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Your Child

City Kids With Asthma Do Better Living Near a Park

2:00

The beauty of tall trees, open space and rows of lush flowers may not only offer a respite from cramped city living, but might reduce asthma symptoms in children as well, according to a new study.

An interesting, albeit small, study of urban children in Baltimore, Maryland, showed that the closer a child with asthma lived to a park or green space, the fewer symptoms they displayed compared to children with asthma that did not live near a park.

The new study included 196 inner-city children in Baltimore, aged 3 to 12 years, with persistent asthma. Some lived close to a park or other green space, while others were more than 0.6 miles away from one.

Researchers found that the farther the children lived from a park, the more asthma symptoms they experienced over a two-week period. For every 1,000 feet between their home and a park, children had symptoms one extra day.

"Living in a city environment increases the risk of childhood asthma, and factors associated with city-living -- such as air pollution -- are also known to contribute to high rates of poorly controlled asthma," study author Kelli DePriest said in a society news release.

Other studies have suggested that children with asthma benefit from exercise, and the presence of green spaces promotes physical activity and helps lower pollution, she said.

Children that were 6 years old or older benefited the most from being in the park.

DePriest said that's probably because they are freer to roam than younger kids.

DePriest suggested city planners should consider the health benefits of adding more parks to children’s environments.

In addition to policymakers and city planners, healthcare providers could also provide more information to parents and caregivers about the advantages of taking their children to parks and green spaces.

The study findings "will also help health care providers to take a more holistic view of their patients by understanding how access to green space might affect health," she concluded.

The study will be presented to a European Respiratory Society in Milan, Italy. Researched presented at meetings are typically considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Story source: Robert Preidt, https://consumer.healthday.com/respiratory-and-allergy-information-2/asthma-news-47/for-city-kids-with-asthma-nearby-green-space-is-key-726293.html

 

Your Child

Tips to Keep Your Child’s Room Allergen-Free

2:15

Symptoms such as sneezing, stuffy or runny nose, watery eyes and itchy nose, throat and eyes or roof of the mouth are common in children that suffer from respiratory allergies. If you’re looking for ways to help reduce your child’s exposure to allergens that hide within homes, one place you can start is in his or her bedroom. 

Typical allergens include: dust mites, pet dander, pollen, mold and pests.

Dust Mites- Dr. David Stukus, associate professor of pediatrics in the division of allergy and immunology at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, offers these suggestions for reducing dust mites:

·      Use zippered, dust mite-proof bed covers. These covers are made of materials with pores that are too small to let dust mites and their waste products through, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA). They should cover the mattress, box spring, and all pillows on the bed.

·      Wash bed linens at least once a week. This should be done using a hot water setting to kill and remove as many dust mites as possible, as well as the skin cells they feed on. The water should be at least 130 degrees Fahrenheit, according to the AAFA.

·      Remove or treat stuffed animals. “Ideally, stuffed animals should be removed from the bed completely,” Stukus says. An alternative solution is to keep one favorite stuffed toy on the bed and put it in the freezer for 24 hours once a week, then put it through a dryer cycle to kill and remove dust mites.

·       Remove carpets. Dust mites can thrive in carpeting. Avoid wall-to-wall carpeting and opt for hardwood floors or throw rugs instead. Just make sure to regularly wash or dry clean throw rugs, notes the American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology. Dust mites can also hide in curtains, blinds, and upholstered furniture, according to the AAFA, so you may also want to avoid having these in your child’s room.

Pet Dander – Some breed may be touted as a “hypoallergenic dog or cat,” but Stukus says there is no such thing. Any animal can bring dander into the house. To keep dander out of your child’s room, try these steps:

·      The first step is to keep pets out of your child’s bedroom. It’s not as easy as it sounds, especially when your child becomes attached to a family pet. “Any access to animals, even for limited periods of time, will increase the dander levels in the room,” Stukus says. Depending on how serious your child’s symptoms are, you may want to consider not having a pet.

·      If you decide that having a pet is ok, Stukus suggests that you bathe your pet once or twice a week. “Families usually laugh when I suggest this,” Stukus says, but it’s an effective way to reduce dander.” Some pets can handle a bath that often, but others will develop skin conditions from excess cleaning. Discuss your pet’s breed and care with a veterinarian before trying this.

·       Vacuum and dust the room at least weekly. This can help remove any dander that makes its way into the bedroom. The American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology recommends using a vacuum with a HEPA filter to reduce pet dander, as well as other allergens.

Pollen - One of the worse allergens is pollen. There’s no hiding from it but there are ways to help make the bedroom a “safe zone” when the pollen count is high.

·      Keep the windows closed. It may be tempting to open the window when the weather is cool and the idea of a little breeze to air things out sounds appealing, but even short periods of an open window can let pollen into the room.

·      Use air conditioning.  This can help filter pollen out of the air and provide a comfortable room temperature when days and evenings are warm. When winter sets in, pollen is usually not a problem.

Mold- In the early 2000s, a toxic mold panic swept the nation. Today, a lot more is understood about the various types of mold. While mold can become a problem, it’s a common substance. “Mold is everywhere in our world, but it rarely poses a problem unless you have obvious overgrowth,” Stukus says. This is often visible in the form of large stains or black spots on drywall or other surfaces.

·      If you notice mold in your child’s bedroom, treat the source of the moisture.

·      Excess mold is almost always caused by an errant source of water, such as a leak from the outside or a pipe inside the house. In some cases, you may also need to remove and replace the mold-covered surface in the room.

Pests – Many people aren’t aware of how cockroaches (and even ladybugs) can cause a respiratory illness. If insects or other pests are a problem in your child’s bedroom:

·      Keep food and drinks out of the bedroom. “Cockroaches generally congregate towards areas with water and food,” Stukus says, which is why they’re typically found in kitchens and bathrooms.

·      Fix water leaks. If cockroaches or other pests are found in your child’s bedroom despite the absence of food and beverages, then you may have water leakage that needs to be fixed. This can be a problem in certain public and rental housing, he says.

If you need to contact your landlord about fixing a problem related to your child’s allergies, it’s a good idea to include as much documentation as possible, including a letter from an allergist, Stukus says.

Can children outgrow allergies? Sometimes. Respiratory allergies such as seasonal allergic rhinitis (hay fever) can fade over time or improve.

The first step in helping your child cope with allergies is to have him or her tested for allergens to find out what triggers a reaction. Your pediatrician or allergist will then be able to prescribe medications and or provide more information on other treatments or solutions.

Story source: Quinn Phillips, https://www.everydayhealth.com/hs/managing-respiratory-allergies-children/keep-bedroom-allergy-free/

Your Child

Playtex recalls 3.6 Million Plates and Bowls

1:30

Playtex is recalling 3.6 million plates and bowls for children. The clear plastic layer over the graphics can peel or bubble from the surface of the plates and bowls, posing a choking hazard to young children.

The plates have various printed designs including cars, construction scenes, giraffes, princesses, superheroes and more.  The white polypropylene plates and bowls also have a colored rim on top and a non-slip bottom. 

Playtex is written on the bottom of the plates and bowls. The plates and bowls were sold separately and together as sets. A Mealtime set is comprised of a plate, a bowl, two utensils and a cup. 

The company has received 372 reports of the clear plastic layer over the graphics bubbling or peeling. The firm has received 11 reports of pieces of the detached clear plastic found in children’s mouths, including four reports of choking on a piece of the clear plastic layer. 

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled plates and bowls and take them away from young children. Consumers should contact Playtex for a full refund.

The plates and bowls were sold at Babies“R”Us, Target, Walmart, and other stores nationwide and online at Amazon.com from October 2009 through October 2017 for about $2.50 for a single plate or bowl and $15 for a Mealtime set.   

Consumers can contact Playtex toll-free at 888-220-2075 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. ET Monday through Friday or online at www.playtexproducts.com and click on “Recall” for more information.  

A few sample images are provided below, others can be found on https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2018/Playtex-Recalls-Childrens-Plates-and-Bowls

Your Child

“Greener” Schoolyards Improve Children’s Health

2:00

I remember my schoolyard when I was a child. It was basically the school parking lot with a few spaces marked off for softball. Kids with knee and arm scrapes visited the nurse’s station almost daily. It was icy in the winter and too hot in the late spring and early fall to play on, so many students just stood around and talked during recess. My, how times have changed.

These days, some communities are fortunate enough to have what is often referred to as “green” schoolyards and kids are much better off for it, according to a new report.

"Green schoolyards can include outdoor classrooms, native gardens, storm water capture, traditional play equipment, vegetable gardens, trails, trees and more," Dr. Stephen Pont said in an American Academy of Pediatrics news release. 

He and his colleagues found that green schoolyards provide benefits in areas such as heart health, weight control, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and stress relief.

"And outside of school time, these schoolyards can be open for the surrounding community to use, benefitting everyone," added Pont, medical director of the Texas Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Childhood Obesity. Now, that’s a great idea!

For the report, researchers from Pont’s team, collected data from prior studies related to the benefits of green schoolyards.

Other experts, such as Richard Louv, co-founder of the Minneapolis-based Children & Nature Network, believe that children need to be exposed to a more natural setting for play, exercise and a break during the school day.

"Too many children have no access to quality school grounds. In many neighborhoods, the standard play space is a barren asphalt playground or a concrete slab surrounded by chain link fence -- a completely unsuitable environment for children's play," said Louv.

Several U.S. cities have jumped on the green schoolyard band-wagon including, Austin, Texas; Grand Rapids, Mich.; San Francisco, Calif.; Providence, R.I.; and Madison, Wis.

Perhaps, other cities will take a harder look at the positive results from this report and request greener schoolyards so that more kids can enjoy and benefit from the rewards of exploring a more natural setting.

The study findings were presented recently at the American Academy of Pediatrics national meeting in Chicago. Research presented at meetings is usually considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.

Story source: Robert Preidt, https://consumer.healthday.com/kids-health-information-23/misc-kid-s-health-news-435/green-schoolyards-may-bring-better-health-to-kids-726508.html

 

Your Child

Antibiotic Resistance Rising in Kids with Urinary Tract Infections

2:00

Urinary Tract Infections (UTI) affect about 3 percent of children in the United States each year and account for more than 1 million visits to a pediatrician.

The most common cause of a UTI is the bacterium E.coli, which normally lives in the large intestine and are present in a child’s stool. The bacterium enters the urethra and travels up the urinary tract causing an infection. Typical ways for an infection to occur is when a child’s bottom isn’t properly wiped or the bladder doesn’t completely empty.

Problems with the structure or function of the urinary tract commonly contribute to UTIs in infants and young children.

UTIs are usually treated with antibiotics but a new scientific review warns that many kids are failing to respond to antibiotic treatment.

The reason, according to the researchers, is drug resistance following years of over-prescribing and misusing antibiotics.

"Antimicrobial resistance is an internationally recognized threat to health," noted study author Ashley Bryce, a doctoral fellow at the Center for Academic Primary Care at the University of Bristol in the U.K.

The threat is of particular concern among the younger patients, the authors said, especially because UTIs are the most common form of pediatric bacterial infections.

Young children are more vulnerable to complications including kidney scarring and kidney failure, so they require prompt, appropriate treatment, added Bryce and co-author Ceire Costelloe. Costelloe is a fellow in Healthcare Associated Infections and Antimicrobial Resistance at Imperial College London, also in the U.K.

"Bacterial infections resistant to antibiotics can limit the availability of effective treatment options," ultimately doubling a patient's risk of death, they noted.

The study team reviewed 58 prior investigations conducted in 26 countries that collectively looked at more than 77,000 E. coli samples.

Researchers found that in wealthier countries, such as the U.S., 53 percent of pediatric UTI cases were found to be resistant to amoxicillin, one of the most commonly prescribed primary care antibiotics. Other antibiotics such as trimethoprim and co-amoxiclav (Augmentin) were also found to be non-effective with a quarter of young patients resistant and 8 percent resistant respectively.

In poorer developing countries, resistance was even higher at 80 percent, 60 percent respectively and more than a quarter of the patients were resistant to ciprofloxacin (Cipro), and 17 percent to nitrofurantoin (Macrobid)).

The study team said they couldn’t give a definitive reason about cause and effect but said the problem in wealthier countries probably relates to primary care doctors' routine and excessive prescription of antibiotics to children.

In poorer nations, "one possible explanation is the availability of antibiotics over the counter," they said, making the medications too easy to access and abuse.

"If left unaddressed, antibiotic resistance could re-create a world in which invasive surgeries are impossible and people routinely die from simple bacterial infections," they added.

In an accompanying editorial, Grant Russell, head of the School of Primary Health Care at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, said the only surprise was the extent of the resistance and how many first-line antibiotics were likely to be ineffective.

If current trends persist, he warned, it could lead to a serious situation in which relatively cheap and easy-to-administer oral antibiotics will no longer be of practical benefit to young UTI patients. The result would be a greater reliance on much more costly intravenous medications.

The problem of antibiotic resistance for bacterial infections has been on the minds of scientist for some time now.  Cases are increasing at an unprecedented rate causing alarm and a call for more public education and due diligence on the part of physicians that prescribes antibiotics.

Story source: Alan Mozes, http://www.webmd.com/children/news/20160316/antibiotic-resistance-common-in-kids-urinary-tract-infections

 

 

Your Child

Testing Your Child for Hearing Problems

1:30

Hearing well is critical to a child’s social, emotional and cognitive development.  When hearing problems are diagnosed early, most are treatable. So it’s important to have your little one’s hearing tested, ideally by the time your baby is 3 months old.

Hearing loss is more common that you’d probably expect. It affects about 1 to 3 babies out of every 1,000.

Although many things can lead to hearing loss, about half the time, no cause is found.

Hearing loss can occur if a child:

•       Was born prematurely

•       Stayed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)

•       Had newborn jaundice with bilirubin level high enough to require a blood transfusion

•       Was given medications that can lead to hearing loss

•       Has family members with childhood hearing loss

•       Had certain complications at birth

•       Had many ear infections

•       Had infections such as meningitis or cytomegalovirus

•       Was exposed to very loud sounds or noises, even briefly

When should your child be evaluated for hearing loss? Newborns should have a hearing screening before being discharged from the hospital. Every state and territory in the U.S. has a program called Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI). The program identifies every child with permanent hearing loss before 3 months of age, and provides intervention services before 6 months of age. If your baby doesn't have this screening, or was born at home or a birthing center, it's important to have a hearing screening within the first 3 weeks of life.

If your newborn doesn't pass the initial hearing screening, it's important to get a retest within 3 months so treatment can begin right away. Treatment for hearing loss can be the most effective if it's started before a child is 6 months old.

Children who seem to have normal hearing should continue to have their hearing evaluated at regular doctor’s appointments from ages 4 to 10 years of age.

If your child seems to have trouble hearing, if speech development seems abnormal, or if your child's speech is difficult to understand, talk with your doctor.

Even if your newborn passes the hearing screening, continue to watch for signs that hearing is normal. Some hearing milestones your child should reach in the first year of life:

•       Most newborn infants startle or "jump" to sudden loud noises.

•       By 3 months, a baby usually recognizes a parent's voice.

•       By 6 months, a baby can usually turn his or her eyes or head toward a sound.

•       By 12 months, a baby can usually imitate some sounds and produce a few words, such as "Mama" or "bye-bye."

As your baby grows into a toddler, signs of a hearing loss may include:

•       Limited, poor, or no speech

•       Frequently inattentive

•       Difficulty learning

•       Seems to need higher TV volume

•       Fails to respond to conversation-level speech or answers inappropriately to speech

•       Fails to respond to his or her name or easily frustrated when there's a lot of background noise 

There are several ways your child’s hearing can be tested depending on his or her age, development and health.

During behavioral tests, an audiologist carefully watches a child respond to sounds like calibrated speech (speech that is played with a particular volume and intensity) and pure tones. A pure tone is a sound with a very specific pitch (frequency), like a note on a keyboard.

An audiologist may know an infant or toddler is responding by his or her eye movements or head turns. A preschooler may move a game piece in response to a sound, and a grade-schooler may raise a hand. Children can respond to speech with activities like identifying a picture of a word or repeating words softly.

Doctors can also examine a child for hearing loss by looking at how well his or her ear, nerves and brain are functioning.

If a hearing problem is suspected, a pediatric audiologist specializing in testing and helping kids with hearing loss can be contacted. They work closely with doctors, teachers, and speech/language pathologists.

Audiologists have a lot of specialized training. They have a Masters or Doctorate degree in audiology, have performed internships, and are certified by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (CCC-A) or are Fellows of the American Academy of Audiology (F-AAA).

Children with certain types of hearing loss have several options for treatment. They may be helped with surgery or hearing aids. The most common type of hearing loss involves outer hair cells that do not work properly. Hearing aids can make sounds louder and overcome this problem.

A cochlear implant is a surgical treatment for hearing loss; this device doesn't cure hearing loss, but is a device that gets placed into the inner ear to send sound directly to the hearing nerve. It can help children with profound hearing loss who do not benefit from hearing aids.

Making sure that your child is hearing well is one of the first steps you can take to helping him or her do well socially, academically and developmentally.

Story source: Thierry Morlet, PhD, Rupal Christine Gupta, MD,

http://kidshealth.org/en/parents/hear.html

 

Your Child

Young Girls Less Likely to See Women as “Really, Really Smart”

2:00

One of the surprise box office hits this year is “Hidden Figures.” It’s based on the true story of a team of female African-American mathematicians at NASA in the late 50s and early 60s that helped launch the first U.S. astronaut into space. The women were brilliant but faced enormous challenges for acceptance because of their race and gender.

According to a new study, you might could say that there are millions of "hidden figures" in who young girls and boys’ perceive as someone who is “really, really smart.”

Researchers wanted to try and figure out why women are underrepresented in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, fields. While most women make the decision to pursue these courses in high school or college, the scientists found that children develop a stereotype of which gender is naturally smarter early in life.

The study involved 400 children, aged 5 to 7 and included a story told by Lin Bian, a co-author and psychologist at the University of Illinois.

“There are lots of people at the place where I work, but there is one person who is really special. This person is really, really smart,” said Bian. “This person figures out how to do things quickly and comes up with answers much faster and better than anyone else. This person is really, really smart.”

She then showed them pictures of four adults—two men and two women—and asked them to guess which was the protagonist of the story. She also gave them two further tests: one in which they had to guess which adult in a pair was “really, really smart”, and another where they had to match attributes like “smart” or “nice” to pictures of unfamiliar men and women.

The results were revealing.  The 5 year-old boys and girls associated the “smart” person with their own gender. But among those aged 6 or 7, only the boys still held to that view. At an age when girls tend to outperform boys at school, and when children in general show large positive biases towards their own in-groups, the girls became less likely than boys to attribute brilliance to their own gender.

As the boys continued to believe in their own intelligence, the girls – on average – tended to see everyone on more equal terms.

Bian also found that the older girls were less interested in games that were meant for “really, really smart” children.

The stereotype that brilliance and genius are male traits is common among adults. In various surveys, men rate their intelligence more favorably than women, and in a recent study of biology undergraduates, men overrated the abilities of male students above equally talented and outspoken women.

Bian’s study suggests that the seeds of this bias are planted at a very early age. Even by the age of 6, boys and girls are already diverging in who they think is smart.

The findings could help illuminate the challenge schools face in combating gender stereotypes, even though girls often outperform boys in school. Girls drop out of high school at a lower rate than boys. Women are more likely than men to enroll in college, and they earn more college degrees each year than men.

Other games were played and social tests were given during the study with similar results. The 5 year-olds were equally interested in participating, but the 6 and 7 year-old girls were less interested in the ones that relied on “being smart.” Both genders were attracted to the games requiring persistence and hard work.

In today’s business and scientific world, more educators, policymakers and corporations are making an effort to include women in leadership roles, but breaking through the stereotypes developed at such a young age can hinder girls and women in those and other disciplines.

Children model what they see. If they are raised in an environment that diminishes young girls’ achievements but rewards young boys for the same achievements, it often sets up a life-long struggle for them to feel and accept their own self-value. 

Teachers also play an important role in encouraging all children to reach their highest achievement level.

Young girls, as well as young boys, should be recognized for their intelligence and encouraged to pursue science, technology, engineering and math studies – the rest of the world will benefit.

The research can't explain how these messages are getting to kids or how they could be changed, says Andrei Cimpian, a professor of psychology at New York University and an author of the study, He is planning a long-term study of young children that would measure environmental factors, including media exposure and parental beliefs. That would give a better idea of what factors predict the emergence of stereotypes, and what levers are available to change attitudes.

The study was published in the journal Science.

Story sources:  Ed Yong, https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2017/01/six-year-old-girls-already-have-gendered-beliefs-about-intelligence/514340/

Katherine Hobson, http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/01/26/511801423/young-girls-are-less-apt-to-think-women-are-really-really-smart

Nick Anderson, https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/grade-point/wp/2017/01/26/research-shows-young-girls-are-less-likely-to-think-of-women-as-really-really-smart/?utm_term=.fc30e9030500&wpisrc=nl_sb_smartbrief

 

Your Child

5 Fitness and Health APPS for Kids This Summer

2:00

Want to be more productive, creative, improve your gaming skills, write the next great best seller, explore new recipes or edit photos in your phone? There’s an app for that! If you can imagine it- there’s probably software designed for that very purpose.

There are numerous health apps out there, and many adults swear that they are getting and staying healthier by using them. But, what about apps dedicated to children’s health and fitness?

Here’s are five from the list of apps that have been reviewed and found a good fit for kids by commonsensemedia.org. The website provides a list of apps accompanied by reviews, appropriate age group, ease of play, violence, sex, consumerism and privacy & security ratings.

1.     Weight Loss for Kids and Teens by Kurbo Health - Age group -10 +

Weight Loss for Kids and Teens by Kurbo Health is a health app that helps kids age 8 to 18 track food choices, exercise minutes, and personal goals. The app and its related Kurbo coaching system are based on the Traffic Light Diet System developed at Stanford University. It categorizes food into green, yellow, and red choices to help kids learn to choose healthy options more often, without totally restricting any foods. There's also an exercise log, a goal-setting and weight-tracking tool, health-education games, and videos explaining each concept. Although the app is free, more personalized help is available through the Kurbo program's website, which includes live coaches. An Android version is scheduled for release soon.

2.     Zombies, Run! Age group – Age group 16-18

ZOMBIES, RUN! Runners become "Runner 5" in a post-apocalyptic community running from zombies and collecting supplies for survival. The story unfolds in episodes interspersed with the runner's own music playlist. Seasons one through three are included with the purchase, and additional episodes can be purchased in-app. Players can use the supplies they collect during their runs to build up their base and continue the fun after their runs.

3.     Stop, Breathe & Think – Age group 10 +

Stop, Breathe & Think is an app that encourages kids to learn the three skills in its title. Kids will stop and take stock of their thoughts and feelings; they'll breathe through guided meditations; and they'll think with increased kindness and compassion for the world around them. It's a great tool for developing positive habits of mind for kids and adults.

4.     LiVe – Age group 10+

LiVe is a fitness and nutrition app geared toward teens and tweens. Based on "8 Healthy Habits," the app encourages kids to set nutrition goals (such as eating a certain number of fruits and veggies and limiting sugary drinks), get more physical activity, eat meals with their families, and keep a positive attitude about food and body image. The easy, fun teen-centric graphics, solid (yet brief) information, and simple trackers give tweens and teens concrete ways to set these goals and track their progress.

5.     FitFu- Age group 13 +

FitFu is a combination of several other "Fu" fitness apps that teaches teens basic exercises, tracks their progress, and shares the information with friends. Because your device must move with your body, this app may encourage you to buy a strap or armband and is not intended for use on the iPad. There are 13 exercises included, such as lunges, pull-ups, and crunches. For each exercise, you hold or strap your device onto your body, and the accelerometer counts your reps. When finished, you can share your workouts with friends via email or Facebook or by connecting with friends who also have the app. Setting up a profile requires an email address or Facebook. You are not able to track exercises that are not included in the app. FitFu users must be 13 or older according to FitFu's terms of service.

The list above offers just a few of the apps parents can check out but there are other websites that also offer kid’s health apps and information.  Take a few moments and investigate and see what is out there; you may find some that fit your child better.

With school out and kids ready to enjoy the summer, parents can point them towards apps that can actually encourage moving, health and fitness in a fun and engaging way.

And of course, the kidsdr.com not only keeps you up on all the latest pediatric medical studies and news, but also provides in-depth discussions on kids health with pediatrician Dr. Sue Hubbard, videos, parenting q&a and safety recalls related to children’s products. You can also download the kidsdr app for quick and easy access to information - and it's free! 

Source: https://www.commonsensemedia.org/reviews/category/app/genre/health-fitness-65

http://www.kidsdr.com

 

Your Child

New Guidelines for Tonsillectomies

Most children who get repeated throat infections probably don’t need surgery to remove their tonsils and would improve in time with careful monitoring, according to new clinical guidelines on tonsillectomies in children.

The new guidelines also suggest, however, that removal of the tonsils, or tonsillectomy, may improve problems tied to poor sleep, including bed-wetting, slow growth, hyperactive behavior, and poor school performance. In fact, sleep-disordered breathing -- a set or problems that range from snoring to obstructive sleep apnea - is now the most common reason for tonsil removal in kids younger than 15. “We used to think that only if you were an air traffic controller did it matter if you slept well or not, and now we know that’s not the case,” says Amelia F. Drake, MD, chief of the division of pediatric otolaryngology at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill. More than half a million tonsillectomies are performed each year on children in the U.S., making it the second most common surgery in this age group, just behind procedures to place tubes in the ears to relieve recurrent ear infections. Despite the fact that it is a mainstay of American medicine, experts have long disagreed about how useful or appropriate tonsillectomies may be. The new guidelines, published Monday by the American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, are the first set of official recommendations on tonsillectomy published in the U.S. The guidelines aim to give doctors and parents more information about when tonsillectomy may be warranted and to help minimize the risks and pain of this procedure in young patients. “I thought they were very comprehensive,” says Drake, who reviewed the new recommendations but was not involved in drafting them. “This is an area where improvements and refinements can have a huge impact. This is medicine at its core.” New Criteria for Removing Tonsils The guidelines update a set of clinical indicators for tonsillectomies published in 2000 by the American Academy of Otolaryngology, which suggested that doctors could consider taking out the tonsils if a child had at least three cases of swollen and infected tonsils in a year. The new guideline, however, says that kids should have at least seven episodes of throat infection, such as tonsillitis or strep throat in a year, or at least five episodes each year for two years, or three episodes annually for three years, before they become candidates for surgery, and that those infections should be documented by a doctor, rather than just reported by parents. The idea, experts said, was to reserve surgery only for the most severely affected, because the surgery can rarely have serious complications including infections and serious bleeding. “Children who have fewer episodes really aren’t going to see a lot of benefit,” says Jack L. Paradise, MD, professor emeritus of pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. “There aren’t many kids, overall, who meet those stringent criteria,” Paradise says. What’s more, Paradise, and other experts stress, that even children who satisfy the guidelines shouldn’t get an automatic green light for surgery. “I’m not sure, if I had a child that met all the criteria, that I’d automatically subject the child to the consequences of that,” Paradise says, “Post-operatively, it’s a very painful procedure.” The tonsils are cone-shaped lumps of tissue embedded in the throat, and they are believed to play a role in how the body responds to infections, though experts aren’t exactly sure how. But in the early part of the 20th century, the tonsils were blamed as the “focus of infection” in the body, and doctors began taking them out as a way to promote good health. The operation became so common for example, that entire classrooms of youngsters would get their tonsils taken out at school. But by the 1970s, many experts were questioning how effective and appropriate it was to subject kids to a painful operation that could have rare but serious complications; all for what new research suggested were minimal improvements in the risk of sore throats. At the same time, however, doctors were starting to become more aware of the myriad problems tied to sleep disordered breathing in children, a spectrum of problems that can range from snoring to obstructive sleep apnea. And more tonsils began to be taken out as a way to open up the airway and improve sleep. Improvement in Care for Kids Having Surgery Several of the guidelines suggest ways doctors and parents can improve the care of children having tonsillectomies. One of the strongest recommendations is against the use of antibiotics just before or just after surgery. “They are commonly given, and there’s no evidence that antibiotics offer any benefit,” says study researcher Reginald F. Baugh, MD, professor and chief of otolaryngology at the University of Toledo Medical Center in Ohio. “You run the risk of allergic reactions and there are the harms of over-prescribing.” In drafting the statement that advises doctors to counsel parents about the importance of pain management in kids after surgery, Baugh says the panel that reviewed the evidence behind the guidelines was alarmed to learn that many parents don’t give medications to control pain after the procedure. “That was one thing we really learned, about the importance of telling parents about the need to give pain meds in these kids,” Baugh says.

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DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

If your child snores, is this a sign of something more serious?

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If your child snores, is this a sign of something more serious?

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