's sleep quality. The information collected included how long kids slept, how often they woke during the night and whether they were sleepy during the day.

Liu's team also took into account other factors that could influence the findings, such as the parents' education, occupation and marital status and the number of children in the home. 

The team found that children who ate fish at least once a week scored 4.8 points higher on the IQ tests than those who seldom or never ate fish. Kids whose meals sometimes included fish scored slightly more than 3 points higher. 

Moreover, eating more fish was linked with better sleep.

Not everyone is so excited about the study’s results. One U.S. nutritionist says that advice to eat fish should be taken with a grain of salt. 

"It's not that eating fish is unhealthy per se, but there are issues that need to be considered before parents go overboard feeding fish to their kids to make them smarter and sleep better," said Samantha Heller, a senior clinical nutritionist at New York University Medical Center in New York City. She was not involved with the study.

Fish is a good source of lean protein and is high in omega-3 essential fatty acids, she said. These acids are highly concentrated in the brain and play important roles in neurological function. They are essential for brain, eye and neurological development in fetuses. They are also necessary for eye, heart and brain health in adults and may reduce systemic inflammation, Heller said.

One concern many people have is the amount of mercury found in some fish. The advice many nutritionists offer is that families should concentrate on eating fish that are low in mercury such as shrimp, canned light tuna, salmon, pollock and catfish, according to the FDA.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends only one to two 2-ounce servings of low-mercury fish a week for children ages 4 to 7; 3 ounces for children 8 to 10; and 4 ounces for children 11 and older, Heller said.

"A healthy, balanced diet, plenty of exercise and limited computer and screen time can all help kids sleep better and do better in school," Heller noted.

The study was published online Dec. 21,2017, in the journal Scientific Reports.

Story source: Steven Reinberg, https://consumer.healthday.com/kids-health-information-23/adolescents-and-teen-health-news-719/can-eating-fish-make-kids-smarter-729613.html

Daily Dose

Cord Blood Banking

1:30 to read

Expectant parents (including my own children) often ask me about banking their newborns cord blood. They see a lot of information about “cord blood banking” in their obstetricians offices, on the internet and comments on their social media sites.

 

The American Academy of Pediatrics just released updated guidelines on “cord blood banking for potential future transplantations”.  The AAP (as well as most professional societies in both the U.S. and Europe) is in favor of public cord blood banking systems. 

 

There are definitely important differences between public and private cord blood banks. Public cord blood banks are non profit and serve the needs of the general public, while private cord blood banks are for the use of an infant or family member who may have a serious disease.  Public banks do not charge parents a fee for storing cord blood, while private cord blood banks typically charge several thousand dollars for the initial banking followed by annual fees. 

 

Accreditation of cord blood banks is extremely important and public cord blood banks are held to better quality control than private banks. The process of collecting, processing and utilizing cord blood cells for possible transplantation to an infant or child with malignancies, metabolic disorders or immune deficiencies is arduous and should be supervised by regulatory agencies. At this point private cord banks do not all have to follow the same regulations and there is nothing to ensure that all cord blood banks comply. 

 

Many parents are also under the false assumption that their child’s stem cells harvested from the cord blood might be used if their child develops childhood leukemia. In fact, scientists have found that those stem cells already contain pre-malignant leukemic cells and would not prevent a reoccurrence of leukemia. In other words, those stem cells would not be used for transplantation, but rather another donor’s stem cells would be used for your child if they developed leukemia. 

 

Lastly, the chance that an infant’s cord blood stem cells will be utilized for transplantation to help another child is 30 times greater in the public cord blood banking system than from a private cord blood bank.

 

The pediatric hematologists and oncologists (doctors who take care of children with blood diseases and malignancies) I know do not recommend private cord blood banks and have had their own children’s cord blood donated to public cord blood banks. This is also the recommendation I gave to my own children.

 

So if you are having a baby and are getting asked if you want to participate in cord blood banking, I would skip the private companies and donate to the public cord blood bank where your child’s stem cells might help save another child’s life. 

 

Parenting

Recognizing the Signs of Self-Harming

2:30

It’s not a topic that any parent wants to think about - children that purposely hurt themselves. As disturbing as it is to contemplate the possibility that your child may be hurting his or herself intentionally, not paying attention to the signs could have far more distressing consequences.

A recent study from the UK found that the rise in self-harm reports increased nearly 70% among teen girls between 2011 and 2014. It’s not only the United Kingdom that is seeing an increase in teens that self-harm but U.S. researchers have seen the rising rates of self-harming teens, particularly among girls aged 10 to 14 years of age.

Neither of these studies looked at the causes, only the number of reported incidences. These increases do not include non-reported or self-treated self-injury.

Self-harm can take lots of physical forms, including cutting, burning, bruising, scratching, hair pulling, poisoning and overdosing.

When a child self-harms it is not always an attempted suicide or a plea for attention.  Instead, it’s often a way for young people to release overwhelming emotions. It’s a way of coping. So whatever the reason, it should be taken seriously. 

There are many reasons a child may hurt itself but sometimes even the child may not know the underlying reason why they do what they do.

There are links between depression and self-harm.  Quite often a child or young person who is self-harming is being bullied, under too much pressure to do well at school, being emotionally abused, grieving or having relationship problems with family or friends.

The self-harm is often tied to emotions such as:

·      Low self-esteem and low confidence

·      Loneliness

·      Sadness

·      Anger

·      Numbness

·      Lack of control over their lives

Most people want to avoid pain, so the idea of purposely causing emotional or bodily pain is confusing. Often, the physical pain for a child that self-harms is easier to deal with than the emotional pain they are living with. In a way, it gives them control over at least one part of their life.

There are signs that parents can be aware of when a child is physically harming their self. These are commonly found on the head, arms, thighs and chest and may include:

·      Cuts

·      Scratches

·      Bruises

·      Burns

·      Bald patches from pulling out hair

There are also emotional signs of self-harm. These are more difficult to spot and don’t always mean that a young person is self-harming. However, if you notice these signs in your child, they should be taken seriously, particularly if accompanied by the physical signs:

·      Depression, tearfulness, low motivation

·      Withdrawn and isolated, for example, wanting to be alone in their bedroom for long periods of time

·      Low self-esteem and self-blame

·      Unusual eating habits; increased weight loss or gain

·      Drinking or taking drugs

There are things you can do to help your child, but sometimes it is necessary or to reach out for professional help.

Whatever your relationship to a child, discovering they’re self-harming will inevitably have a big emotional effect on you. But however it makes you feel, it's very important that you stay calm and let them know that you're there to help and support them.

You can’t always figure out what is bothering them. It’s important that you know that – you can’t fix everything. Whatever emotional state you are in, never give the impression that their self-harming has created a big problem for you.

It’s also important to remember that the severity of the injuries doesn’t reflect the young person’s suffering. Something has caused them to self-harm – so it’s always helpful to be sensitive. Saying things such as “the injuries aren’t that bad” or “what have you done to yourself?” could make things worse.

Sometimes your child will talk to you about why they are hurting themselves and sometimes they find it embarrassing or too difficult.  You might suggest they write you an email or letter so they can express their ideas more clearly without interruption.

Your instinct might be to constantly keep your eye on your child, and that's understandable. But by giving them their own space you'll help build up their confidence and trust. Try to find a balance between monitoring what they're doing and respecting their privacy.

It is important to make sure that if they’re harming themselves that they are cleaning and caring for any injuries effectively.

Strangely, when a person self-harms, chemicals are released into the brain which can become addictive very quickly. They may find that they want to change the behavior, but can’t. Professional counseling may help them find solutions.

The number of children and teens that self-harm is on the rise. Some experts believe that high social media use, cyber and in-school bullying as well as uncertain economic times may be contributors.

You may think that there is no way your child would self-harm, but don’t take it for granted. Look for the signs and address the issue if you feel there’s a chance. You shouldn’t accuse your child of self-harm, but you can always open a dialogue by asking them if they know anyone that self-harms or what they think about it.

Story source : https://www.nspcc.org.uk/preventing-abuse/keeping-children-safe/self-harm/

Your Baby

Choosing the Safest Fish to Eat During Pregnancy

2:00

As a parent or an expectant mom, you may have travelled down the same path as many others- searching for the healthiest diet for your family or soon-to-be newborn.

Fish is one of the foods that rank high on the healthy food chart. It’s frequently referred to as a “brain food” because of its brain-boosting nutrients, particularly omega-3 fatty acid. Certain fish are an excellent choice while others may contain high levels of mercury; a known toxin than can harm a developing child.

Mercury is a common seafood pollutant. This neurotoxic chemical can harm a baby’s developing brain in utero, even at very low levels of exposure.

Seas are increasingly polluted by toxic chemicals from 2 major sources: small gold mines and coal fired power plants, according to a recent report by Healthy Babies Bright Futures (HBBF.)

Mercury in a mother’s body can be transferred to her fetus during pregnancy, exposing the developing fetus to the potent neurotoxin.

The report states that millions of women of childbearing age who eat mercury -contaminated fish have enough of the toxic chemicals in their bodies to harm a developing child. “55% of the global sample of women measured more than 0.58ppm of mercury, a level associated with the onset of fetal neurological damage.” This is the finding of a new, first of its kind report on mercury levels in women of childbearing age in 25 countries by HBBF partner, IPEN: the International POPs Elimination Network

While these findings may make you wonder if any fish are safe to eat, many health experts recommend that women who are pregnant should not give up eating fish out of fear of mercury toxins, but should focus on eating fish found to be very low in mercury. These include: wild Alaska salmon, sardines from the Pacific, farmed mussels, farmed rainbow trout, and Atlantic mackerel (not trawled).  

High mercury risk fish to avoid include shark, swordfish, orange roughy. bigeye tuna, king mackerel and marlin.

The FDA and the EPA joined forces this year and released new guidelines on fish consumption for pregnant women or those who might become pregnant, breastfeeding mothers and parents of young children. To governmental agencies created a chart to help these consumers more easily understand the types of fish to select. The agencies have an easy-to-use reference chart that sorts 62 types of fish into three categories:

  • “Best choices” (eat two to three servings a week)
  • “Good choices” (eat one serving a week)
  • “Fish to avoid”

Fish in the “best choices” category make up nearly 90 percent of fish eaten in the United States. The chart can be found online at https://www.fda.gov/Food/ResourcesForYou/Consumers/ucm393070.htm

The HBBF report also includes a warning about canned tuna. Limit your intake of canned tuna. While tuna is higher in Omega 3s and nutrients than most fish, the mercury levels can vary in individual tuna. Light canned tuna is recommended over white tuna; however, HBBF notes in their report that scientists found that for both types, the potential harm to a baby’s brain exceeds the fish nutrients’ brain-boosting assets.

One tip to remember is that larger fish tend to absorb more mercury than smaller types of fish. Fish should not be eliminated from any family’s diet; the benefits far outweigh the dangers. However, it’s important to choose fish that are known to be lower in mercury for a healthier outcome.

Story sources:  Charlotte Brody, RN, http://blog.hbbf.org/toxic-mercury-and-your-babys-ability-to-learn/

https://www.fda.gov/Food/ResourcesForYou/Consumers/ucm393070.htm

 

Your Child

Bowlegs and Knock-Knees in Kids

2:00

Parents may be concerned when they notice their toddler seems to be bowlegged or knock-kneed. Typically, there’s nothing to worry about, it’s just part of his or her growth development.

The medical term is genu valgum, but the condition is more commonly called bow-legged or knock-kneed. It usually becomes noticeable when a child is 2 to 3 years old, and it may increase in severity until about age 4. It usually self-corrects by the time a child is about 7 or 8 years old. But if the condition doesn’t appear until a child is 6 or older, it could be a sign that there is an underlying bone disease.

During early childhood, knock-knees actually help a child to maintain balance, particularly when the child begins to walk, or if the foot rolls inward or turns outward. When a child has knock-knees, both knees usually lean inward symmetrically. One knee, however, may "knock" less than the other or may even remain straight.

Sometimes, the condition will persist into the teen years. It’s also more common in girls, although boys can develop it too.

Knock knees are usually part of the normal growth and development of the lower extremities. In some cases, it may be a sign of an underlying bone disease, such as Osteomalacia or rickets.

Obesity can contribute to knock knees—or can cause walking problems that resemble, but aren’t actually, knock-knees. The condition can occasionally result from an injury to the growth area of the shinbone (tibia), which may result in just one knocked knee.

Typically, a child’s legs will straighten naturally by the teen years. Bracing, corrective shoes, and exercise are rarely helpful, and may hinder a child’s physical development and cause unnecessary emotional stress, when the child is very young. Rarely, bowlegs or knock-knees are the result of a disease. Arthritis, injury to the growth plate around the knee, infection, tumor, Blount’s disease (a growth disorder of the shinbone), and rickets all can cause changes in the curvature of the legs. 

There are signs to look for that may indicate that a child’s bowlegs or knock-knees are caused by a more serious medical problem:

·      The curvature is extreme.

·      Only one side is affected.

·      The bowlegs get worse after two years of age.

·      The knock-knees persist after seven years of age.

·      Your child is unusually short for his or her age.

·      There is pain in the knees or in the feet, hips or ankles.

·      Stiff joints.

If your child is experiencing any of these symptoms, your pediatrician should examine him or her.

The good news is that most cases of knock-knees or bowlegs will resolve before a child reaches adolescence. However, if it doesn’t and is left untreated, it can lead to further health problems with joints and muscles, including osteoporosis.

Treatment will depend on the cause and the severity. If there is an underlying disease present, medications and supplements may help resolve the condition. A physical therapist may be able to offer some simple exercises and stretches that help strengthen the muscles and realign the knees. Weight loss is recommended when obesity is a contributing factor. Extra weight puts additional strain on the legs and knees, which can cause knock-knees to worsen. Surgery is the last line of treatment but is typically only recommended in very severe cases.

Children’s health experts suggests that parents not panic if their little one has knock-knees, but that they keep an eye on the condition and see if it goes away as the child gets older. At times, children may not have straight lower legs until they are nine or ten years old.

Story sources: https://www.healthychildren.org/English/health-issues/conditions/orthopedic/Pages/Bowlegs-and-Knock-Knees.aspx

Jenna Fletcher, https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/319894.php

 

 

Your Baby

Preparing for Twins or Triplets

1:45

The number of U.S. parents expecting twins and triplets has reached an all-time high according to the National Center for Health Statistics. Multiple births make up a small portion of births in general, but since 1980, multiples numbers have been on the rise.

The number of twins born in the U.S. has increased the most. Along with twice the cuteness comes twice the workload. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) offers parents of multiples some handy preparation tips:

Keep in mind that "multiples" are often born early and tend to be smaller than the average newborn. The AAP says parents may need to visit with their pediatrician more often than usual and reach out for help with feeding concerns or strategies.

And then there are the diapers- lots and lots of diapers! Go ahead and start purchasing your diapers ahead of time. The more you have stocked away before your little ones are born, the less worries you’ll have about running out when you need them most. Also, you’ll be able to gage about how many you’ll need when you start shopping again.

Having multiples also means fitting more safety seats into the car, more clothing, more food and possibly even a larger home! Check out how well your home is going to work for a larger family and plan accordingly.

One of the most important things for parents to consider is making sure that each child has their own identity. Multiples may share everything, but they are individuals and should be raised as such, the AAP advises. Identical twins, in particular, may seem like a duo, and parents might be tempted to give them the same things and the same amount of attention. But even genetically identical children have different personalities, thoughts and emotions. The AAP urges parents to acknowledge and support their differences to help them become happy and secure individuals.

If you have other children, remember they need special attention too. It’s easy to overlook the older kids when the new kids on the block are demanding so much attention.

As multiples grow, they may form exclusive bonds and may even communicate in a way only they can understand. Sometimes, they become unwilling to seek out other friendships. Giving multiples some time apart can help them develop friendships and ensure that other siblings aren't left out, the academy says.

And efforts to encourage multiples to spend time apart should start early to head off resistance. Most elementary schools place multiples in separate classes, the news release noted. Parents who are concerned about preventing separation anxiety can turn to their pediatrician for advice.

Don’t be afraid to ask for help! Multiples demand a lot of attention. If your budget allows, hire someone to clean the house a few days a week. Grandparents, uncles and aunts, brothers and sisters may be willing to pitch in and give you some much needed down time or date time.  Don’t forget about your friends – while you may think it’s too much of an imposition, they may love being able to spend some quality time with your children – then turn them back over to you!

Take turns getting up at night for feedings and changings. Giving your spouse a few hours of uninterrupted sleep will do wonders for your relationship.

There’s a lot to prepare for when multiples are involved but the rewards are great. It may feel a little overwhelming at first, but eventually you will figure out a routine that works for everyone.

Story source: Mary Elizabeth Dallas, https://consumer.healthday.com/women-s-health-information-34/birth-health-news-61/having-twins-or-triplets-what-you-need-to-know-before-they-arrive-715653.html

http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/12/11/twins-triplets-and-more-more-u-s-births-are-multiples-than-ever-before/

Daily Dose

HPV Vaccine

1:30 to read

I don’t think I have posted the latest good news about vaccines. As you know I am a huge proponent of vaccinating children (and ourselves), and remind patients that there continue to be ongoing studies regarding vaccine safety, as well as efficacy.  The CDC and ACIP recently announced that the HPV vaccine may be protective and effective after just 2 doses of vaccine rather than the previous recommendation of a series of 3 vaccines.  That is good news for teens, especially those that are “needle phobic”!  

 

The ACIP (Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices  recommended  a 2 dose HPV vaccine series for young adolescents, those that begin the vaccine series between 11 and 14 years.  For adolescents who begin the HPV vaccine series at the age 15 or older, the 3 dose series is still recommended.

 

This recommendation was based upon data presented to the ACIP and CDC from clinical trials which showed that two doses of HPV vaccine in younger adolescents (11-14 years old) produced an immune response similar or higher than the response in older adolescents (15 yrs or older). 

 

The HPV vaccine, which prevents many different types of cancer caused by human papilloma virus, has been routinely recommended beginning at age 11 years  approved to use as young as 9 years), but unfortunately only about 42% of girls and 28% of teenage boys has completed the 3 dose series.  

 

By showing that a 2 dose series (when started at younger ages) is effective and protective the hope is that more and more young adolescents will complete the series.  The two doses now must be spaced at least 6 months apart and may even be given at the 11 year and then 12 year check up which would not require as many visit to the pediatrician.

 

According to the CDC more HPV - related cancers have been diagnosed in recent years, and reported more than 31,000 new cases of cancer each year (from 2008 - 2012) were attributable to HPV, and that routine vaccination could potentially prevent about 29,000 cases of those cancers from occurring.  But, in order to see these numbers shrink, more and more adolescents need to be immunized…before they are ever exposed to the virus. Remember, the HPV vaccine is protective against certain strains of HPV, but does not treat HPV disease.

 

So..once again a good example of using science based evidence to provide the best protection against a serious disease…with less shots too!! Win - Win!!

 

 

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DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

What every parent needs to know about teen suicide.

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