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Your Child

Talking to Your Child About Tragic News Events

2:00

Another tragedy has taken place, this time a terrorist attack in Paris, France.  Children, adolescents and adults have lost their lives or been seriously injured while out for an evening of fun, errands or romance.  Media outlets have been covering the events, sometimes showing graphic video or photos from the bloody scenes.

When children view these images or hear the stories, they can become scared and worried that the same thing will happen to them. 

Whenever catastrophic local, national or global events take place, it’s easy to assume that your child doesn’t really know what is going on or understand the gravity. But, in this age of instant and abundant information, they most likely do. Children are very sensitive to their parents and friends’ feelings. They are more tuned in than you might think.

Children sense when their parents are really worried, whether they're watching the news or talking about it with others. No matter what children know about a crisis, it's especially disconcerting for them to realize that their parents are scared, angry or shocked.

When bad things happen, children want to know what is going on.  It doesn’t have to be an international event. Local tragedies such as a flood, tornado, shooting, kidnapping, suicide, house fire or car wreck can be more frightening to children than events taking place across the world or in another state.

So, how do you talk with your child about such unhappy and threatening things? I’ve turned to Mr. Rogers to share with you his calming and thoughtful insights. The first time he addressed this topic was after Robert Kennedy’s assassination. Parents and educators turned to him for guidance then and his advice still holds true today.

In times of crisis, children want to know, "Who will take care of me?" They're dependent on adults for their survival and security. They're naturally self-centered. Their world is small and their life experience is limited. They need to hear very clearly that their parents are doing all they can to take care of them and to keep them safe. They also need to know that people in the government, in their community and in the world, and other people they don't even know, are working hard to keep them safe, too.

One of the ways young children express feelings is through play. However, sometimes events that happen are violent, so parents need to be nearby to redirect play if it takes a turn in that direction. More nurturing play can help children process the different activities and needs that happen around certain types of events. Play involving being a doctor or nurse in a hospital setting or creating a pretend meal for emergency workers or families can help children understand that there are good people and helpful actions that also take place when something bad happens.

When children are scared and anxious, they might become more dependent, clingy, and afraid to go to bed at night. Whining, aggressive behavior, or toilet accidents may be their way of asking for more comfort from the important adults in their lives. Little by little, as we adults around them become more confident, hopeful and secure, our children can experience a more calming sense of security.

When shocking event happens, it’s easy to get drawn into watching the news for hours and hours. Think back to 9-11 when there was non-stop coverage for days with repeated video of the towers being hit and falling. It created post-traumatic stress disorder, nation-wide. As hard as it is for adults to assimilate, it’s even harder for children. Once you have the information, turn the TV off or find something else for your kids to watch. Monitor their online activity as well to see if they are seeing too much graphic information or too many stories of “What if this happened here?”

Exposing ourselves to so many tragedies can make us feel hopeless, insecure, and even depressed, feelings that even young children can sense. We help our children-and ourselves-if we're able to limit our own television viewing. Our children need us to spend time with them-away from the frightening images on the screen.

Limiting our child’s media exposure doesn’t mean we don’t talk about what has happened with them.

Even if we wanted to, it would be impossible to give our children all the reasons for such things as war, terrorists, abuse, murders, fires, hurricanes, and earthquakes. If very young children ask questions, our best answer may be to ask them, "What do you think happened?" If the answer is, "I don't know," then the simplest reply might be something like, "I'm sad about the news, and I'm worried. But I love you, and I'll take care of you."

If we don't let children know it's okay to feel sad and scared, they may try to hide those feelings or think something is wrong with them whenever they do feel that way. They certainly don't need details of what's making us sad or scared, but if we can help them accept their own feelings as natural and normal, their feelings will be much more manageable for them.

Your child’s age and emotional IQ should be your guide on how much detail you go into when discussing tragic events. Very young children do not need a lot of detail. Children 7 and under are most concerned with safety. They need to know that you and they are secure. That’s why it important to keep the TV at a minimum for kids in this age group. They can identify strongly to pictures of other young children in peril or crying because they’ve lost someone dear to them. At this age, kids are most concerned with separation from you.  Assure them that you are watching out for them and will protect them.

Children between the ages of 8 and 12 will often notice the morality of events.  You may have to explain the basics of prejudice, bias, and civil and religious strife. But be careful about making generalizations, since kids will take you at your word. This is a good time to ask them what they know, since they'll probably have gotten their information from friends, and you may have to correct facts. This age group will most likely be online more. While it’s still important to keep news viewing under control, online viewing and searching should be monitored as well. It’s a good age to discuss lots of views and opinions about events. Read stories together and then ask them what they think.

Teens will probably get their news independently of you. Talking to them can offer great insights into their developing senses of justice and morality. It will also give you the opportunity to throw your own insights into the mix, but don’t dismiss their opinions or insights just because they may not be the same as yours. They will shut down communication quickly if they feel their ideas are not being valued.  Discuss the ways that different media covers events. Again, ask them what they think.

Having to discuss tragic or scary events with our children isn’t new. Generations of parents have had to address various topics from volcano eruptions that wiped out an entire city to the Holocaust to the cold war. But how we get our information has changed dramatically. Media in one form or another is prolific with gory images and misinformation available at the touch of finger. So parents have to react quicker and with more assurance and details than they would probably like. But that’s what we do. We protect our children in all ways, as best we can, with loving and clear information.

Sources:  http://pbskids.org/rogers//parentsteachers/special/scarynews-thoughts.html

Carolyn Knorr, https://www.commonsensemedia.org/blog/explaining-the-news-to-our-kids

 

Your Child

Recall: CLIF Bars, Due to Possible Nut Allergens

2:00

If your child has a nut allergy, and eats CLIF bars, they could accidently ingest one of an assortment of nuts that may have slipped through the manufacturing process.

CLIF Bar and Company is voluntarily recalling 12 of its products that are primarily marketed for children because they may contain several nut allergens.

The bars might contain peanuts, walnuts, almonds, hazelnuts, cashews, Brazil nuts, macadamia nuts, pecans and coconut.

As you know, serious or life-threatening allergic reactions are possible for those with severe allergy to nuts or peanuts. As this time, there have been no reports of illness from this recall.

The bars were sold online and at retail stores throughout the United States. The affected products can be identified by the “Best By” date code found on the back of the individual packaging. You can check the lot codes below:

  • CLIF BUILDER'S 18-count Variety Pack Chocolate Peanut Butter and Chocolate Mint: Lot Code FROM: 24MAR16M; Lot Code TO: 08FEB18M
  • CLIF Kid Zbar Protein 30-count Variety Pack -- Lot Code FROM: 31MAY16M; Lot Code TO: 15OCT17M
  • CLIF BUILDER'S Chocolate Mint 12-count -- Lot Code FROM: 05APR16M3; Lot Code TO: 23APR18M3
  • CLIF BUILDER'S Chocolate Mint 6-pack -- Lot Code FROM: 05APR16M3; Lot Code TO: 23APR18M3 
  • CLIF BUILDER'S Chocolate Mint 7-pack -- Lot Code FROM: 05APR16M3; Lot Code TO: 23APR18M3 
  • CLIF BUILDER'S Snack Size Chocolate Mint 200-count -- Lot Code FROM: 05APR16M3; Lot Code TO: 23APR18M3 
  • CLIF Kid Zbar Protein Chocolate Chip 10-pack -- Lot Code FROM: 05APR16M3; Lot Code TO: 23APR18M3 
  • CLIF Kid Zbar Protein Chocolate Chip 150-count -- Lot Code FROM: 05APR16M3; Lot Code TO: 23APR18M3 
  • CLIF Kid Zbar Protein Chocolate Chip 5-pack -- Lot Code FROM: 05APR16M3; Lot Code TO: 23APR18M3 
  • CLIF Kid Zbar Protein Chocolate Mint 10-pack -- Lot Code FROM: 05APR16M3; Lot Code TO: 23APR18M3 
  • CLIF Kid Zbar Protein Chocolate Mint 150-count -- Lot Code FROM: 05APR16M3; Lot Code TO: 23APR18M3 
  • CLIF Kid Zbar Protein Chocolate Mint 5-pack -- Lot Code FROM: 05APR16M3; Lot Code TO: 23APR18M3 

All other CLIF Bar and Company products are not affected by this recall.

The company is asking people to return the products to where they bought them for a refund or exchange. People with questions can call 866-526-1970 or visit the company’s website here.

Story source: Brunilda Nazario, MD http://www.webmd.com/diet/news/20170706/clif-bars-recall

http://www.clifbar.com/text/june-2017-recall

Your Child

Be an Involved Parent

2.00 to read

Millions of kids are back in school. For some it will be the start of a long educational journey, while others have already been in the system and are moving up to the next grade. Parents expect their children’s teachers to educate their kids, supervise their safety and keep them abreast of any changes or concerns they may see in their child’s behavior. Fair enough.

But what obligations should a parent have to their child’s education and school life? Many send their kids off to school and that’s that. Studies have shown and common sense tells you that the more involved a parent is with a child’s education at home and in school; the better a child learns and progresses.

Research has shown that children of involved parents are absent less frequently, behave better, make better grades from pre-school through high school and go farther in school.

They are often more socially mature and have a better sense of who they are.

The benefits don’t stop at school. A home environment that encourages learning is more important than parents' income, education level, or cultural background. By actively participating in their child's education at home and in school, parents send some critical messages to their child; they're demonstrating their interest in his/her activities and reinforcing the idea that school is valuable.

Not every parent has a lot of time they can spend with their child. The reality is that there are many single parent families. There are children who are being raised by a relative and children who are in foster care. Some schools are working on developing and implementing more flexible schedules that offer working parents options to spend extra time with their kids.

The National Education Association recommends some specific ways for parents to become more involved in their child's education.

At home:

- Read to your child. Reading aloud is the most important activity that parents can do to increase their child's chance of reading success

- Discuss the books and stories you read to your child

- Help your child organize his/her time

- Limit television viewing on school nights

- Talk to your child regularly about what's going on in school

- Check homework every night

Other tips for helping your child succeed in school come from teachers themselves.

- Teach your child to be prepared. No more excuses for late or not turned in homework

- Reinforce the importance of your child’s education. Whether you have a college degree, a high school education or dropped out let your child know that they are expected to complete school and continue with their education by either going to college or a trade school.

- Discuss newsworthy current events, and what is going on in your neighborhood, religious institution or pop culture. Listen to your child’s opinions with an open mind. Share your daily experiences in age appropriate language. The earlier a child feels an integral part of the family, the more they learn to value family, friends and others. Education includes a social awareness. 

- Go directly to the teacher of you have questions about your child’s progress or lack their of in school. Establish a good relationship with all your child’s teachers. Know their names and what they expect form your child. Let them know what you expect of them.

- Don’t try to get your child out of detention. Allow your child to accept the consequences of their behavior. Too many parents make excuses for their children’s bad behavior instead of facing it head on. Bailing your child out takes away their ability to learn responsibility. It can become an ugly habit and deprive your child of the maturity he or she will need to handle difficult situations. We all know there will be plenty of difficult times in everybody's lives. 

- Implement a consistent homework routine that focuses on relearning the day’s lessons.

- Respond to your school’s email and phone calls. Your child’s teacher is busy also and they wouldn’t be contacting you unless it was important. If you have concerns don’t wait to be contacted, be the one to reach out first.

- Volunteer. If at all possible volunteer to help with school or sports events. Showing your child that you are invested in them is the best way to teach them about unconditional love and sacrifice. Just knowing you care enough to give up some of your own precious time for them teaches them the true meaning of “I’ll always be there for you.”

When parents contribute effort and time, they have the opportunity to interact with teachers, administrators, and other parents. They can learn first-hand about the daily activities and the social culture of the school, both of which help them understand what their child's life is like.

Not every parent can be available for every school meeting or event. If you can’t make it, see if another family member or a close friend can be there in your place. For the 9 to 10 months that a child is in school – that is their world. Be a part of it, you’ll be glad you did and even if you get a little push back from your child, they’ll remember how much you cared when they're older and have kids of their own.

Sources: Anita Gurian PhD, http://www.aboutourkids.org/articles/involved_parents_hidden_resource_in_their_children039s_education

Pete Mason,  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/pete-mason/advice-from-teachers-to-p_b_3819530.html

Your Child

How Much Pizza is Too Much?

2:00

Just about everyone loves pizza. These days, there are enough specialty toppings to satisfy even the pickiest of eaters. So, it’s understandable that people don’t like to hear or read anything negative about America’s favorite fast food.

 But… and where pizza is concerned, there is always a but… kids that consume too much pizza – notice I said too much not any- are not only more likely to pack on the extra pounds, but consume more fat and sodium than is recommended for healthy diets.

Researchers behind a new study from the Health Policy Center at the Institute of Health Research and Policy at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), examined dietary recall data from children and adolescents aged 2-19 who took part in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2003 and 2010.

During those years, children between the ages of 2 and 11 took in fewer calories from pizza by 25 percent. Among teenagers, who actually ate more pizza than the younger group, there was also a decline in intake calories from pizza.  Good news so far.

However, looking at the calorie intake from pizza during 2009 to 2010, pizza made up 22% of the total calorie intake among children and 26% of adolescents' calorie intake on the days when it was eaten.

The younger children took in an additional 84 calories, 3 g of saturated fat and 134 mg of sodium on days that they ate pizza, compared with pizza-free days.

For adolescents the count was substantially higher. Pizza days meant an extra 230 calories, 5 g of saturated fat and 484 mg of sodium - 24% and 21% of their recommended daily intake. Not so good news.

Pizza as a snack between meals had the biggest impact on the children’s diet. Children took in an extra 202 calories and teens an extra 365 calories in addition to their regular meals. Ouch.

It’s really no surprise that kids (and adults) rarely eat less of other foods during pizza snack days to compensate for the extra calories, fat and sodium – we just usually don’t.

Researchers also noted that calorie intake from school cafeterias was about the same on pizza days as it was on non-pizza days. They believe the reason for that is that most school cafeteria food is similarly high in calories. In 2015, that may be changing with new school food policies. Let’s hope so anyway.

Pizza in and of itself isn’t necessarily a bad food choice-depending on where it comes from. Homemade pizza can be lower in calories, fat and sodium. You get to decide what kind of crust is used and can substitute lower fat and sodium ingredients to build your own healthier meal. Plus, it taste good!

Because of its huge influence on the diet of American youths, the authors suggest that pizza should be specifically addressed as part of nutritional counseling.

"Curbing pizza consumption alone isn't enough to significantly reduce the adverse dietary effects of pizza. It's a very common and convenient food, so improving the nutritional content of pizza, in addition to reducing the amount of pizza eaten, could help lessen its negative nutritional impact." Said lead author Lisa Powell, who is professor of health policy and administration in the UIC School of Public Health.

Typical fast-food pizza is packed with sodium, fat and calories. This study simply points out that it’s easy to overload on it because it’s convenient and not very expensive. But, it can have a devastating affect on kid’s health when not eaten sensibly. The extra fat, salt and calories add up to more weight, higher cholesterol, higher blood pressure and diabetes. Not anything you really want for your kids or yourself.

The study was recently published in the journal Pediatrics.

Source: David McNamee, http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/288252.php

Your Child

Lawn Mower Safety Rules Haven’t Prevented Kid's Injuries

2:00

Spring, summer and fall are the times of year when you are most likely to hear the monotonous hum of mower blades echoing throughout neighborhoods.

It’s often the first job a young boy or girl acquires to earn a little extra money, but lawn mowing can come with high risk of injuries when kids and parents don’t follow some simple guidelines.

Despite recommendations presented by AAP, the incidence of lawn mower-related injuries in children has remained unchanged over the last two to three decades.

From 2004-’13, an average of 9,351 youths ages 20 years and younger suffered lawn mower-related injuries each year, according to a review of data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

About one-third of the wounds occurred in children younger than 12. Two age groups sustained the most injuries, 3 years old and 16 years old and predominately male.

Areas of the body most commonly injured involved hand/fingers ((30%), lower extremity (17%) and face/eye (14%). Amputations and fractures combined accounted for 12.5% of injuries and were more likely to require hospitalization.

Although the incidence of injuries caused by ride-on mowers was 2.5 times higher than those caused by walk-behind mowers, the type of mower was not specified in over 70% of cases, making a true determination of relative risk nearly impossible.   

While fractures and amputations are the most dramatic injuries, they certainly are not the only ones reported. An analysis of NEISS data from 1990-2004 showed the majority of lawn mower injuries were cuts, other soft-tissue injuries and burns.

Also reported in the study were foreign body injuries. It’s hard to imagine, but the rotation of the blades on a typical 26-inch riding lawn mower is similar to the energy required to fire a bullet through the engine block of an automobile, according to the authors. The force certainly is enough to impale objects into a child’s body, even from a good distance away.  

The AAP warns that kids and parents should be aware of the precautions one should take before and during mowing to keep everyone safer.

Here are some mower-safety tips from the AAP:

•       Before learning how to mow the lawn, your child should show the maturity, good judgment, strength and coordination that the job requires. Kids should be at least 12 years of age to operate a walk-behind power mower or hand mower safely and 16 years of age to operate a riding lawn mower safely.

•       Children should be supervised until you are sure he or she can handle the job alone.

•       Wear sturdy closed-toe shoes with slip-proof soles, close-fitting clothes, safety goggles or glasses with side shields, and hearing protection.

•       Watch for objects that could be picked up and thrown by the mower blades, as well as hidden dangers. Tall grass can hide objects, holes or bumps. Use caution when approaching corners, trees or anything that might block your view.

•       If the mower strikes an object, stop, turn the mower off, and inspect the mower. If it is damaged, do not use it until it has been repaired.

•       Do not pull the mower backwards or mow in reverse unless absolutely necessary, and carefully look for children behind you when you mow in reverse.

•       Use extra caution when mowing a slope.

•       When a walk-behind mower is used, mow across the face of slopes, not up and down, to avoid slipping under the mower and into the blades.

•       With a riding mower, mow up and down slopes, not across, to avoid tipping over.

•       Keep in mind that lawn trimmers also can throw objects at high speed.

•       Remain aware of where children are and do not allow them near the area where you are working. Children tend to be attracted to mowers in use.

Stop the engine and allow it to cool before refueling. Always turn off the mower and wait for the blades to stop completely before:

•       Crossing gravel paths, roads or other areas

•       Removing the grass catcher

•       Unclogging the discharge chute

•       Walking away from the mower

Some of the most heartbreaking accidents occur when small children – even infants- are allowed to “ride along” while their parents or grandparents are using a riding mower or small tractor.  U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission statistics show that each year, 800 children are run over by riding mowers or small tractors and more than 600 of those incidents result in amputation; 75 people are killed, and 20,000 injured; one in five deaths involves a child. For children under age 10, major limb loss is most commonly caused by lawn mowers. Never allow a child on a lawn mower or small tractor while you’re using it.

Mowing can be fun, a good source of income for adolescents and a help to families; so make sure to give an ounce of prevention to avoid having to receive a pound of cure.  

Story sources: http://www.aappublications.org/news/2016/08/11/LawnMowers081116

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/safety-prevention/at-home/Pages/Lawnmower-Safety.aspx

Your Child

More Kids Suffering ACL Injuries

2:00

Kids involved in sports like soccer, basketball and football are increasing their odds of damaging their knees, according to a new study.

A common knee injury — an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear — has steadily increased among 6- to 18-year-olds in the United States, rising more than 2 percent a year over the last two decades, researchers report.

These injuries peak in high school, said lead researcher Dr. Nicholas Beck, an orthopedic surgery resident at the University of Minnesota. Girls have a higher rate of ACL injuries, Beck added.

Sports like soccer and basketball often require the child to pivot or cut back and forth, putting stress on their ACL and risking a tear.  Contact sports like football can further increase the risk. But ACL tears can occur in tennis and volleyball, too.

The study didn’t look at why the injuries are on the rise, but co-author, Dr. Marc Tompkins, an assistant professor of orthopedic surgery at the University of Minnesota, has a theory.

“One potential cause is the year-round sports specialization that is occurring in kids at an earlier age,” Tompkins said.

Instead of playing a variety of sports and using different muscle groups, many kids are focusing on just one sport creating muscle fatigue and an increase for injury, Tompkins explained.

“Another potential cause is that children as athletes play with more intensity and force than 20 years ago, which may put the body at increased risk of injury,” he added.

The numbers of girls experiencing ACL tears are rising because their sports participation numbers are up.

Beck hopes this study will increase awareness of ACL tears in young athletes and promote interest in prevention programs or developing athletic participation guidelines.

The anterior cruciate ligament sits in the center of the front of the knee. It’s one of the ligaments that holds the knee bones together. When it tears, the ligament splits into two, causing knee instability, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

“ACL injuries are serious in the short term because they generally require six months’ to a year’s worth of hard recovery work before going back to sports. And even then it often takes longer to get back to pre-injury function,” Tompkins said.

“ACL injuries are serious in the long term, too, because we know that even if they recover well with or without surgery, the risk of developing arthritis in the injured knee is higher than before the injury,” he added.

Some sports medicine specialist say there are ways to reduce injuries among young athletes, by having coaches teach good running techniques that promote improved function and agility.

Children participating in sports can also benefit from flexibility and stretching programs.

The researchers found that girls of all ages experienced a significant increase in the incidence of ACL tears over 20 years. In boys, however, only those aged 15 to 16 showed such an increase.

The report was published online journal Pediatrics.

Story source: Steven Reinberg, http://www.cbsnews.com/news/acl-tears-on-the-rise-among-kids-especially-girls/

Your Child

HPV Vaccine: More Effective Than Thought

1:45

A study out of New Mexico finds that the vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, which doctors believe causes most cases of cervical cancer, could be much more effective than previously thought.

"After eight years of vaccination, the reduction in the incidence of cervical neoplasia [abnormal growth of cells], including pre-cancers, have been reduced approximately 50 percent. This is greater than what was expected -- that's pretty exciting," said lead researcher Cosette Wheeler. She is a professor of pathology and obstetrics and gynecology at the University of New Mexico, in Albuquerque.

Researchers also found that one or two doses of the vaccine may provide as much protection as the recommended three.

"Right now, the recommendation is three doses for girls and boys before the 13th birthday, so that you are protected before you become exposed," Wheeler explained.

"People thought that three doses of vaccine were necessary, but there's a lot of people who are getting one and two doses, and people are getting protection from one or two doses," she said.

Another benefit is that the vaccines protect against more types of HPV than they were designed to do, noted Wheeler.

Other studies have pointed to the effectiveness of the vaccine, but this is the first study to show declines in precancerous lesions across a large population.

This study even took into account changes in Pap test screening over the last 10 years.

In 2009, the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology said most women under 21 do not need Pap test screening and recommended longer times between screening. In 2012, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force said women, regardless of age, do not need to get screened more than every three years, Wheeler said.

If these changes were not taken into account, the effect of the vaccine would appear even greater than it already is, because it would assume that more women were being screened than actually were, she said.

"Parents and doctors should pay attention. These vaccines are highly efficacious," Wheeler said.

Cervical cancer can take decades to develop so it’s important to protect children before they become sexually active.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that the HPV vaccine be given to vaccine is preteen boys and girls at age 11 or 12 so they are protected before ever being exposed to the virus. The HPV vaccine also produces a more robust immune response during the preteen years. Finally, older teens are less likely to get heath check-ups than preteens. If your teen hasn't gotten the vaccine yet, talk to their doctor or nurse about getting it for them as soon as possible.

For the study, Wheeler and colleagues collected data on young women tested for cervical cancer with Pap tests from 2007 to 2014, who were part of the New Mexico HPV Pap Registry. New Mexico should be considered representative of the whole country, Wheeler said.

One expert said the findings make the case for HPV vaccination even stronger.

"These data highlight and provide even more evidence as to the efficacy of the vaccine in preventing HPV infections and related diseases," said Fred Wyand, a spokesman for the American Sexual Health Association/National Cervical Cancer Coalition.

Wyand suggests that one way to increase HPV vaccination rates is for health providers to stress the importance of the vaccine to parents.

Another way is to “normalize” the vaccine.

"Rather than treat it as something exotic, it should just be offered as part of the routine adolescent vaccine program," Wyand said.

The report was published online Sept. 29 in the journal JAMA Oncology.

Story sources: Steven Reinberg, http://www.webmd.com/sexual-conditions/hpv-genital-warts/news/20160929/hpv-vaccine-more-effective-than-thought-study#1

http://www.cdc.gov/hpv/parents/vaccine.html

 

Your Child

Heat & Your Young Athlete

2.00 to read

Football season usually means cooler weather and exciting times for high school and college age kids.

This year though, the extreme heat is not only causing great concern among parents, students and coaches- it’s been responsible for at least 3 deaths. So far this year, there have been four football-related deaths; two teenage football players from Georgia, a high school player in South Carolina, and a 55-year-old football coach in Texas.

According to a recent study excess weight, along with the high temperatures, could be a contributing factor for certain athletes.

An analysis of 58 heat-related deaths among U.S. football players from 1980 to 2009 showed that about 80% involved players who were obese by the conventional definition of a body mass index of over 30.  Ninety-five percent were overweight or obese.

The rate of heat-related illness and death among football players has increased since the mid-1990s, according to Andrew J. Grundstein, PhD, of the University of Georgia in Athens, first author of the study.

The reason for the increase is not entirely clear but could reflect the increasing body weight of players, he said.

Most of the deaths occurred in August, when fall practice typically begins, and most occurred within the first two weeks of practice. Surprisingly, a majority of the deaths occurred during morning practices.

"Mornings may be cooler, and a lot of coaches may recommend having practices in the morning because it is cooler, but high humidity levels can make the conditions very oppressive and stressful," Grundstein said during a teleconference, sponsored by the Union of Concerned Scientists.

"I think people may put their guard down because they think the risk of heat-related illness is less in the morning," he added.

Grundstein also noted that more than 60% of the deaths happened on days when practice should have been cancelled.

Your Child

Vitamin Deficiencies Linked to Kid’s Migraines

1:30

Those that have migraines say the pain is like nothing else - an intense throbbing or pulsing sensation in the head that can bring you to your knees.

The reason people get migraines is still a mystery, but a new study says scientists and doctors may want to add vitamin deficiency as a possible cause.

The study, presented at the 58th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Headache Society, suggests that doctors treating patients with migraines may want to screen for vitamin D, riboflavin (B-2) and coenzyme Q10 deficiencies.

For the study, researchers at Cincinnati Children’s looked at existing data on 7,691 young patients who were migraine sufferers and their records of blood tests for baseline levels of vitamin D, riboflavin, coenzyme Q10 and folate. Of the study participants, 15 percent were found to have riboflavin levels below the standard reference range. A significant number of patients—30 percent—had coenzyme Q10 levels at the low end of the standard reference range. Significantly lower vitamin D was seen in nearly 70 percent of the patients.

The researchers also found that patients with chronic migraines were more likely to have coenzyme Q10 deficiencies than patients who had episodic migraines. Girls and young women were more likely than boys and young men to have coenzyme Q10 deficiencies at baseline. Boys and young men were more likely to have vitamin D deficiency, but the reasons behind these trends need further investigation.

Hershey says the study adds to an ongoing observation that a significant number of people with migraines have lower levels of these vitamins. However, this trend is not seen in all patients across the board.

Scientists have looked at the link between vitamin deficiencies and migraines before, but research has been inconsistent. This study shows an association, but does not prove that vitamin deficiencies cause migraines.

In general, taking these vitamin supplements at recommended doses probably can’t hurt, but much more research is needed to determine whether vitamins alone could help stop migraines. One challenge researchers face is that vitamin supplements are often an intervention used in addition to medications and other experimental therapies. It’s therefore difficult to determine whether improvements in the condition can be explained for reasons other than supplement use.

If your child suffers from migraines, you may want to ask your doctor to screen him or her for vitamin D, Coenzyme Q10 and riboflavin levels. You can then discuss adding supplements if the results show your child is deficient in any of these vitamins.

Story source: Jessica Firger, http://www.newsweek.com/vitamin-deficiency-causes-chronic-migraines-469227

 

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