Your Child

Louisville Slugger Softball Bat Recall

1.30 to read

Just as softball season is swinging into high gear, the world’s most famous baseball bat maker is issuing a recall.

The Louisville Slugger OneX Fastpitch Softball Bat is recalled because the bat’s barrel can separate from the handle during use and strike people nearby.

The recalled bats include all OneX style bats. The composite bat has a white and grey shell with blue and yellow lettering. "Louisville Slugger oneX" appears twice on the barrel, in yellow in one place and in blue lettering on the other side.  The "X" is yellow in both places.  

Approximately 170 bat handle separations have been reported to the company. The company is aware of one report of a barrel from a broken bat hitting a player in the shin.  

There are about 13,000 bats affected by the recall.

The bats were sold nationwide at sporting goods, other retail stores and distributed to college amateur competitive softball teams from approximately May 2012 through February 2013 for about $350.

Consumers should immediately stop using the bat and contact Hillerich & Bradsby for a free replacement bat and the choice of an additional free item.

You can contact Hillerich & Bradsby at (800) 282-2287 from 8 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. ET Monday through Friday or online at www.slugger.com and click on Recall for more information.

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is still interested in receiving incident or injury reports that are either directly related to a product recall or involve a different hazard with the same product. You can contact them online at SaferProducts.gov to furnish information about your experience with the bat.

Louisville Slugger OneX Fastpitch Softball Bat

Your Child

Heavier Kids Eating Fewer Calories?

2.00 to read

You might think that all overweight kids eat more calories than thinner kids, but according to a new study, you’d be wrong.

Younger children who are overweight do consume more calories than their thinner peers, but older overweight kids may actually eat fewer calories than their healthy-weight counterparts.

"The message for society and parents is: Don't assume that a child who's overweight is overeating. Obesity isn't just a simple matter of eating more," said study author Asheley Cockrell Skinner, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of North Carolina, in Chapel Hill. "Be sympathetic. Overweight children reported eating fewer calories, and to lose weight, these kids have to eat even less. It's probably even harder for them to lose weight than we give them credit for."

The study included dietary information from nearly 13,000 children between the ages of 1 and 17. The information came from U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which was conducted from 2001 to 2008. The population included in this study is representative of the U.S. population.

The food-consumption data was collected on two separate days. Children and their parents were asked to recall what the child had eaten in the last 24 hours and how much they ate of any particular food. The researchers had a number of representative measuring devices to try to get the best approximation of portion size that they could.

In the younger kids researchers found that obese and overweight children did in fact eat more calories. For example, in 3- to 5-year-olds, overweight girls consumed an average of 1,721 calories a day compared to 1,578 calories a day for their healthy weight peers. In boys of the same age, the overweight group consumed 1,809 calories a day vs. 1,668 calories a day for the normal-weight children.

But the older obese and overweight children actually ate fewer calories than the thinner kids. Between the ages of 12 and 14, overweight girls consumed about 1,794 calories a day compared to 1,893 calories daily for normal-weight girls. In boys of the same age, the overweight young men consumed about 2,209 calories daily compared to 2,291 for normal-weight boys.

Why were these children still overweight or obese? The researchers believe that the overweight children were less active than their thinner counterparts.

"Overweight children tend to be less active," she said, but added that other factors are likely at play. "The body has complex reactions to how much you eat, when you eat and your activity levels. And, we just don't completely understand these reactions yet," she explained.

An variety of factors affect body weight. "Overweight children tend to be less active," she said, but added that other factors are likely at play. "The body has complex reactions to how much you eat, when you eat and your activity levels. And, we just don't completely understand these reactions yet," she explained.

Parents often worry that their children aren't eating enough, but a child will eat significantly less than an adult, and in general, "the child is usually eating what they need," she said.

Activity appears to play as important a role in childhood as it does in adulthood. Sitting at the computer or watching TV has taken the place of active outdoor endeavors. By exercising together, the whole family can benefit.

You can show an interest in any activities that your child likes. From ballet to biking, encourage your child to participate. 

Walking is one of the best exercises for losing weight and building stamina. Everyone benefits from breathing deeper, being out of doors, talking with each other and it's easier on the knnes than running. It’s a super way to get kids off the couch and moving. When children (and adults) are obese, walking is a great start to getting more fit.

Sports are a great way for kids to get active. If your child isn’t interested in traditional sports there are plenty of alternatives such as dance, tae-kwon-do, step aerobics, zumba etc. Sixty minutes of physical activity per day is recommended. It doesn't have to be all at once. You can break up the day into shorter segments as long as you get in a total of one hour of exercise. 

Diet is important but it needs to go hand in hand with physical activity. That’s something that every family can work on together.

Source: http://health.usnews.com/health-news/news/articles/2012/09/10/overweight-teens-typically-eat-

http://parentsforhealth.org/tips-how-to-get-kids-active

Your Child

Childhood Obesity; It’s a Family Affair

2.00 to read

Although there seems to be non-stop discussion about the influence modern day society has on our children, one fact remains the same. Parents and caregivers have the biggest impact on a child’s life. When it comes to helping obese children lose weight and lead healthier lives, it’s parents who decide what food is purchased, and how much activity a child gets. If parents are not available, then a caregiver makes those importance decisions.

For an obese child to have a real chance at losing weight and living a healthier life, parents, caregivers and other family members should be involved in treatment programs designed to help their children.

The American Heart Association released a scientific statement today on the role of parents, families and caregivers in the treatment of obese kids.

"In many cases, the adults in a family may be the most effective change agents to help obese children attain and maintain a healthier weight," Myles Faith, an associate professor of nutrition at the Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, said in an American Heart Association (AHA) news release.

"To do so, the adults may need to modify their own behavior and try some research-based strategies," added Faith, who is the chair of the writing group that published an AHA scientific statement in the Jan. 23 issue of Circulation.

But let’s be honest…. old habits are hard to break. That’s why the more people you have working together the more likely you’ll be successful in making the changes you want.  Most families dealing with obesity really want to help family members lose weight  – they often just need a better game plan to help guide them.

One of the most important messages to parents is that they need to lead by example. It is entirely unrealistic for children to change their food and physical activity behaviors on their own. Too often, during the week, family meals consist of high calorie-high / high-fat fast foods. Then the weekend is an all-you-can-eat buffet style breakfast and dinner.

Lack of exercise only adds to the difficulty in dropping unhealthy pounds.

Technology has gotten a lot of the blame for keeping kids in chairs or on couches, but it can also be beneficial. Computers and smart phones may be beneficial in self-monitoring and goal setting for children and their parents. Games such as “Dance Dance Revolution” along with “Wii Fit” and a host of others get kids and even adults up and moving.  In lieu of blaming technology for being a culprit, perhaps viewing it as an opportunity to reach children and teens in the medium they understand may be the best way to communicate healthful behaviors.

Faith adds “Teaching families to identify how many calories they take in from food, and burn during exercise, is a core component to most family treatment programs that have been studied.  Parents and children become more ‘calorie-literate’ in a sense, so they better understand how many calories are in a burger vs. apple vs. water bottle. This knowledge sets the stage for behavior change, and can be an eye opener for many parents.”

Faith and his colleagues identified a number of strategies that have been linked to better outcomes, including:

  • Working together as a family to identify specific behaviors that need to be changed.
  •  Setting clearly defined goals -- such as limiting TV viewing to no more than two hours per day -- and monitoring progress.
  •  Creating a home environment that encourages healthier choices, such as having fruit in the house instead of high-calorie desserts or snacks.
  •  Making sure parents commend children when they make progress, and don't criticize them if they do backslide. Instead, helping children identify ways to make different decisions if they're faced with the same kind of situation again.
  •  Never using food as a punishment or reward.
  •  Keeping track of progress toward goals.

"While these strategies were implemented by health care professionals in a treatment program, the psychological principles on which they are based provide sound guidance for families of obese children as well," Faith said.

A healthy life starts in infancy. For too many years, people just didn’t know much about the nutritional aspect of eating. You’re hungry-you eat. But now, there is an abundance of information, millions of studies that have been conducted, and a food’s calorie, fat, carbohydrate and sodium count is on every label or at your fingertips on the computer. The result of not paying attention to what we put in our mouths is having a devastating impact on families’ lives.

There are many ways to get up-to-date on your child's health. Pediatricians can be critical in the education of parents and caregivers in the optimum feeding and physical activity behaviors for raising healthy children.  Daycare centers, WIC and even grandparents can play a positive role in influencing health outcomes in children.

Denial and ignorance will not make obesity go away. Overweight and obese children seldom outgrow it and they carry that weight-and all its health consequences-into adulthood. Make health a priority for the entire family, and with education, support and good planning everyone will benefit now and for generations to come.

The American Academy of Pediatrics has more about childhood obesity and treatment at http://news.yahoo.com/parents-may-hold-key-treating-kids-obesity-2104138...

Sources: http://news.yahoo.com/parents-may-hold-key-treating-kids-obesity-2104138...http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/01/24/aha-childhood-obesity-needs-to-...

Your Child

Exercise Improves Thinking Skills in Overweight Kids

A new study says the more the kids exercised, the more the intelligence-test scores went up. An average increase of 3.8 points on scores in cognitive planning skills was noted in kids who exercised 40 minutes a day for three months, the researchers found.When overweight, sedentary kids start to exercise regularly, their ability to think, to plan and even to do math improves, a new study suggests.

In addition, exercise was linked to increased activity in the parts of the brain associated with complex thinking and self-control, according to brain imaging scans analyzed by the researchers. "This implies that chronic sedentary behavior is compromising children's ability and achievement," said lead researcher Catherine Davis, a clinical health psychologist at the Georgia Prevention Institute at Georgia Health Sciences University in Augusta. "We know that exercise is good for you, but we didn't have very good evidence [before this] that it would help children do better in school," said Davis. Although this study was done among overweight children, she believes that similar results would be seen in normal-weight kids. Davis speculates that these positive changes are a result of a combination of biological and environmental factors. "There are some neural growth factors that have been identified in mice that exercise," she said. These benefits may include more brain cells and more connections between them. But there are also social and environmental factors, she noted. "There's more stimulation when things are moving faster and when you're moving. So it is cognitively stimulating to move," Davis said. With one-third of U.S. children overweight, Davis thinks that exercise needs to become an essential part of children's lives. "Make sure your child has a balanced life -- not only that they study, but that they learn to take care of their bodies as well," she said. The report is published in the January issue of Health Psychology. For the study, Davis's team randomly assigned 171 overweight children 7 to 11 years old, to either 20 minutes or 40 minutes of vigorous exercise every day after school or to no exercise. The exercise program focused on fun and safety rather than competition and skill, and included running games, hula hoops and jump ropes. Researchers found it raised their heart rates to 79 percent of maximum, which is considered vigorous. The researchers evaluated the children using standard achievement tests known as the Cognitive Assessment System and Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Achievement III. Some children also had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of their brains. The MRIs found that children who exercised had increased activity in the so-called executive function area of the brain -- associated with self-control, planning, reasoning and abstract thought -- as well as the prefrontal cortex. The latter is the part of the brain linked with complex thinking and correct social behavior, the researchers noted. There was also decreased activity in an area of the brain that's behind the prefrontal cortex. The shift seems to be tied to faster developing of cognitive skills, Davis said. In addition, the more the kids exercised, the more the intelligence-test scores went up. An average increase of 3.8 points on scores in cognitive planning skills was noted in kids who exercised 40 minutes a day for three months, the researchers found. Children who exercised 20 minutes a day experienced smaller gains. There were also improvements in math skills, but not reading ability. "The finding of improved math achievement is remarkable, given that no academic instruction was provided, and suggests that a longer intervention period may result in more benefit," the researchers said. Commenting on the study, Samantha Heller, a dietitian, nutritionist and exercise physiologist, said: "Take a bunch of kids, put them outside, give them some balls, jump ropes and street chalk, and they will be running, jumping and playing hopscotch in no time." They become happier, more energetic, smarter kids, she said. "Children's bodies know intuitively that exercise is essential for healthy brain and body function. But when we deny children their natural instincts and allow them to stultify in front of a TV or computer, they become lethargic and moody," Heller said, adding that sedentary kids are also prone to being overweight and may do poorly in school. "It seems a no-brainer to me that for kids' brains to be healthy, they should be encouraged to participate in regular exercise and given the time and place for it," Heller concluded. "We need to turn off the computers, TVs, cell phones and iPads and let kids do what they do naturally: Run around and play."

Your Child

Overweight Pals Eat More When They’re Together

Overweight children and teenagers may eat more when they have a snack with an overweight friend rather than a thinner peer, a new study suggests. The findings, reported in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, highlight the role of friends' influence in how much kids eat and, possibly, in their weight control.

The study involved nine-to 15-year-olds. Researchers found that all kids, regardless of their weight, tended to eat more when they had the chance to snack with a friend than when they were with a peer they did not know. But the biggest calorie intakes were seen when an overweight child snacked with an overweight friend. It's not surprising that children eat more when they are with friends instead of strangers, according to lead researcher Dr. Sarah-Jean Salvy, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the State University of New York at Buffalo. The same pattern has been found in adults, Salvy said. This, she explained, may be partly because people are more self-conscious around strangers, and partly because friends act as "permission-givers." For the study, Salvy and her colleagues had 23 overweight and 42 normal-weight children and teens spend 45 minutes with either a friend or an unfamiliar peer. Each pair was given games, puzzles and books for entertainment, along with bowls of chips, cookies, carrots and grapes. Overall, the researchers found, pairs of friends downed more calories than did unacquainted pairs. And overweight friends consumed the most — 738 calories, on average, versus 444 calories when an overweight child was paired with normal-weight friend. Normal-weight kids consumed an average of about 500 calories when paired with a friend, regardless of the friend's weight. When it comes to children and teens, it's known that many follow their friends' lead in deciding whether to smoke or drink. The current findings, Salvy said, suggest that kids' eating habits are also "largely determined by their social network." The good side of that, according to Salvy, is that helping one child make healthy changes may end up influencing his or her friends as well. She said her research interest now is to see whether there is in fact such a "contagion effect" on friends' eating habits.

Your Child

Tonsillectomy Linked to Excess Weight Gain in Children

Children who have their tonsils removed with or without the removal of their adenoids are at increased risk for becoming overweight in the years after surgery.Children who have their tonsils removed with or without the removal of their adenoids are at increased risk for becoming overweight in the years after surgery according to a report in the journal Pediatrics. Researchers from the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment analyzed data from nearly 4,000 children in the Dutch Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy (PIAMA) birth cohort study.

Annual parental questionnaires were used to assess weight, tonsillectomy status and other factors. In addition, the height and weight of all subjects at 8 years of age was assessed by the researchers. Researchers found that tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy significantly increased the odds of being overweight and obese at 8 years by 61 percent and 136 percent, respectively. Adenoidectomy alone did not increase the risk of becoming overweight, but id did increase the risk of obesity by 94 percent. "Longitudinal data on weight and height in the years before and after surgery," the authors note, "suggest that (adeno) tonsillectomy forms a turning point between a period of growth faltering and a period of catch-up growth," which may explain the increased risk of becoming overweight after the operation. Based on these findings, the authors recommend that dietary and lifestyle advice be given to parents whose children are undergoing tonsillectomy. Growth monitoring after surgery is key to ensure that catch-up growth occurs within healthy limits, they add.

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Your Child

Kids and Caffeine

2.00 to read

While sipping on a coffee-laced Frappuccino, I’m reading about a current study on caffeine and kids. It made me think about my own dependence on caffeine and when it started. For as long as I can remember, my parents would drink several cups of coffee in the morning before going to work, and even as late as right before they retired for the night.  I suspect my mother had a cup while I was busy being born.

I can’t remember exactly when I joined the family coffee drinking ritual, but I know I was pretty young.  Fall and winter demanded hot steaming cups of coffee and iced coffee helped cool the torturous Texas summers. Spring was a combination of both. Sometimes I think that by now, there’s probably coffee bean residue percolating in my blood stream. 

I kind of wish that I’d never started drinking coffee, because it’s the caffeine I really crave- not necessarily the taste of the brew.  When I’ve tried to quit, my body and mind rebels with headaches and bad attitudes. Which brings me back to the study on kids and caffeine.

Researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that children and teens are now getting less caffeine from soda, but more from caffeine-heavy energy drinks and coffee.

"You might expect that caffeine intake decreased, since so much of the caffeine kids drink comes from soda," said the study's lead author, Amy Branum, a statistician at the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics. "But what we saw is that these decreases in soda were offset by increases in coffee and energy drinks."

Not too long ago, energy drinks were just a fad, something that was more likely to give you the shakes than boost your energy level. That was before they were tweaked and bottled or canned in fruity flavors, sugary beverages and clever advertising. Once kids (and adults) got a taste of the “new and improved” tasty stimulates, the caffeinated beverages began to become a part of every day life – at least Monday through Friday when school and work beckoned.

"In a very short time, they have gone from basically contributing nothing to 6 percent of total caffeine intake," Branum said.

“Energy drinks have more caffeine than soda,. That's their claim to fame," she said. "That's what they're marketed for."

So, what effect does excessive caffeine intake have on our kids? Scientists are not sure yet. There are concerns and a lot of questions about the possible adverse consequences for kids who are still developing.  Caffeine addiction, obesity from sugar heavy beverages, high blood pressure, rapid heart beats and anxiety are some of the side –effects researchers are exploring. 

Using data from the 1999 to 2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, Branum's team estimated that 73 percent of American children consume some level of caffeine each day.

Although much of their caffeine still comes from soda, the proportion has decreased from 62 percent to 38 percent. At the same time, the amount of caffeine kids get from coffee rose from 10 percent in 2000 to 24 percent in 2010, the researchers found.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) states that energy drinks are never appropriate for children or adolescents and in general, caffeine-containing beverages, including soda, should be avoided. The AAP suggests that children should drink water or moderate amounts of juice instead.

The genie is probably out of the preverbal bottle as far as some adolescents and college-aged kids are concerned.  Although, if they are more aware of the possible health risks associated with excessive caffeinated beverages, they may decide to look at healthier energy producing sources such as exercise, meditation and more rest.

Where parents can have the most influence is with their younger children.  Refraining from purchasing caffeinated products (there’s even “energy” gum) and keeping them out of the home is a good first step.

And by all means, avoid introducing your kids to coffee at a young age. It might seem kind of cute, but twenty years down the road, they may wish you hadn’t slid that first cup of java their way.

The report was published in the February edition of the online journal Pediatrics.

Sources: Steven Reinberg,  http://www.webmd.com/parenting/news/20140210/energy-drinks-coffee-increasing-sources-of-caffeine-for-kids-cdc-says

www.aap.org

Your Child

Vaccine Proves Effective Against “Superbugs”

2:00

A new study takes a deeper look at the benefits of the pneumococcal vaccine for children. The vaccine helps children avoid the suffering and danger of ear infections, meningitis and pneumonia.

The vaccine was first used in children in 2010. In this study, researchers found that not only are vaccinated children experiencing fewer infections, but they may also be protected from antibiotic-resistant “superbugs.”

Since the vaccine has been in use, it has been associated with a 62 percent reduction of drug-resistant infections of bacterial pneumonia, meningitis and bloodstream infections for children under 5.

"The vaccine is an important tool against antibiotic resistance," said lead researcher Sara Tomczyk, an epidemic intelligence service officer in the Respiratory Diseases Branch of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"Along with appropriate antibiotic use, it is part of the solution to protecting ourselves against the growing threat of antibiotic resistance," she added.

As more and more adults and children overuse antibiotics, antibiotic-resistant bacteria become especially worrisome. Traditional drugs used to treat infections begin to have little effect on the bacteria. These “superbugs” can produce uncontrollable infection that can lead to death.

The good news is that the pneumococcal vaccine may have lessened the danger. According to Tomczyk, more than 4,400 cases of antibiotic-resistant, invasive pneumococcal disease were prevented between 2010 and 2013.

"Not only does this vaccine prevent pneumococcal infection, which means fewer antibiotics are prescribed, but it also prevents antibiotic-resistant infections," she added.

Although we’re not at 100 percent compliance, 85 percent of U.S. children are receiving the vaccine. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine is given in four doses, at 2, 4 and 6 months of age and at 12 through 15 months.

Tomczyk said the vaccine has been so effective that the U.S. government's Healthy People 2020 goal of reducing bacteria-resistant pneumococcal disease from 9.3 to 6 cases per 100,000 children was achieved nine years early and has since dropped to 3.5 cases per 100,000.

The vaccine is not only recommended for children, but adults as well. One dose is recommended for all adults 65 and older, followed by a dose of the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine six to 12 months later.

There are more than 90 types of pneumococcal bacteria. The pneumococcal conjugate vaccine protects against 13 of the most common severe pneumococcal infections among children, while the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine protects against 23 types of pneumococcal bacteria, including those most likely to cause serious disease, which is why both are recommended for older adults.

Dr. Adriana Cadilla, a pediatrician at Miami Children's Hospital, said, "It's wonderful news that we have proof that the vaccine works as well as it does."

It has clearly reduced antibiotic-resistant pneumococcal disease, she added. "It seems to be doing a great job. It is something parents should make sure their children have."

The pneumococcal vaccine is currently recommended for all children age 5 and younger. Pneumococcal bacteria can cause ear infections, pneumonia and meningitis. It is the most common vaccine-preventable bacterial cause of death, the researchers noted.

Source: Steven Reinberg, http://www.webmd.com/children/vaccines/news/20141010/common-childhood-vaccine-cuts-superbug-infection-study?

Your Child

Bullies, Most Popular Kids in School

2.00 to read

It’s really not surprising to read the results of a new study linking bullies and popularity. If bullying didn’t get the reaction the person who is bullying wanted (popularity) it wouldn’t be the problem it is. 

For the study, researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles, surveyed nearly 1,900 students in 99 classes at 11 Los Angeles middle schools. The surveys, conducted at different points during grades 7 and 8, asked the participants to name the students who were considered the "coolest" and the ones who were bullies.

Participants were also asked to name the most aggressive students. Results showed that the same children named as the “coolest”, or most popular, were the same ones who were named as most aggressive. The findings linked the popularity of kids to bullying.

"The ones who are cool bully more, and the ones who bully more are seen as cool," study lead author Jaana Juvonen, a professor of psychology, said in a UCLA news release. "What was particularly interesting was that the form of aggression, whether highly visible and clearly confrontational or not, did not matter. Pushing or shoving and gossiping worked the same for boys and girls."

Many schools are now providing anti-bullying programs, but for those to be effective, the study suggests that the programs need to be subtle and sophisticated.

"A simple message, such as 'bullying is not tolerated,' is not likely to be very effective" when bullying often increases a student's popularity, Juvonen noted in the news release.

She suggested that effective anti-bullying programs might need to be aimed at the bystanders, who play an important role and can either encourage or discourage bullying. Bystanders need to be made aware of the harm that bullying can do, she said.

Do all kids who bully mean to be hurtful? Not necessarily. Sometimes they are seeking a way to fit in. Their lives might be driven by insecurity and fear and the idea of not being part of the “cool” group is enough for them to strike first before being stricken. They may simply think they are being funny.  If they can make someone laugh, they’re in.

Unfortunately, the laughter isn’t a two way street.  The child being laughed at doesn’t get the benefit of fitting in with the kids laughing, instead they get to be humiliated and left to pick up the pieces of their shattered self-esteem.

Do some bullies know exactly what they are doing to others? Yes, and they like it.  They get exactly the reaction they want. Another child’s feelings are hurt and the bully feels superior. They have validation that they are powerful.  They get that validation from others who support them by either saying or doing nothing. They are rewarded when others join in the tormenting or by acceptance from others who laugh and play along. People bully because they get something they want from it.

Kids who go along with bullying are often afraid they will become the next target if they don’t. And quite frankly, that’s likely to happen. 

How is bullying stopped?  Many experts who work in the child protection and development field are working on those solutions right now.  There are, currently, good programs set up in schools that are helping to reduce bullying and giving a voice to children who have or are being bullied. Sometimes personal testimonials can enlighten others to the damage that bullying does. 

I think an important key is reaching the bystanders; kids who are afraid or too nervous to say or do anything when they witness bullying.  A bully has no power if they don’t have support. When the numbers turn in the other direction and more kids stand up to them than stand by them, they’ll think twice before lashing out. 

Popularity is a strange thing. It’s often fleeting. You can be at the top of the list one day and the bottom the next. You can also be at the bottom and rise to the top in an unexpected moment. That holds true for people at any age.

Personally, I think that there are far more children who are compassionate, empathetic, loving and kind than those who get their self-value from hurting others.

The former are thoughtful kids who need guidance to help them band together and take a stand. They need leaders who understand what they are up against and can offer real life solutions to real life situations. Without support, bullies just aren’t very “cool.”

The study was released online in advance of publication in an upcoming print issue of the Journal of Youth and Adolescence.

Source: http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=672882

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