Your Toddler

Holiday Safety Tips

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The holidays are a fun time of year for families, it's also an important time of year to be mindful of your child's safety.The holidays are a fun time of year for most families, it's also an important time of year to be mindful of your children's safety.

James Schmidt, an emergency room physician at Children’s Hospital of the King’s Daughter in Virginia, sees plenty of avoidable accidents at this time of year — and all year round. "Each year," he says, "parents are warned of holiday hazards, including toxic mistletoe and dangerous toys. Unfortunately most of the holiday hazard stories miss the larger point regarding children's safety. Most of the household injuries that occur during the holiday are the exact same types of injuries that occur commonly throughout the year -— poisonings, choking, falls and burns." There is however, one common seasonal injury — that's when a child pulls over a Christmas tree. Trees should be securely fastened to the wall and toddlers should not be permitted close enough to a tree to tug on it, cautions Schmidt. Other dangers to watch for include easy access to alcohol at holiday gatherings. "During a large party, guests may leave half-imbibed cups around the house. Small children may wander the house sampling the drinks. Children often show up at ERs showing symptoms of alcohol poisoning," he says. Childproofing for the Holidays Most parents understand the importance of childproofing their homes. Gates on stairs, using smoke and carbon monoxide detectors , and keeping medicines and poisons out of reach are fairly standard in many homes. In addition to the risks of holiday decorations, younger children can get into trouble if they visit a home during the holidays (or anytime of year) that isn't childproofed. It is especially likely that a home isn't childproofed if you are visiting grandma and grandpa and they don't usually have children in the house. In addition to not having safety locks on cabinets, gates on stairs, covers on electrical outlets, etc., they may also have prescription medications that aren't in a child resistant container. Things to be especially watchful for, and which you may want to ask about, include: - Do they have a pool? Does it have a fence with a self-closing, self-latching gate? Can the children get to the area where the pool is located? - Are there guns in the house? Are they stored unloaded in a locked box with the bullets locked separately? - Are there small objects, such as hard candy or nuts in candy dishes, where younger children can get them? - Are there gates on the stairs? - Are medications, poisons, and household cleaners out of reach? - Do they have a pet that may harm the children? If there are going to be a lot of younger children present at a holiday gathering, you might consider volunteering to go over before hand and childproof the house for them. Toy Safety The following tips will help consumers choose appropriate toys: - Select safe toys to suit the age, abilities, skills, and interest level of the intended child. Toys too advanced may pose safety hazards to younger children. - For infants, toddlers, and all children who still mouth objects, avoid toys with small parts that can pose a fatal choking hazard. - Look for sturdy construction, such as tightly secured eyes, noses, and other potential small parts. - For all children under age 8, avoid toys that have sharp edges and points. - Do not purchase electric toys with heating elements for children under age 8. - Be a label reader. Look for labels that give age recommendations and use that information as a guide. - If your child is going to be getting something that he can ride, such as a bicycle, inline skates, scooter, or a skateboard, be sure that he also gets the appropriate protective equipment, including a helmet and pads. - Discourage your small children from playing with BB and pellet guns.

Your Toddler

Falling TV Sets Can Be Deadly for Small Children

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The holidays are filled with joy, family, friends and presents. A popular present many families give themselves is a new TV. The old TV is sometimes regulated to the bedroom or guest room. While many of the newer models are lighter than the older ones, they can still crush a young child. Too often these TVs are not anchored well and sit on an eye-level stand.

A new report issued by The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) notes that 43,000 people have been injured by falling TV sets, with 59% of injuries being children.

CPSC urges parents of young children, to anchor their TV sets properly to help prevent these injuries. "We know that low-cost anchoring devices are effective in preventing tip-over incidents. I urge parents to anchor their TVs, furniture and appliances and protect their children. It takes just a few minutes to do and it can save lives," said CPSC Chairman Inez Tenenbaum.

Between 2000 and 2011, 349 people were killed due to TVs or furniture falling on them. Sadly 84 % of those deaths were children younger than 9 years old. Many of the injuries were caused when the television set fell directly on the child’s head.

Public education had helped lower these statistics over the years, but the numbers in 2011 showed a sharp increase. In 2009 there were 27 deaths reported, in 2010 the number was slighter higher at 31 deaths and in 2011 the numbers jumped to 41. The size of televisions are also increasing, it’s not uncommon for sets to be 60 to 80 inches wide.

Reports show that many television related fatalities occur in bedrooms rather than living rooms. Many of the older and heavier sets are put in the bedroom and not secured.

A related study published in 2002 had found that the majority of television-tipping related accidents occur when toddlers are left unsupervised around the television sets.

New furniture and televisions are exciting and we can get in a hurry setting them up – be sure to secure anything that can be pulled over onto someone. These kinds of injuries and fatalities are definitely preventable.

Source: http://www.medicaldaily.com/articles/13515/20121214/tipping-television-kills-children-cpsc-report.htm#vpeoGJy55VW3PhEl.99

Your Toddler

Thumb Sucking

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I admit it – I was a thumb sucker for way too long. My thumb and mouth didn’t part company until I was in first grade. The fear of getting caught during a sleepover at a friend’s house was enough for me to finally call it quits.

It’s normal for babies and toddlers to suck their thumbs. Babies are born with the urge to suck as part of their survival. They also use it as a way to soothe themselves when they feel hungry, afraid, restless, sleepy or bored. Toddlers carry on that natural instinct as they find their way in the world.

By the time children are around four-years-old they’ve typically stopped sucking their thumb and found replacements for self-soothing. Occasionally, children (like myself) will continue to suck their thumb out of habit.

Some experts say that if a child is still sucking their thumb by the age of six, they may be doing so because of emotional distress such as anxiety.

Thumb sucking isn’t a problem under the age of four, but if a child continues- with great intensity- after five or six years old, they could be setting themselves up for dental or speech problems.

Prolonged thumb sucking may cause their teeth to become improperly aligned (malocclusion) or push their teeth outward. If the thumb sucking stops, the teeth most likely will align correctly, but the longer the sucking continues the more likely orthodontic treatment will be needed.

Extended thumb sucking may also cause speech issues such as lisping, inability to say Ts and Ds, and pushing the tongue out when talking. A speech therapist may be needed to help correct these problems.

How do you help your child stop sucking their thumb? It takes a lot of patience.

One place to begin is to pay attention to what triggers the thumb sucking. Does your little one start when they are bored, sleepy, or unsure about something? Redirecting can help. Busy hands help keep thumbs from going into the mouth. Give your child a large stuffed animal to wrap their arms around or have them help hold the book when you are reading to them. Offer a squeezable rubber ball or finger puppets to grasp when they are watching TV.  The key is to offer an alternative at the times you notice they are the most likely to want to suck their thumb.

Ask your child to not suck their thumb in public and gently remind them when you see them doing it. Let them suck their thumb at home, but start the process of being self-aware in public. Kids often unconsciously slip their thumb into their mouth. A reminder helps them notice what they are doing.

You can also start talking to your child about why it’s time to give some thought to stopping. In age-appropriate language explain how thumb sucking is okay for younger children, but as children get older they learn how to stop. Ask them questions like “Do you see (insert name of an older child or adult here) sucking his or her thumb?” They’ll think about it more and start to decide whether they want to continue. It’s a process that takes time.

Punishing or shaming your child is absolutely the wrong method to address thumb sucking. This approach not only doesn’t work, but also lowers a child self-value and can create an even stronger desire to thumb suck. It’s like quitting anything you’re doing that may not be good for you in the long run- the worse someone tries to make you feel about it- the more you want to do it (think overeating, smoking, drinking.)

You can also talk to your pediatrician or family doctor for his or her suggestions on how to help your child. For older children, behavioral therapy may be beneficial.

There are products that are nasty tasting that can be swabbed on your child’s thumb, but some experts think that approach is cruel and more like a punishment than a humane way to help a child outgrow a natural inclination.

Most kids will simply quit sucking their thumb when they are good and ready. Helping your child reach that point may require patience and creativity, but in time his or her thumb will cease to be a constant comfort companion.

Sources: http://children.webmd.com/tc/thumb-sucking-topic-overview

Your Toddler

Tips For Raising A Toddler

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Need help with your toddler? Here’s an easy guide with nine tips containing common mistakes and helpful remedies.

1. Be Consistent. Toddlers do best when they know what to expect, whether it's what time they bathe or go to bed or what consequences they'll face for misbehaving. The more consistent and predictable things are, the more resilient and agreeable a toddler is likely to be. Fix it: As much as you can, keep regular routines for your child. Consistency can be a challenge when parents (or other caregivers) don't see eye to eye. Not sure how best to react if your child dumps food on the floor or ignores bedtime? Sit down with your partner ahead of time to decide on an appropriate response -- and stick with it. "You don't want to send mixed messages," says Tanya Remer Altmann, MD, the author of Mommy Calls: Dr. Tanya Answers Parents' Top 101 Questions about Babies and Toddlers and a pediatrician in private practice in Los Angeles. "You really want to be consistent." 2. Focus on Family Time It's delightful to spend time with the whole family. But some parents go overboard on family time. "Kids cherish time alone time with one parent," says Thomas Phelan, PhD, a clinical psychologist in suburban Chicago and the author of several parenting books, including 1-2-3 Magic. "One-on-one time is fun for parents too, because there's no sibling rivalry to contend with." Fix it: What's a good way to spend one-on-one time with a toddler? Phelan recommends simply getting down on the floor together and playing. 3. Offering Too Much Help Some parents jump in to help a toddler who is having trouble doing something. Before you do, consider the possibility that by helping your child complete a puzzle or put on a shirt, you may be sending the message that he/she can't do it alone -- in other words, that the child is incompetent. "Parents who offer too much help may be sabotaging their young children's ability to become self-reliant," says Betsy Brown Braun, the Los-Angeles-based author of You're Not the Boss of Me. Fix it: "We need to teach children to tolerate struggle," Braun says. Of course, there's nothing wrong with offering praise and encouragement. "Be a cheerleader," Brown says. "Say, 'You can do this!'" 4. Talking Too Much Talking with toddlers is usually a terrific idea. But not when it's time to rein in errant behavior. Imagine a mom has just said "no" to her 2-year-old's request for a cookie. The child fusses. Mom explains that it's suppertime. The child grabs a cookie anyway. Mom takes it away, and tries again to explain herself to her now tearful child. Back and forth it goes, with mounting frustration on both sides. "Talking can lead to what I call the talk-persuade-argue-yell-hit pattern," Phelan says. "Toddlers are not adults in a little body. They're not logical, and they just can't assimilate what you are saying to them." Fix it: What's the smart way to lay down the law? Once you tell your toddler to do something, Phelan says, don't talk about it or make eye contact. If the child disobeys, give a brief verbal warning or count to three. If the child refuses to toe the line, give a time-out or another immediate consequence. No explaining! 5. Avoid Only Kiddie Food Does your toddler seem to eat nothing but chicken fingers and fries? Are goldfish crackers the only fish he or she eats? As some parents realize too late, toddlers fed a steady diet of nutritionally iffy kid's foods may resist eating anything else. Fix it: Encourage your child to try "grown-up" fare. "A good percentage of kids are willing to try a new food if they see mommy and daddy enjoying it," Altmann says. "If they push back, keep putting it on their plate. Some kids need to try things a dozen or more times before they take to it." Her advice:  As long as there's something your child can eat on the plate, don't worry. Do not allow yourself to become your child's short-order cook. 6. Getting Rid of the Crib Cribs do more than keep little ones safe. They promote good sleep habits. A toddler moved too soon into a "real" bed may have trouble staying in bed or falling asleep, and so may end up climbing into bed with mommy and daddy. "Some moms wear themselves out because they have to lie down with their child every night," Altmann says. "They don't realize they're the ones who set the pattern." Fix it: When is it time to get rid of the crib? When your child asks for a bed or starts climbing out of the crib. For most kids, that comes between the ages of 2 and 3. 7. Potty Training Some parents cajole their children into using the toilet when they think it's time -- and issue harsh reprimands when things go awry. That can lead to a power struggle. Fix it: "Children learn to use the toilet when they're ready," Altmann says. "The process shouldn't be rushed." But you can set the stage. Show your toddler the toilet. Explain its use. If you feel comfortable doing so, let your child watch you use the toilet -- and offer praise if he or she gives it a whirl. 8. Too Much TV Time Toddlers who watch lots of TV often have more trouble learning later on. And studies suggest that kids under the age of 2 can't really take in what's being displayed on TV and computer screens. Fix it: Keep your toddler busy with reading and other, more creative pursuits. Have conversations-and encourage talking as well as listening. "The longer you can hold off exposing your child to TV, the better," Altmann says. 9. Trying to Stop a Tantrum Some parents worry that an out-of-control child makes them seem like ineffectual parents. But all toddlers have tantrums. When they do, it's pointless to try to talk them out of it -- even if the drama is unfolding in front of company or in a public place. "When we are in public and dealing with a child, we feel judged," Braun says. "We feel like there is a neon sign over our heads saying we are incompetent parents." Fix it: Braun says parents must remember that the child matters more than the opinions of other people -- especially strangers.

Your Toddler

Magnetic Toy’s Warning Labels Not Enough

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Current warnings labels on magnetic toys don’t seem to be effective in keeping powerful magnets out of the mouths of small children according to a survey by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN.)

The NASPGHAN represents 1700 pediatric gastroenterologists in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico.

The doctors would like to see the magnets banned.  

“Many of our member physicians have had the unfortunate experience of removing these high-powered neodymium magnets from the gastrointestinal tract of innocent infants and children to reduce the risk of abdominal surgery,” said Athos Bousvaros, M.D., President elect of NASPGHAN. “It is simply unreasonable to suggest that product warnings are sufficient to prevent their accessibility to children and adolescents. The only solid way to prevent ingestion of these magnets is to ban them.”

Young children may think that the magnets are candy and older children and even teens use the magnets to mimic tongue piercings.

How dangerous are magnets if ingested?  If two or or more of these small magnets are swallowed they may attract two loops of bowel together and although the intestinal tract is pretty tough, it is no match for high powered magnets. The pinching together of the intestinal walls can cause bowel ulceration, perforations in the intestine and severe injury requiring surgery.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) filed a lawsuit against Maxfield & Oberton, the manufacturer of Buckyballs and Buckycubes, after the company refused to cease distribution of the high-powered, rare earth magnet products that have caused serious injury to children as a result of ingestion.

The company announced on Monday that that they have discontinued the controversial desk toy. The company claims the products were manufactured for and marketed to adults. The products will continue to be sold online until the current supply sells out.

Symptoms of magnet ingestion are abdominal pain, vomiting and fever. These are very common symptoms and may indicate a variety of illnesses. Initial evaluation can miss that magnets are the cause of the problem.  Unfortunately, delay in treatment may lead to an increased severity of consequences. If your child presents with these symptoms, and you know that there have been small magnets in the house, be sure to take your child to the doctor or the emergency room and tell the examining physician.

Sources: http://thechart.blogs.cnn.com/2012/10/23/doctors-warning-labels-on-magnetic-toys-arent-enough

http://www.naspghan.org/user-assets/Documents/pdf/Advocacy/July%202012/N...

Your Toddler

Pain Patch, Serious Threat to Young Children

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For people who suffer with severe chronic pain, a slow released Fentanyl skin patch offers a respite from agony. However, the powerful pain reliever can be deadly for young children who accidently get a hold of a discarded or unopened patch.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a Drug Safety Communication to warn parents, caregivers and health care workers about the dangers of accidental exposure to and improper storage and disposal of fentanyl patches.

In 2012, a toddler in Deerfield, Massachusetts accidently ingested a fentanyl patch after visiting a family member in a nursing home. The child’s great-grandmother was on fentanyl patches for pain. The boy’s parents believe the patch was improperly discarded and either stuck to a Halloween candy bucket or his toy truck while he was playing on the floor. The child ingested the patch 2 or 3 days after the visit and died from an overdose. An autopsy found the patch in the boy’s throat.

The FDA is aware of 32 cases of children who were accidentally exposed to fentanyl since 1997, most of them involving children younger than age 2. There have been 12 deaths and 12 cases requiring hospitalization.

"These types of events are tragic; you never want this to happen. We are looking for ways that we can help prevent this from happening in the future," Dr. Douglas Throckmorton, deputy director of FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in an agency news release. "This reinforces the need to talk to patients and their families to make sure that these patches are stored, used and disposed of carefully."

The fentanyl patches contain a powerful opioid narcotic and are sometimes given to patients who are suffering from cancer and for other debilitating pain causing conditions that have not responded to non-fentanyl pain relievers. The brand name is Duragesic.

A fentanyl overdose -- caused when a child either puts a patch in his or her mouth or applies it to the skin -- can cause death by slowing breathing and increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the blood, the FDA said.

Other overdose symptoms for fentanyl may include:

-       Extreme weakness or dizziness

-       Pinpoint pupils

-       Cold and clammy skin

-       Weak pulse

-       Fainting

The FDA said Monday that it approved changes to the Duragesic patch so the name of the drug and its strength will be printed on the patch in long-lasting ink in a clearly visible color. The agency added that it has asked manufacturers of the generic versions to make the same changes. The previous ink color varied by strength and was not always easy to see.

If you have Duragesic patches in your home make sure that they are properly discarded and that young children are not able to reach them. Older children, such as adolescents should not have access to them as well. A combination of alcohol and fentanyl can quickly become deadly.

Fentanyl is the strongest legal narcotic available. The U.S. government classifies it as a Schedule II Controlled Substance and highly addictive.

Source: http://children.webmd.com/news/20130923/pain-patches-children?printing=true

Your Toddler

Allergy Drops & Sprays Poisonous If Swallowed

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Spring and fall are both beautiful seasons, but for some people they are the time when allergies flare up and cause a lot of misery. This is also when you start seeing a lot of prescription and over the counter nose sprays and eye-drops around the house.

These products work great when used as directed, but the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) warns that they are poisonous if swallowed.  It only takes less than a fifth of a teaspoon to seriously harm a child.

Parents and caregivers often leave these products out where curious toddlers can find them. Since they do not come in child-resistant packaging – little ones can easily open them.

Eye drops injured more than 4500 children under the age of 5 from 1997 to 2009. Nasal sprays injured more than 1,100 children in the same age group during those years according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC.)

The eye drops in question work by causing blood vessels in the eye to constrict. The nose sprays work in a similar fashion by constricting vessels in the nose. Visine is one of the most popular eye drop brands purchased and Afrin, Dristan and Mucinex nose sprays are often used for nasal allergies.

All these products contain a class of drugs called imidazolines. The active ingredients are  tetrahydrozoline, naphazoline, or oxymetazonline. When applied as directed, the drugs only affect the area where they are used - such as the eyes or nose. If any of these chemicals are swallowed, then they quickly affect other areas of the body.

"Generally, symptoms can occur in as little as one hour, peaking at eight hours, and resolving after 12-36 hours," a CPSC briefing paper notes. "Even though the symptoms resolve in a relatively short amount of time, ingestion of imidazolines can result in severe life-threatening consequences, such as decreased breathing, decreased heart rate, and loss of consciousness that require hospitalization to ensure recovery."

The CPSC has asked for a new rule that requires child-resistant packaging for eye drops and nose sprays but that hasn’t happened yet. If the rule should be finalized, manufacturers will still have at least a year to comply. 

Right now, there are lots of these products in use and in homes where small children live. The FDA has a list of suggestions to help avoid accidental poisoning.

  • Store medicines in a safe location that is too high for young children to reach or see.
  • Never leave medicines or vitamins out on a kitchen counter or a child's bedside.
  • If a medicine bottle has a safety cap, relock it each time you use it.
  • Remind babysitters, houseguests, and visitors to keep purses, bags, or coats that have medicines in them away and out of sight when they are in your home.
  • Avoid taking medicines in front of young children because they like to mimic adults.

Many parents or caregivers probably aren’t aware of how dangerous these products can be if swallowed. It’s a good idea to take a walk around the house and make sure that there aren’t any sitting on the counters or in a drawer where little hands can reach.

A list of products containing the drugs mentioned above can be viewed by clicking on the link below.

Source: http://www.webmd.com/parenting/news/20121025/child-poisonings-eye-drops-nose-sprays

Your Toddler

Shopping Cart Injuries: 66 Children Hurt Every Day

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A new study reveals that shopping carts and children can be a dangerous combination. I’m not surprised at the amount of injuries researchers from the Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio found. The study notes that, in the United States alone, 66 children a day are hurt because of falls and spills from being in a shopping cart. That’s one child injured badly enough every 22 minutes to go to the emergency room, or more than 24, 000 children a year. According to a new analysis of data from 1990 to 2011 by Dr. Gary Smith, director of Nationwide’s Center for Injury Research and Policy, the annual number of concussions, linked to shopping carts in children less than 15 years old, has risen nearly 90 percent since voluntary shopping cart safety standards took effect in 2004 “This is a setup for a major injury,” Smith said. “The major group we are concerned about are children under 5.” His study is published in the January issue of the journal Clinical Pediatrics. Newborns and children under 4 years old account for nearly 85 percent of the injuries. More than 70 percent of the harm was caused by falls out of shopping carts, followed by running into a cart or carts tipping over. It only takes a moment for a parent to look away for a shopping cart accident to happen, Smith said. A wiggly baby in an infant seat or a toddler reaching for a bright box of cereal can easily cause a fall that results in serious injury. Children’s center of gravity is high, their heads are heavy and they don’t have enough arm strength to break a fall, Smith explained. In many other countries, shopping cart stability standards help prevent accidents, but the U.S. lacks those standards, Smith says. The reason a high a number of falls and spills doesn’t surprise me is because I see how easily it can happen every time I shop for groceries. For example: During a recent trip for groceries I saw a baby in a carrier that was placed (but not buckled) in the upper seating area of a shopping cart. A rambunctious child of around 5 years old was pushing the cart into a display loaded with cold and cough syrup medicines. In a pleasant but firm voice, I told him to stop. The mother was at the other end of the aisle looking at products. Most of the potential disasters I see involve a toddler that is not securely buckled and is trying to either stand up in or get out of the cart. Parents are either distracted or have left the child “just for a second” to unload their cart or grab another item. If your store provides carts that are low to the ground, like the toy cars, those are a safer option when taking your child with you shopping. If your store doesn’t, ask the manager to start providing those types of carts. If you must use a standard shopping cart, make sure that your child is secured and that you never leave his or her side. It only takes a second for a child to lose their balance or a baby carrier to fall to the ground. It's a long fall and a very unforgiving surface they'll land on. Source: JoNel Aleccia, http://www.nbcnews.com/health/shopping-cart-danger-66-kids-hurt-day-stud...

Your Toddler

Keep Kids Safe from Accidental Poisoning

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Findings by SafeKids Worldwide reveal that each day there are about 165 U.S. children treated in an emergency room after getting into household medications. That’s an astounding statistic because all of these visits were preventable.

Safe Kids Worldwide is a global network of organizations with a mission of preventing unintentional childhood injury, a leading cause of death and disability for children ages 14 and under.

SafeKids Worldwide released the report and unveiled a new initiative called “Safe Storage, Safe Dosing, Safe Kids." The campaign calls on caregivers, medical personnel, pharmacists, drug makers and government groups to work to reduce accidental poisonings of children from medications.

“This is a brand new initiative for Safe Kids, in conjunction with the 50th anniversary of poison control centers and National Poisoning Prevention week,” says Safe Kids Worldwide president/CEO Kate Carr.

The report contains data from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC). While the numbers of childhood poisoning deaths have decreased by half from 1979 to 2006, the percentage of those deaths from prescription and over-the-counter medicines has nearly doubled, jumping from 36% to 64%.

What’s causing this increase? There are several factors including more available and improperly stored medications in homes. Also, the report points to rising numbers of households with multiple generations - which increases child access to medications. Other reasons cited by the report include improperly coordinated medication dosing because of multiple caregivers, and unsupervised young children who love to put things in their mouths.

“Kids in homes are curious, “ explains Carr, “and kids are always going to be curious, so if you have medication, make sure it’s stored up and away.”

Pills may also look like candy to very young children. The data revealed that 95% of the children taken to emergency rooms for accidental poisoning had been left unsupervised. 5 % were because a caregiver gave an incorrect dose of medicine.

Safe Kids' new initiative to fight medication-related poisonings and deaths calls for changes among caregivers, the pharmaceutical industry, the health care community, and both federal and state governments.

Some safety tips offered by SafeKids Worldwide are:

- Always store medicines and vitamins in a locked location, out of the reach and sight of children

.- Always put medicines and vitamins away after every use.  Never leave them on the counter between doses. Don’t be tempted to “keep them handy” in a purse, backpack, or briefcase, or in an unlocked cabinet or a drawer within a child’s reach.  

- Buy child-resistant packages when available and securely close them every time.

 - Remind babysitters, houseguests, and visitors to keep purses and bags that contain medicine up and away when they visit your home.

- Never leave any medicines out or on a counter.

- Program the poison control center number ‒ 1-800-222-1222 ‒ into your home and cell phones so you have it when you need it. 

The report stresses that federal and local governments have “a critical role to play in medication safety,” including effective regulation of the pharmaceutical industry, supporting funding for poison control centers, providing leadership in public health education programs, and providing medication disposal program.

Carr explains that “while accidents do happen, many of them are preventable, and it’s important to identify risks and teach parents and caregivers what they can do to prevent an unnecessary accident.”

It only takes a few precious moments for a child to put something in his or her mouth that could have deadly consequences. The plan urges parents, grandparents, childcare providers and other caregivers to become familiar with safe storage practices, and Safe Kids cites the CDC’s new “Up and Away and Out of Sight” educational program which reminds caregivers to store medications out of sight and out of reach of children.

Sources:

http://thechart.blogs.cnn.com/2012/03/20/skyrocketing-child-deaths-by-meds-poisoning

http://www.upandaway.org/

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