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Your Teen

Are Energy Drinks Rotting Your Teen’s Teeth?

2:00 to read

A lot of parents know that too many high sugar sodas are not only hazardous to their child’s waistline and health, but they can also cause cavities. But what about the energy drinks teens are gulping down? A new study suggests those drinks could be stripping the enamel right off their teeth.   

In a study published in the May/June issue of General Dentistry, researchers have looked for the first time at the effects of energy drinks on teeth. It turns out there's often a lot of citric acid in the drinks.

To give drinks a long shelf life and to enhance flavors, preservatives are added. It’s the preservatives that are very good at stripping the enamel off of teeth.

Dentists are especially worried about teens. 30 to 50 percent are now drinking energy and sports drinks and losing enamel. Once it's gone, teeth are more prone to cavities and more likely to decay.

"We are well aware of the damage that sugar does in the mouth and in the whole body — the role it can play in obesity, diabetes, etc," says Poonam Jain, an associate professor in the School of Dental Medicine at Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville, and the lead author of the study. "But the average consumer is not very well aware that acid does all kinds of damage, too."

To measure just how energy and sports drinks affect teeth, the researchers looked at the fluoride levels, pH, and something called "titratable acidity" of 13 sports drinks and nine energy drinks, including Gatorade and Red Bull.

The researchers then measured how much enamel the drinks took off teeth, dousing sliced-up molars in a petri dish with the beverages for 15 minutes, followed by artificial saliva for two hours. This was repeated four times a day for five days.

The researchers found that teeth lost enamel with exposure to both kinds of drinks, but energy drinks took off a lot more enamel than sports drinks.

Drink labels list citric acid in the ingredients, but they don’t have to show the precise amount.

The American Beverage Association (ABA) was quick to respond to the study.  

"It is irresponsible to blame foods, beverages or any other single factor for enamel loss and tooth decay (dental caries or cavities)," the ABA said in a statement responding to Jain's paper. "Science tells us that individual susceptibility to both dental cavities and tooth erosion varies depending on a person's dental hygiene behavior, lifestyle, total diet and genetic make-up."

"This study was not conducted on humans and in no way mirrors reality," the ABA noted in its statement. "People do not keep any kind of liquid in their mouths for 15 minute intervals over five day periods. Thus, the findings of this paper simply cannot be applied to real life situations."

Jain is concerned about health effects beyond cavities. She says consuming a lot of citric acid can lead to loss of bone mass and kidney stones. "This has become a big concern because people are drinking more of these drinks and less milk," she says.

Dentist Dr. Jennifer Bone, spokesperson for Academy of General Dentistry, the organization that publishes the journal, said in the statement that teens and adults should curb their intake of these types of drinks. If they're going to drink one anyway, she recommends they chew sugar-free gum or rinse their mouth with water after drinking the beverage.

"Both tactics increase saliva flow, which naturally helps to return the acidity levels in the mouth to normal," Bone said.

Sources: http://www.cbsnews.com/sections/health/main204.shtml?tag=hdr;cnav

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health

Your Teen

Teens and Contact Lenses

2:00

As kids with vision problems grow older, many choose to switch from wearing eyeglasses to contact lenses. Teenagers often prefer the no-glasses look and the convenience of not having to keep track of their glasses throughout the day. Contacts are a great alternative to glasses, but they do require attentive hygiene care and should be removed when swimming and sleeping or napping to help prevent eye infections.

A recent report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows more than 85 percent of adolescent contact lens wearers report habits that increase eye infection risk.

The CDC report is the first to analyze wear and care habits of the roughly 3 million U.S. adolescents age 12 to 17 who wear contact lenses, the agency said.

"Contact lenses are a safe and effective way to correct your vision when they are worn and cared for as recommended," Dr. Jennifer Cope, medical epidemiologist in CDC's Waterborne Disease Prevention Branch, said in a press release. "However, adolescents and adults can improve the way they take care of their contact lenses to reduce their risk of serious eye infections."

Researchers noted that the habits that put teens at highest risk for eye infections are sleeping with their contacts in, not being examined by an eye doctor once a year and swimming without removing their lenses first.

In addition, 52 percent of the teens didn’t replace their lenses as often as prescribed.

The most common eye infection from wearing contacts is keratitis, a contamination of the cornea - the clear outer covering of your eye. Sometimes they are called corneal ulcers. Viruses, bacteria, fungi, and a rare but serious eye parasite can cause keratitis.

The signs of an eye infection can include:

·      Redness

·      Swelling

·      Extra tears or sticky gooey drainage from your eye

·      Blurry vision

·      Light sensitivity

·      Itching, burning or feeling like there is something in your eye.

·      Eye pain

If your teen complains of any of these symptoms or you notice that your teenager seems to be having eye problems, get him or her to an eye doctor as soon as possible and make sure they don’t wear their contacts until they are examined.

Eye infections from poor contact lens hygiene habits can lead to serious problems, including blindness, the CDC warns.

Teens are often in a hurry and have a lot on their plates these days. It’s easy to get a little lax about going through the steps to make sure that their contacts are cleaned properly and when you’re really tired, you can simply forget to remove them before bed. You may have to occasionally remind your teen to do these things.

Of course, teens aren’t the only young age group that wears contacts. Kids as young as 10-12 years old can wear them, but experts recommended waiting until a child is 13-14 years old.

I can tell you from experience- once you’ve had an eye infection from not handling your contacts properly, you’ll remember the next time you wear them to make sure they are clean and to take them out when you go to sleep or swim. It’s an ugly and painful experience!

Story sources: Amy Wallace, https://www.upi.com/Health_News/2017/08/17/CDC-Adolescent-contact-lens-wearers-employ-bad-hygiene-habits/3651502994271/?utm_source=sec&utm_campaign=sl&utm_medium=5

http://www.webmd.com/eye-health/contact-lenses-eye-infections#1

Your Teen

Overweight Girls Start Periods At Earlier Age

1.45 to read

Early-onset menstruation is linked to later health problems such as breast cancer, said Sarah Keim, a researcher at The Ohio State University College of Medicine in Columbus, who wasn't involved in the new study. Girls who get their period early in life are also more likely to have sex sooner than their peers, Keim added, which increases the risk of teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases.It's nothing new that girls are getting younger and younger when they have their first period, but experts worry that the current obesity epidemic could be fueling that trend.

Overweight or obese girls get their first period months earlier than their normal-weight peers, according to a Danish study. Early-onset menstruation is linked to later health problems such as breast cancer, said Sarah Keim, a researcher at The Ohio State University College of Medicine in Columbus, who wasn't involved in the new study. Girls who get their period early in life are also more likely to have sex sooner than their peers, Keim added, which increases the risk of teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. About 17 percent of American kids and teens are obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For the study, researchers used information on body mass index (BMI) -- a measure of weight in relation to height -- and age at first period from about 3,200 Danish girls born between 1984 and 1987. The girls started their period just after they had turned 13, on average, which is about half a year later than in the U.S. Keim said part of the reason for this difference may be that African-Americans tend to start their periods before white girls. On average, a girl got her period about 25 days earlier for every point her BMI increased. For a female of about average height and weight, a one-point change in BMI is equivalent to about six pounds. Overweight and obese girls, for example, got their period three to five months before normal-weight girls, said Anshu Shrestha, a graduate student at UCLA School of Public Health, who worked on the study. There has been past research showing a link between BMI and when girls start menstruating. However, since this study was done more recently, it shows that the link is holding up in today's generation, Keim said. The researchers also found that a girl's mother's weight was related to when her daughter started menstruating, but less so than earlier work had hinted. For every point her mother's BMI when pregnant went up, the girl's period came about a week earlier, according to the new study, which was published in the journal Fertility and Sterility. Keim said the Danish findings reinforce the importance of keeping a healthy weight. "It's important for your entire life, starting from very early on," she told Reuters Health. "And it can even affect your children's health." Talking to your daughter about Menstruation. Most girls begin to menstruate when they're about 12, but periods are possible as early as age 8. That's why explaining menstruation early is so important. But menstruation is an awkward subject to talk about, especially with preteen girls, who are often embarrassed by this discussion. So what's the best way to approach this ticklish topic? If your daughter asks questions about menstruation, answer them openly and honestly. Provide as many details as you think she needs at the time. It's OK to let your daughter set the pace, but don't let her avoid the topic entirely. If she's not asking questions as she approaches the preteen years, it's up to you to start talking about menstruation. Don't plan a single tell-all discussion. Instead, talk about the various issues - from basic hygiene to fear of the unknown - in a series of short conversations. Consider it part of a continuing conversation on how the human body works. Remember, your daughter needs good information about the menstrual cycle and all the other changes that puberty brings. If her friends are her only source of information, she may hear some nonsense and take it for fact. To introduce the subject of menstruation, you might ask your daughter what she knows about puberty. Clarify any misinformation and ask what questions she might have. It may be helpful to time your conversations with the health lessons and sex education your daughter is receiving in school, or you could broach the subject before a routine doctor's appointment. You can tell your daughter that the doctor may ask her whether she's gotten her period yet. Then ask if she has any questions or concerns about menstruation. Girls might prefer to learn about menstruation from a female family member, but sometimes that's not possible. If you're a single father and you're not comfortable talking about menstruation, you might delegate these conversations to a female relative or friend. The key is to make sure the information is relayed somehow. The biology of menstruation is important, but most girls are more interested in practical information about periods. Your daughter may want to know when it's going to happen, what it's going to feel like and what she'll need to do when the time comes. - What is menstruation? Menstruation means a girl's body is physically capable of becoming pregnant. Each month, one of the ovaries releases an egg. This is called ovulation. At the same time, hormonal changes prepare the uterus for pregnancy. If ovulation takes place and the egg isn't fertilized, the lining of the uterus sheds through the vagina. This is a period. - Does it hurt? Many girls have cramps, typically in the lower abdomen, when their periods begin. Cramps can be dull and achy or sharp and intense. Exercise, a heating pad or an over-the-counter pain reliever may help ease any discomfort. - When will it happen? No one can tell exactly when a girl will get her first period. Typically, however, girls begin menstruating about two years after their breasts begin to develop. Many girls experience a thin, white vaginal discharge about one year before menstruation begins. - What should I do? Explain how to use sanitary pads or tampons. Many girls are more comfortable starting with pads, but it's OK to use tampons right away. Remind your daughter that it may take some practice to get used to inserting tampons. Stock the bathroom with various types of sanitary products ahead of time. Encourage your daughter to experiment until she finds the product that works best for her. - What if I'm at school? Encourage your daughter to carry a few pads or tampons in her backpack or purse, just in case. Many school bathrooms have coin-operated dispensers for these products. The school nurse also may have supplies. - Will everyone know that I have my period? Assure your daughter that pads and tampons aren't visible through clothing. No one needs to know that she has her period. - What if blood leaks onto my pants? Offer your daughter practical suggestions for covering up stains until she's able to change clothes, such as tying a sweatshirt around her waist. You might also encourage your daughter to wear dark pants or shorts when she has her period, just in case. Your daughter may worry that she's not normal if she starts having periods before, or after, friends her age do, or if her periods aren't like those of her friends. But menstruation varies with the individual. Some girls have periods that last two days, while others have periods that last more than a week. It can even vary this drastically from month to month in the same girl. The amount of blood lost each month can vary, too, usually from 4 to 12 teaspoons (about 20 to 60 milliliters). It's also common for girls to have irregular periods for the first year or two. Some months might even go by without a period. Once your daughter's cycle settles down, teach her how to track her periods on a calendar. Eventually she may be able to predict when her periods will begin. Schedule a medical checkup for your daughter if: - Her periods last more than seven days - She has menstrual cramps that aren't relieved by over-the-counter medications - She's soaking more pads or tampons than usual - She's missing school or other activities because of painful or heavy periods - She goes three months without a period or suspects she may be pregnant - She hasn't started menstruating by age 15 The changes associated with puberty can be a little scary. Reassure your daughter that it's normal to feel apprehensive about menstruating, but it's nothing to be too worried about and you're there to answer any questions she may have.

Your Teen

Stop Yelling at Your Teenager!

2.30 to read

I’m going to go out on a limb and say that anyone who has a child has yelled at him or her at one time or another. As parents, we’ve all lost our patience when we believe our child is misbehaving. If ever there is a time when parents and kids are standing at the crossroad of “Listen to me” and “I don’t need to”, it’s during the teenage years.

Tempers often ignite with harsh words being said.  

While you may be trying to make an important point, aggressive yelling and screaming only pushes your child away and may be doing much more harm than good according to a new study.

An analysis involving nearly 1,000 two-parent families and their adolescent children suggests that such harsh verbal lashings not only don't cut back on misbehavior, they actually promote it.

The end result: an uptick in the kind of adolescent rage, stubbornness and irritation that escalates rather than stops or prevents disobedience and conflict.

"Most parents who yell at their adolescent children wouldn't dream of physically punishing their teens," noted study author Ming-Te Wang, an assistant professor with the department of psychology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Education. "Yet, their use of harsh verbal discipline -- defined as shouting, cursing or using insults -- is just as detrimental to the long-term well-being of adolescents," he said.

"Our findings offer insight into why some parents feel that no matter how loud they shout, their teenagers do not listen," Wang added. "Indeed, not only does harsh verbal discipline appear to be ineffective at addressing behavior problems in youth, it actually appears to increase such behaviors."

Wang and his co-author, Sarah Kenny of the University of Michigan, report their findings in the current issue of the journal Child Development.

The researchers were particularly interested in kids between 13 and 14 years old so they focused on 976 primarily middle-class families in Pennsylvania with young adolescent offspring, all of whom were already participating in a long-term study exploring family interaction and adolescent development. A little more than half the families were white, while 40 percent were black.

The teen participants were asked to disclose recent behavioral issues such as in-school disturbances, stealing, fighting, damaging property or lying to their parents.

Their parents were asked how often they used harsh verbal discipline such as yelling, screaming, swearing or cursing at their child. Most importantly, if they called their child names like “dumb” or “lazy.”

The teens were also asked to what degree they felt “warmth” in their relationship with their parents. Researchers inquired about the amount of parental love, emotional support, affection and care the kids felt like they received from their parents. Both teens and parental depression were tracked.

The study points out that the children who were on the receiving end of the harsh verbal attacks experienced an increase in anger and a drop in inhibitions. Those two reactions prompted an intensification of the very things that parents were hoping to stop – such as lying, cheating, stealing or fighting.

"Parents who wish to modify their teenage children's behavior would do better by communicating with them on an equal level," Wang said, "and explaining their rationale and worries to them. Parenting programs are in a good position to offer parents insight into how behaviors they may feel the need to resort to, such as shouting or yelling, are ineffective and or harmful, and to offer alternatives to such behaviors."

Parents get frustrated with their children and vice versa. None of us behave perfectly all the time. Raising your voice because you are frustrated is one thing, name calling and screaming is quite another.

Imagine if you were at work and your boss screamed at you, called you names and cursed at you because he or she didn’t like how you did something. That may have actually happened to you – remember how you felt, or think about how you would feel. Humiliated, angry and sad are the most common reactions people have.  

Children are trying to find their way in life; parents are their guides. The next time you feel you’re on the verge of screaming or saying hurtful things to your child - walk away. Give yourself time to cool down and find a better way to communicate.

People say kids are resilient and get over things quickly. Many are able to bounce back when bad things happen, but that saying is too often used to excuse bad behavior on a parent’s part. If you’ve crossed the line with your child, say you’re sorry and come up with better ways to handle your frustration and anger.

Words and tone matter and the best teaching method is by example. You can help your child learn what love, patience, tolerance, compassion and respect are by being an example of those very qualities.

Source: Alan Moses, http://consumer.healthday.com/kids-health-information-23/misc-kid-s-health-news-435/yelling-at-insulting-teens-can-backfire-on-parents-study-679863.html

Your Teen

Most Parents Don’t Know Their Teen’s Vaccination Status

1:45

Most parents believe that they are on top of their kids’ immunizations, but that may not be true, especially where their teen is concerned.

Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that adolescents are not getting all their recommended vaccinations, however, more than 90% of parents believe that their teenager had received all vaccinations necessary for their age, according to a C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll.

“In the United States, vaccines have long been recommended for babies and at kindergarten entry; more recently, several vaccines have been recommended for the adolescent age group,” Sarah J. Clark, MPHa research scientist from the Institute for Healthcare Policy & Innovation at the University of Michigan, and colleagues wrote. “However, data from the CDC indicate that national vaccination rates are well below public health targets, particularly those that require more than one dose, such as meningitis, human papillomavirus and annual influenza shots.”

The poll focused on vaccination for teenagers between 13 and 17 and included a national sample of parents.

Most parents had reported that their adolescent child had definitely (79%) or probably (14%) had all vaccinations recommended for their age, despite 36% of parents not knowing when their child is due for their next vaccine. The rest believed their child was due for their next vaccine within the next year (19%) or in more than a year (26%). One in five parents believed their teenager needed no more vaccines (19%).

The majority of parents polled relied on information about their child’s upcoming immunizations from their doctor’s office either through an office visit, scheduled appointment or a reminder that was sent. Rarely, would a notice be sent from the school, health plan or the public health department. A large number were not aware of how to be notified about upcoming vaccinations. 

"Parents rely on child health providers to guide them on vaccines in childhood and during the teen years,” Clark said in a press release. “Given the general lack of awareness about adolescent vaccines shown in this poll, there is a clear need for providers to be more proactive for their teen patients.”

Parents can be more proactive in finding out about their teens and younger children’s immunization requirements by checking their child’s school website or calling the school. The CDC also has a website with vaccination recommendations for children of all ages, including college students at https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/index.html

The 2017-2018 school year will be here before you know it. Many schools will start up again in mid to late August. Do yourself and your child a huge favor by getting their immunizations up-to-date before the last minute rush!

Story source: https://www.healio.com/pediatrics/vaccine-preventable-diseases/news/online/%7Be6c9d80d-86d4-48a7-9090-b1e489e6db56%7D/majority-of-parents-unaware-of-teens-incomplete-vaccination-status

Your Teen

Fewer Teens Having Sex, More Using Contraception

2:00

With the abundance of sexualized media directed at teens today, you might get the impression that they are constantly on the prowl to “hook up.” That’s not the case according to a new government study.

"The myth is that every kid in high school is having sex, and it's not true," noted Dr. Cora Breuner, a professor of pediatrics at Seattle Children's Hospital, who reviewed the findings. "It's less than half, and it's been less than half for more than 10 years," she said.

Sexual intercourse among teens has declined again after rates stabilized between 2002-2010, according to the National Center for Health Statistics report on teen sexual activity and contraceptive use released recently by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

While the numbers aren’t exactly low enough to ease many parents’ minds, they are better than in previous years.

The study found that 42 percent of girls and 44 percent of boys - aged 15 to 19 - reported having sex at least once. That’s a huge decline from the peak of 1988 when 57 percent of teens between the ages of 15 and 19 reported having had sex.

And Breuner said that finding is nothing new. Going back to 2002, fewer than half of older teens told researchers that they are sexually active, federal data show.

Researchers also found that a higher percentage of teens having sex are involved in a relationship that is ongoing.

Three out of four girls participating in the study, said they were "going steady" with their first sexual partner, and a little more than half of the boys said the same. By comparison, only 2 percent of girls and 7 percent of boys said they lost their virginity to someone they just met.

"There's this myth that kids hook up quite a bit and have sex with someone they literally just met," Breuner said. "This dispels that myth, that our teenagers are having sex with people they don't know."

The statistics come from in-person interviews conducted with more than 4,000 teenagers across the United States between 2011 and 2015. Participation was voluntary and required parental permission, but responses were anonymous.

Today’s teens are more aware of and better educated about the dangers of sexually transmitted diseases such HIV and AIDS. Back in 1988, 51 percent of girls and 60 percent of boys between 15 and 19 said they were sexually active, but those numbers dropped to today's levels after word spread of a sexually transmitted disease that could kill, Breuner said.

Teens are also more concerned about the long-term consequences of pregnancy. Nine out of ten participants in the study said they use some form of birth control. Contraception is widely available now; particularly condoms and teens have better access to all forms of birth control than in decades before.  

At the same time, parents have become more at ease with talking about sex and making sure their teens engage in smart sex, Breuner added.

"Parents honestly to their credit were much more willing to talk about this with their teenagers and were more proactive in making sure they had access to contraceptives," she said.

The study was published in the June edition of the CDC’s National Health Statistics Report.

Story sources: Dennis Thompson, http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2017/06/22/Study-Most-US-teenagers-arent-having-sex/4041498137424/

Shamard Charles, M.D., http://www.nbcnews.com/health/kids-health/waiting-right-one-teens-having-sex-later-cdc-finds-n775236

 

 

Your Teen

Good Family Relationships Helps Teens Avoid Obesity

1:30

Two of the most valuable resources a teen can have are a stable family and a good relationship with their parents. Adolescents that have these two important components in their lives are more likely to develop healthy habits that may protect them from obesity, according to new study.

"A high level of family dysfunction may interfere with the development of healthful behaviors due to the families' limited ability to develop routines related to eating, sleep or activity behaviors, which can lead to excess weight gain," said the study's lead author, Jess Haines, of the University of Guelph in Ontario.

For the study, the researchers reviewed information on about 3,700 daughters and 2,600 sons, aged 14 to 24, in the United States.

About 80 percent reported having close and stable families. The findings showed that 60 percent of daughters and 50 percent of sons said they had a good relationship with their parents.

Researchers also found that teens with good family relationships are more likely to be more active and get enough sleep. Two factors, in addition to a healthy diet, that contributes to reasonable weight control.

The daughters in these families ate less fast food, and were less likely to be overweight or obese, the researchers discovered.

They also noted that fathers play an important role in helping their sons develop better choices that allow them to maintain a healthy weight.

"Much of the research examining the influence of parents has typically examined only the mother's influence or has combined information across parents," Haines said in a university news release.

"Our results underscore the importance of examining the influence fathers have on their children, and to develop strategies to help fathers support the development of healthy behaviors among their children," she said.

"It appears the father-son parent relationship has a stronger influence on sons than the mother-daughter relationship has on young women," said Haines.

As kids grow into adolescents, a tug of war between independence and parental control often develops. Research has shown that ongoing positive family relationships offer protective influences for teens against a range of risky behaviors. Sometimes it may feel like as our teens mature, family influence begins to wane - but that’s not the reality. This study points out how important a stable home life and good relationships are in helping teens develop a lifetime of healthy habits.

The study was published recently in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity.

Story source: Mary Elizabeth Dallas, https://consumer.healthday.com/public-health-information-30/family-health-news-749/parents-play-key-role-in-teens-health-712354.html

Your Teen

Excessive Sweating in Teens

2:00

Sweating is a natural function of the body. It helps cools you down when you overheat and expels toxins to prevent toxic overload. But Hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating,) is not only embarrassing; it may also indicate an underlying health problem.

Underarm problems tend to start in late adolescence, while palm and sole sweating often begins earlier, around age 13 (on the average). Untreated, these problems may continue throughout life.

Excessive sweating can stain clothes, impact relationships and complicate social interactions. A recent study noted that 70 percent of teens reporting excess sweating said it interfered with their daily living activities.

Adelaide A. Hebert, MD, chief of pediatric dermatology at the University of Texas, Houston, said during a presentation to the American Academy of Dermatology’s annual meeting, that it is time medical schools pay more attention to it.

“These kids have often seen a number of physicians who really haven’t taken this clinical condition to heart,” Hebert said.

“They don’t know what to do, so they tell the kids not to worry. The kids just don’t get the answers that will be beneficial to them, so educating physicians is key.” Hebert said that global medical education devotes virtually no time to the study of hyperhidrosis in adolescents.

Children, especially teens, normally sweat when:

  • It is hot
  • Eating spicy foods
  • Exercising
  • They are angry, anxious, or nervous
  • They have a fever

However, there are a number of medical conditions that can cause excessive sweating, including:

  • Hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid gland)
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Infections
  • Heart failure
  • Medication side effects
  • Drug withdrawal

How do you know if your teen has a problem with excessive sweating? If your teens’ sweating interferes with his or her daily activities, has become barely tolerable, or seems much heavier than his or her friends doing the same activities, you should talk with your pediatrician or family doctor.

For example, your teen will likely be sweating while playing volleyball, but it shouldn't be so severe that sweaty palms interfere with his or her holding the ball.

Treatments that may help control excessive sweating include over-the-counter antiperspirants as well as prescription antiperspirants, such as:

  • A regular over-the-counter antiperspirant -- use it both in the morning and the evening for best results
  • A newer over-the-counter antiperspirant, such as Secret Clinical Strength (Aluminum Zirconium Trichlorohydrex) or Hydrosal Professional (Aluminum Chloride Hexahydrate 15%)
  • An over-the-counter antiperspirant, such as Certain Dri, with Aluminum Chloride 12%
  • A prescription strength antiperspirant, such as DrySol, with Aluminum Chloride 20%, or Xerac AC, with Aluminum Chloride 6.25%
  • Anticholinergic medications -- although because of their side effects, such as dry mouth, constipation, and drowsiness, they are more helpful for generalized hyperhidrosis, and not teens who just have sweaty palms or excessive armpit sweating

Although the effect is only temporarily, Botox works to block a neurotransmitter that stimulates sweat glands, leading to a decrease in sweat production for 6 to 7 months.

Excessive sweating can cause teens a lot of emotional distress that continues into adulthood. Starting early with a diagnosis and treatment may prove valuable throughout his or her lifetime.

Story sources: Vincent Iannelli MD, https://www.verywell.com/excessive-sweating-and-control-for-teens-2634358

http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/hyperhidrosis2#1

Whitney McKnight, http://www.mdedge.com/pediatricnews/article/132710/pediatrics/physicians-need-take-hyperhidrosis-teens-seriously

 

Your Teen

Teens Support Age 21 to Buy Tobacco Products

2:00

You might be surprised to learn that a majority of teens and pre-teens support raising the minimum age someone can buy tobacco products to 21 years old, according to new research.

The study was conducted to learn more about youth opinions (ages 11 to 18) on laws that would limit the sale of tobacco to individuals age 21 years or older, specifically, the Tobacco 21 initiative.

Tobacco 21 is a program started by the Preventing Tobacco Addiction Foundation that promotes increasing the minimum age for tobacco purchases.

The new study included more than 17,000 teens and preteens from 185 U.S. schools. Researchers found that younger adolescents were more likely to support the initiative and girls were more likely to support raising the minimum age than boys.

"Current studies have focused on the attitudes of adults, and little is known about how youth nationwide perceive the Tobacco 21 initiative as well as the correlations between these attitudes and smoking behaviors," said study author Hongying Dai. She's an associate professor in the Health Services and Outcomes Research Department at Children's Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Mo.

The reasons for increasing the age to 21 are largely scientific. Kids are at the greatest risk of becoming smokers, and smokers almost always begin experimenting with cigarettes and other tobacco products before age 18, the researchers said.

"The adolescent brain is still developing, and using tobacco at that age can actually change and alter brain development," explained Bill Blatt. He's the national director of tobacco programs for the American Lung Association.

"You end up with more brain receptors that are looking for nicotine, and the brain structure changes. That's why you become addicted for a lifetime," Blatt said.

Researchers found that about 71 percent of teens that didn't smoke cigarettes or e-cigarettes supported raising the purchase age. But not surprisingly, teens currently using tobacco products or e-cigarettes were not as keen on raising the age limit. Only 17 percent of teens that smoked cigarettes supported Tobacco 21 initiatives. For current e-cigarette users, the number was 31 percent.

In recent years, there has been a continued decline in teen smoking, but for a while alternative tobacco products such as e-cigarette gained in popularity. That trend seems to be lessening as well.

"A lot of people perceive e-cigarettes as being less harmful than regular cigarettes, and some people think they aren't harmful at all," said Blatt. "But we don't have the evidence to support that."

Tobacco 21 would also increase the age on the purchase of e-cigarettes.

Tobacco 21 is beginning to have an impact on laws in a couple of states and at least 215 cities, according to their website.

"This is good evidence for state legislators to understand that there is broad support, even among teens for Tobacco 21 policies," Blatt said. "It's a bit tough when you have a patchwork of policies where you can't buy cigarettes if you are 19 in this county, but you can in the next county. It's much better if you have to be 21 in all counties."

The study was published in the journal Pediatrics.

Story source: Gia Miller, http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2017/06/19/Teens-pre-teens-support-increasing-smoking-age-to-21/7301497887031/

 

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