Twitter Facebook RSS Feed Print
Your Child

Recall: More Than 590,000 Albuterol Inhalers

1:30

Adults and children with breathing problems often rely on metered dose inhalers to open their airways, allowing them to breathe more easily. Albuterol (Proventil, Proair, Ventolin) is a medication called a bronchodilator, commonly found in rescue inhalers for acute asthma attacks.

GlaxoSmithKline is recalling more than 590,000 albuterol inhalers. Three lots of Ventolin HFA 200D inhalers have been voluntarily recalled due to a potential issue with the delivery system, a spokesman for the British pharmaceutical company said.

The affected lot numbers are 6ZP0003, 6ZP9944 and 6ZP9848. The devices have been recalled from hospitals, pharmacies, retailers and wholesalers in the United States.

The recalled inhalers may not release the correct dose of medication due to a defective delivery system. Albuterol opens airways in the lungs to treat common conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

The company said it had received an elevated number of product complaints about a bulging of the outside wrapper, indicating a leak of the propellant that delivers the medicine.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the voluntary "Level 2" recall, which only affects products in the United States, GSK spokesman Juan Carlos Molina said.

The defect does not pose a danger to patients, so they are not being asked to return inhalers they have already purchased. However, if the devices are not relieving symptoms, patients should seek medical attention right away.

GSK said it was trying to identify the root cause of the problem and would take corrective action. Patients whose inhalers are among the affected lots can contact GSK’s customer service center at 1-888-825-5249.

Story sources: Robert Jimison, http://www.cnn.com/2017/04/06/health/albuterol-inhaler-recall/

Your Child

Kids Who Specialize In One Sport Have More Injuries

Kids who came to the clinic with injuries played organized sports an average of 11 hours a week, compared with fewer than nine hours in the uninjured group. Although the researchers did not specifically look at this, Jayanthi said he has noticed that more highly specialized sports such as tennis, gymnastics and dance tend to be linked to more severe overuse injuries.Because a child’s body is still growing, children who specialize in only one sport suffer repetitive injuries more often, a new study says.

In fact, kids are twice as likely to get hurt –playing just one sport- as those who play multiple sports said Dr. Neeru Jayanthi, medical director of primary care sports medicine at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. "We saw a pretty significant difference with this intensity of training, along with specialization," said Jayanthi. The findings are slated to be presented Monday at the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine annual meeting in Salt Lake City. Research presented at medical meetings should be viewed as preliminary. "It's been accepted for the last five years or so that kids who are not super-specific do better. They're cross-trained, so they're conditioned for other movements," said Dr. Kory Gill, an assistant professor at Texas A&;M Health Science Center College of Medicine. Jayanith’s research team had done earlier studies on 519 junior tennis players and found that the kids who only played tennis were more likely to get hurt. Jayanthi wanted to see if the same findings extended to other sports. "As a physician, you get frustrated seeing kids come in with injuries that keep them out for two to three months. It's devastating," said Jayanthi, who recently saw a young gymnast with a knee injury that will keep her off the mat for at least three months. Here, the researchers looked at 154 young athletes, average age 13, who played a variety of sports. Eighty-five of the participants came to the clinic for treatment for a sports injury, while 69 were just getting sports physicals. The investigation ranked each athlete on how specialized they were, basing the score on factors like how often they trained in one sport, whether they had given up other sports to practice just one, and if they trained 8 months a year or more to compete more than 6 months a year on one sport. What they discovered was that 60.4 percent of the athletes who had been injured were specialized in one sport, compared with only 31.3 percent who came in for physicals. Kids who came to the clinic with injuries played organized sports an average of 11 hours a week, compared with fewer than nine hours in the uninjured group. Although the researchers did not specifically look at this, Jayanthi said he has noticed that more highly specialized sports such as tennis, gymnastics and dance tend to be linked to more severe overuse injuries. Why did these injuries occur? "One reason is repetitive use of the same muscle group and stressors to growing areas, for example, the spine," explained Jayanthi, who stressed that the findings were preliminary. His team, in collaboration with Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago, plans to enroll more athletes in follow-up research, and those athletes will be evaluated every six months for three years, to look more closely at how intense training can affect a young athlete's body during growth spurts. "Second is exposure risk," he added. "If you're getting really good at one sport, the intensity increases because you are getting better. People are developing adult-type sports skills in a child's body. The growing body probably doesn't tolerate this." Younger children -- those who have not entered high school -- tend to be especially vulnerable as their bodies are still growing, said Gill, who recommended that kids cross-train and condition for other movements, or just play another sport. "I tell parents to let kids be kids and play multiple sports," he said. "See what they're good at and what they enjoy." By high school, when bodies are more mature, specializing is safer, he added. When children play different sports in different seasons, they are using a wide range of motions and muscles. But when they begin playing one sport year-round, the risk of overuse injuries increases.

Your Child

Kids and Caffeine

2.00 to read

While sipping on a coffee-laced Frappuccino, I’m reading about a current study on caffeine and kids. It made me think about my own dependence on caffeine and when it started. For as long as I can remember, my parents would drink several cups of coffee in the morning before going to work, and even as late as right before they retired for the night.  I suspect my mother had a cup while I was busy being born.

I can’t remember exactly when I joined the family coffee drinking ritual, but I know I was pretty young.  Fall and winter demanded hot steaming cups of coffee and iced coffee helped cool the torturous Texas summers. Spring was a combination of both. Sometimes I think that by now, there’s probably coffee bean residue percolating in my blood stream. 

I kind of wish that I’d never started drinking coffee, because it’s the caffeine I really crave- not necessarily the taste of the brew.  When I’ve tried to quit, my body and mind rebels with headaches and bad attitudes. Which brings me back to the study on kids and caffeine.

Researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that children and teens are now getting less caffeine from soda, but more from caffeine-heavy energy drinks and coffee.

"You might expect that caffeine intake decreased, since so much of the caffeine kids drink comes from soda," said the study's lead author, Amy Branum, a statistician at the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics. "But what we saw is that these decreases in soda were offset by increases in coffee and energy drinks."

Not too long ago, energy drinks were just a fad, something that was more likely to give you the shakes than boost your energy level. That was before they were tweaked and bottled or canned in fruity flavors, sugary beverages and clever advertising. Once kids (and adults) got a taste of the “new and improved” tasty stimulates, the caffeinated beverages began to become a part of every day life – at least Monday through Friday when school and work beckoned.

"In a very short time, they have gone from basically contributing nothing to 6 percent of total caffeine intake," Branum said.

“Energy drinks have more caffeine than soda,. That's their claim to fame," she said. "That's what they're marketed for."

So, what effect does excessive caffeine intake have on our kids? Scientists are not sure yet. There are concerns and a lot of questions about the possible adverse consequences for kids who are still developing.  Caffeine addiction, obesity from sugar heavy beverages, high blood pressure, rapid heart beats and anxiety are some of the side –effects researchers are exploring. 

Using data from the 1999 to 2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, Branum's team estimated that 73 percent of American children consume some level of caffeine each day.

Although much of their caffeine still comes from soda, the proportion has decreased from 62 percent to 38 percent. At the same time, the amount of caffeine kids get from coffee rose from 10 percent in 2000 to 24 percent in 2010, the researchers found.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) states that energy drinks are never appropriate for children or adolescents and in general, caffeine-containing beverages, including soda, should be avoided. The AAP suggests that children should drink water or moderate amounts of juice instead.

The genie is probably out of the preverbal bottle as far as some adolescents and college-aged kids are concerned.  Although, if they are more aware of the possible health risks associated with excessive caffeinated beverages, they may decide to look at healthier energy producing sources such as exercise, meditation and more rest.

Where parents can have the most influence is with their younger children.  Refraining from purchasing caffeinated products (there’s even “energy” gum) and keeping them out of the home is a good first step.

And by all means, avoid introducing your kids to coffee at a young age. It might seem kind of cute, but twenty years down the road, they may wish you hadn’t slid that first cup of java their way.

The report was published in the February edition of the online journal Pediatrics.

Sources: Steven Reinberg,  http://www.webmd.com/parenting/news/20140210/energy-drinks-coffee-increasing-sources-of-caffeine-for-kids-cdc-says

www.aap.org

Your Child

Are Kid’s Sack Lunches Healthier?

2:00

For some kids who bring their lunch to school, a new study suggests that as far as nutrition goes, they’d be better off buying their meal at the school cafeteria.

Researchers found that student’s bag lunches typically contained foods that were higher in sodium and sugar with fewer vegetables and whole grains compared with standards set for school cafeterias.

The findings are not necessarily surprising, said the study's senior researcher, Karen Cullen, a professor at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.

"Parents often pack lunches based on their children's preferences," she noted. Plus, she added, some other recent studies have found a similar pattern.

The study involved 12 elementary and middle schools in one Houston-area school district. Over two months, the researchers observed more than 300 students who brought their lunch from home -- noting what they ate and what they threw away.

On average, bag lunches were low on fruits and whole grains, and especially vegetables and milk.

School guidelines say kids should have three-quarters of a cup of vegetables (which really isn’t much) with every lunch. The average elementary school bag lunch had about one-tenth of that amount, according to the study.

Lunches brought from home also contained way too much sodium. The average bag lunch averaged 1,000 to 1,110 mg, versus a limit of 640 mg in elementary school lunches.

About 90 percent of the home lunches contained a dessert, sugary drink or snack chip. Guess what? Kids ate those items whereas between 20 and 30 percent of vegetables ended up in the garbage, according to the study.

Packing milk and palatable vegetables is tricky, noted Dr. Virginia Stallings, a pediatrician at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia who specializes in nutrition.

Giving your kids money to buy it at school can help solve the milk dilemma, said Stallings, who wrote an editorial published with the study. With vegetables, though, it can be challenging to go beyond carrot sticks, she added.

"I think that's one of the advantages of the school lunch," Stallings said. "Kids can have a hot meal, with cooked vegetables." She added that schools are working on making meals that are tasty without relying on salt, and expanding to include culturally diverse choices.

I don’t really think that kid’s attitudes have changed much about school lunches in the last few decades. As long as I can remember, kids eat what they want, trade foods with others and throw out the rest. They often gripe about their lunch food whether it comes from home or the school cafeteria.. That’s just what kids do.

So, if they are going to complain anyway you might as well fix them a lunch that will help them develop strong bones and hearts. The school systems have finally started paying attention to nutrition after all these years. They’re working on creative recipes that just might temp kids to eat better.

You already know that there are way too many American children that are eating poorly, not exercising and developing diabetes at a young age. It’s important what our children eat. Sometimes a school lunch is best and sometimes a lunch brought from home is best. Many times parents split the difference and do both.

Source: Amy Norton, http://consumer.healthday.com/kids-health-information-23/education-news-745/kids-bag-lunches-not-meeting-nutrition-guidelines-694048.html

Your Child

Sweet Potatoes May Help Prevent Diarrhea in Children

1:45

Orange sweet potatoes get high approval ratings from many pediatricians and family doctors because they offer a lot of health benefits and they taste good, so kids are more likely to eat them.

Recent research suggests they may also be helpful in reducing the cases of diarrhea in some young children by more than 50 percent.

Erick Boy, head of nutrition at HarvestPlus, said that the body converts the beta-carotene in the sweet potatoes to vitamin A the same day the food is eaten. That vitamin A is then used in the outer lining of the human gut, forming a barrier against different types of bacteria. Boy further explained that the gut uses surplus vitamin A from time to time to replace worn-out cells with healthy ones.

The researchers claimed that if a child below age 5 has consumed orange sweet potatoes in the past week, then the chances were 42 percent less that child would suffer from diarrhea. In children below age 3, the likelihood of developing the condition reduced by 52 percent.

Regular consumption of orange sweet potatoes also helps decrease the duration of diarrhea, the researchers claimed. The team observed that the duration was reduced by 10 percent among 5-year-olds and 25 percent in 3-year-olds.

This could be extremely helpful in countries like Africa, where 40 percent of the children are vitamin A deficient. This increases their risk of diseases such as diarrhea, which is one of the leading causes of mortality in children, taking more than 350,000 lives of children under five in Africa every year.

Vitamin A deficiency is rare n America, however, diarrhea in U.S. children is fairly common; typically related to viral infections or tainted food sources.

Sweet potatoes are easy to prepare and can be baked as fries or tater-tots, veggie muffins, made into soup, and mashed like regular potatoes. Many kids like their orange color and sweet taste. Besides being high in vitamin A, they contain vitamin B5, B6, thiamin, niacin, and riboflavin and are high in carotenoids. They are lower in calories than white potatoes – but a little higher in sugar.

For as sweet as they are, sweet potatoes have a low glycemic index (which means they release sugar slowly into the bloodstream).

The study was published in the journal World Development.

Sources: Guneet Bhatia,  http://www.universityherald.com/articles/20051/20150615/sweet-potatoes-may-reduce-diarrhea-in-children.htm#ixzz3djHgM93e

 

 

 

Your Child

Putting Together a Family Medical History

2:00

More often than not, many of us do not think – or even know- about our generational family medical history. Do you know what your great grandmother or grandfather died from? Are there certain diseases or medical conditions that seem to run in your family?

Honestly, I only know about my own parents and siblings. I know very little about my aunts and uncles or cousin’s medical conditions. Everyone in my extended family has passed away as well as my parents and one sibling. It’s just my sister and I left.  So, most likely I won’t be able to learn much more.

Here’s what I do know about my family’s medical history in a nutshell: My mother had emphysema as well as my oldest sister. They both smoked cigarettes most of their lives. One sister had breast cancer – one had benign lumps in her breast removed and several skin cancers taken off.  My father had high cholesterol all his life and dementia when he died. My paternal grandmother died of a stroke. My maternal grandmother lived to be 96 and was seldom sick. My mother had 16 brothers and sisters. I know one aunt had heart disease. I have no idea what other conditions the rest of them may have had, so I cannot pass that infomration on to my child. 

Why is this important? Because a medical history will help you gain insight into your likelihood of developing specific conditions. It can also provide your doctors with clues they may need to reach a diagnosis for you or your child.

Putting together a reliable and complete family medical history may require some investigative work.  It’s not a topic many people like to talk about. There was a time when families did not talk about cancer, heart disease, mental illness or any illness for that matter. Superstition and ignorance kept future generations from knowing that they might be susceptible to the same conditions. Once someone begins asking questions about their family medical history, they might learn that not only did their father die of heart disease, but so did his brother, his father, his grandfather and so on. That’s important information for you and your children and their children.

It is essential to get the right information. Make a list of relatives to talk with. Include parents, siblings, children, aunts and uncles, cousins, nieces and nephews, and grandparents. Ask them about current and past medical and mental health conditions, and their ages at diagnosis.

Pay special attention to conditions that developed much earlier than typical or affected multiple family members. Include pregnancy complications such as miscarriage and stillbirth, and birth defects.

Ask about deceased family members’ cause of death, other health problems, and age at death. Ethnicity is important, because some diseases are more common in certain groups. Sickle cell anemia, for example, is more likely to occur in those of African, African-American, or Mediterranean heritage.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, for instance, notes that women with a parent, sibling, or child with breast cancer might benefit more than average-risk women from starting breast cancer screenings between 40 and 49, rather than at age 50.

When your doctor knows your family history, he or she may be able to make a quicker diagnosis or start a series of tests and treatment earlier.

There are more tools available now, than ever before, to help you build a good family medical history.  A recent Consumer Reports article list these digital resources:

•       This page from the National Society of Genetic Counselors shows you how to draw a family tree.

•       The March of Dimes' Family Health History form (PDF) considers lifestyle as well as family history.

•       The Office of the Surgeon General’s My Family Health Portrait allows you to enter, print, and update your family medical history.

Family histories can also help identify illnesses that mimic other conditions.

Because my extended family was spread all around the country, I didn’t get to know them as well as I would have liked. They moved on and began families of their own. We got the yearly Christmas card and occasionally a notification when someone died.

I never thought about putting together a medical family history, but I wish I had. It’s a good idea to gather as much medical information about present and past family members as you can, so that future generations will have that knowledge and can benefit from your generous and investigative work.

Source: Orly Avitzur, M.D., http://www.consumerreports.org/conditions-treatments/why-your-family-medical-history-matters

 

 

 

Your Child

Choosing a Summer Day Camp for Your Child

2:00

It may be too late to sign your little one up for the overnight summer camps, but there are still lots of day camps you can check out.

According to the American Camp Association, there are more than 12,000 day and resident camps in the U.S. About 7,000 of them are overnight camps and 5,000 are day camps.

Camp isn’t what it used to be when I was growing up! Today, there is tremendous variation in the types of activities offered as well as costs.

You can find specialty camps offering science, art, music, sports, technology, space, ballet and the list doesn’t stop there. If you can think of it, there’s a camp that will provide that experience. The possibilities are endless.

Costs can range from $100 to $1500, depending on the activity and length of the program.

Choosing the right camp for your child is a big decision. When it comes to choosing a day camp, where your children's friends attend is often the key deciding factor, says Laurel Barrie, co-owner of Camp Connection, a consultancy agency that helps parents pick a camp for their child.  (The service is free to parents, with chosen camps paying a set fee to the company.)  "Most people feel that their child will be happy as long as he or she is with school friends," she explains.  "Others prioritize price or hours of operation."

Some parents consider day camp a prelude to kindergarten or first grade. It’s a way to meet new kids and learn how to act in a more coordinated environment without the stress of grades, homework and structured learning.

Picking the right camp has as much to do with your own schedule and needs as it does with your child's personality, says Marla Coleman, a past president of the American Camp Association (ACA) and a founding director of Coleman Country Day Camp in Merrick, N.Y.  "If you plan on traveling, you might prefer a camp that lets your child attend for 4 or 6 weeks, as opposed to the whole summer," she says. "Working parents may need a camp that buses children, or provides after-camp care."

When possible, experts suggest you visit different camps and talk with the managers to get a feel for if it is a good match for your child.

Sometimes you can mix and match camps. One day camp that offers sports related activities and one that leans more towards the arts or sciences. You know your child’s interest better than anyone else, so search for a camp you think will meet his or her individual personality.

Many camps offer a half-day and a full day. Getting some input from other parents and camp managers may help you decide whether your child is old enough to spend a full day away from home or if a half-day is plenty

The ACA website provides a list of camps that are accredited as well as options for the type of camp, cost factor and locations.

The YMCA also provides traditional day camps in the summer that offer field trips, and a variety of daytime activities along with lunch and a couple of snack breaks.

Many churches provide day camps with religious instruction as well as playtime activities.

Before choosing a camp, talk with your child about what they would like to do during the summer, who they might like to have as a partner (if possible), and what expectations they have. It’s also a good time to address any fears they may have about being away from home or in a different environment.

Before signing your child up for camp make a list of questions you want answered first, such as:

•       How is staff hired, screened and trained?

•       What is the camper to counselor ratio?

•       What is your return rate?

•       How old are the counselors?

•       How do you handle conflicts between campers, or discipline?

•       What type of child best succeeds at this camp?

•       What is a sample daily schedule?

•       What happens if my child takes medication?

•       How do you handle separation anxiety?

•       What are your safety and medical procedures?

•       What precautions do you take to make sure the right person is picking up my child from camp?

Day camp can be a great way for kids to exercise a little independence, meet new friends and learn new skills.

This school year is rapidly coming to a close and once the novelty of being away from classes wears off, boredom often sets in. Right now may be a good time to consider a day camp for your child. But don’t wait too long though- these camps fill up fast!

Story sources:

http://www.acacamps.org

https://www.care.com/a/pick-the-right-day-camp-for-your-kid-1103251307

http://www.fatherhood.org/bid/193109/6-Tips-for-Picking-the-Right-Summer-Camp-for-Your-Child

 

Your Child

Kid’s Asthma: Test For Pollutants Inside the Home

1:45

If your child suffers from asthma, he or she should be tested to see if they are allergic to indoor pollutants such as dust mites, insects, pet dander, molds, secondhand cigarette smoke and certain household cleaning supplies says a new clinical report released by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

Controlling the triggers of asthma in the home may work as well as or reduce the need for medications wrote Elizabeth C. Matsui, MD, MHS, FAAP,  of Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore and colleagues, authors of the new guidance in the November issue of Pediatrics.

"We know that targeting all exposures that can trigger a child's asthma is more likely to be successful and to result in significant improvement than targeting only one or two of them, and can help reduce asthma attacks and the need for medication," Matsui said.

According to the report, an assessment of a child's individual environmental history should be an integral part of asthma management. The authors urged pediatricians to ask families about exposure to the following common triggers:

·      Dust mites and mold: An estimated 30-62% of children with persistent asthma are allergic to dust mites, and about half are sensitive and exposed to mold.

·      Furry pets: Cats and dogs are common furry pets found in homes, yet up to 65% of children with persistent asthma report being allergic.

·      Presence or evidence of pests such as cockroaches and rodents: Cockroach allergen exposure was first linked to asthma morbidity in children in 1997, and the link has been replicated ever since. Nearly 75-80% of U.S. homes contain detectable amounts of mouse allergen. Concentrations in homes in neighborhoods with high poverty rates are up to 1,000-fold higher than those found in suburban homes.

·      Indoor air pollution: Cigarette smoke is a major indoor trigger, with nearly 30% of all U.S. children and 40-60% of U.S. children in low-income households exposed to second-hand smoke in their homes. Additionally, the use of older wood-burning stoves, unvented space heaters, and other sources of combustion can produce nitrogen dioxide and other pollutants that are known to exacerbate asthma symptoms.

·      Household chemicals: Common household items such as air fresheners and cleaning agents include chemicals that can be respiratory irritants and trigger asthma symptoms.

The report recommended seeing an allergist to identify which allergens may be triggering your child’s asthma.

By asking specific questions, Matsui noted that pediatricians can play an important role in helping parents recognize something in the house may be making their child’s asthma worse.

"Which exposures to focus on will be informed by questions the pediatrician asks of the family," Matsui said. "Asking about pets will identify children who may have pet allergen exposure contributing to their asthma. Similarly, asking about signs of mouse or cockroach infestation will indicate which children might be at risk from these exposures."

Additionally, pediatricians should routinely ask about second-hand smoke exposure as this will guide further discussion about ways to eliminate or reduce a child's exposure to smoke, she said.

Dust mites are the most common indoor pollutant, however, you won’t see these pests crawling around your house. They are so tiny - a microscope is needed to actually see them. They feed mainly on the tiny flakes of human skin that people shed each day. These flakes work their way deep into the inner layers of furniture, carpets, bedding and even stuffed toys. These are the places where mites thrive. An average adult person may shed up to 1.5 grams of skin in a day. This is enough to feed one million dust mites!

Having dust mites doesn’t mean your house isn’t clean. Even the cleanest of houses can harbor these unwelcomed creatures. You can find out more about dust mites at http://www.aafa.org/page/dust-mite-allergy.aspx.

Indoor allergens can definitely make your child’s asthma worse and although many insurers do not currently cover environmental assessments and control measures, there are both public and private resources available to aid pediatricians, specialists, and patients with environmental remediation efforts.

Story source: Alexandria Bachert, http://www.medpagetoday.com/pediatrics/asthma/61125

Your Child

Early Treatment For Dyslexia

1.45

If your child has dyslexia, he or she is not alone.  Dyslexia is a reading disorder that happens when the brain doesn’t properly recognize and process certain symbols. Dyslexia is the most common cause of reading, spelling, and writing difficulty and about 70%-80% of all people with poor reading skills are likely to be dyslexic.

The good news is that dyslexia is treatable. Students who receive specialized education often thrive. Most dyslexics are of average or above average intelligence and just need to be taught in a different manner. In fact, many individuals that have dyslexia also show extraordinary skills in other areas to compensate for the difficulties in reading and spelling.

A new study from Italy found that the learning disability might be linked to problems with children’s visual attention. Researchers said their findings could lead to earlier diagnosis and new treatments for those with the condition.

"Visual attention deficits are surprisingly way more predictive of future reading disorders than are language abilities at the pre-reading stage," Andrea Facoetti, of the University of Padua, said in a journal news release.

Researchers followed children in Italy for three years beginning when they were in kindergarten and just starting to learn to read. They continued their study till the children were in second grade. The scientists analyzed the children’s visual spatial attention, or their ability to distinguish between what is relevant and what is irrelevant, by asking them to identify certain symbols while they were being distracted. The children were also given tests on syllable identification, verbal short-term memory and rapid color naming.

The study found that children who had problems with visual attention also had trouble reading, the researchers said.

"This is a radical change to the theoretical framework explaining dyslexia," Facoetti said. "It forces us to rewrite what is known about the disorder and to change rehabilitation treatments in order to reduce its impact."

The study's authors stated that simple visual-attention tasks would help identify children at risk for dyslexia early on. "Because recent studies show that specific pre-reading programs can improve reading abilities, children at risk for dyslexia could be treated with preventive remediation programs of visual spatial attention before they learn to read," the researchers said in the news release.

The study was published online in the journal Current Biology.

Children with dyslexia who are not diagnosed early may grow frustrated and show signs of depression and low self –esteem. MedicineNet.com has an excellent review of dyslexia with causes, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment options.

Sources: http://news.yahoo.com/study-suggests-treating-dyslexia-kids-learn-read-160311968.html

http://www.medicinenet.com/dyslexia/article.htm

Pages

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

New study reveals how much sleep kids really need.

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.