Your Baby

Baby's First Tooth!

Many dentists like to see a child by age one, not because there are a lot of problems to detect, but because it’s a good time to help parents learn more about dental health care and to establish a good relationship with the child.After all the crying, and teething fits, midnight trips to the crib, and endless time soothing and rubbing gums.... it’s finally here. Baby’s first tooth!  It’s also time to start thinking about your child’s dental health, and baby’s first visit to the Dentist.

It is generally recommended that an infant sees a dentist by the age of 1 or within 6 months after his or her first tooth comes in.

Many dentists like to see a child by age one, not because there are a lot of problems to detect, but because it’s a good time to help parents learn more about dental health care and to establish a good relationship with the child. The average age for continuing visits is about 2 to 2.5 years old depending on your child’s dental heredity and overall health. Many dentists like to see children every 6 months to build up the child's comfort and confidence level in visiting the dentist, to monitor the development of the teeth, and promptly treat any developing problems. What Happens at the First Dental Visit? The first dental visit is usually short and involves very little treatment. This visit gives your child an opportunity to meet the dentist in a non-threatening and friendly way. Some dentists may ask the parent to sit in the dental chair and hold their child during the examination. The parent may also be asked to wait in the reception area during part of the visit so that a relationship can be built between your child and your dentist. During the exam, your dentist should check all of your child's existing teeth for decay, examine your child's bite, and look for any potential problems with the gums, jaw, and oral tissues. If indicated, the dentist or hygienist will clean any teeth and assess the need for fluoride. He or she will also educate parents about oral health basics for children and discuss dental developmental issues and answer any questions. Topics your dentist may discuss with you might include: 1. Good oral hygiene practices for your child's teeth and gums and cavity prevention 2. Fluoride needs 3. Oral habits such as thumb sucking, tongue thrusting, lip sucking. 4.  Developmental milestones 5. Teething 6. Proper nutrition You will be asked to complete medical and health information forms concerning the child during the first visit. Come prepared with the necessary information. What's the Difference Between a Pediatric Dentist and a Regular Dentist? A pediatric dentist has at least two additional years of training beyond dental school. The additional training focuses on management and treatment of a child's developing teeth, child behavior, physical growth and development, and the special needs of children's dentistry. Although either type of dentist is capable of addressing your child's oral health care needs, a pediatric dentist, his or her staff, and even the office décor are all geared to care for children and to put them at ease. If your child has special needs, care from a pediatric dentist should be considered. Ask your dentist or your child's doctor what he or she recommends for your child. When Should Children Get Their First Dental X-Ray? There are no hard-and-fast rules for when to start dental X-rays. Some children who may be at higher risk for dental problems. Children prone to baby bottle tooth decay or those with cleft lip or palate should have X-rays taken earlier than others. Usually, most children will have had X-rays taken by the age of 5 or 6. As children begin to get their adult teeth around the age of 6, X-rays play an important role in helping your dentist. X-rays allow your dentist to see if all of the adult teeth are growing in the jaw, to look for bite problems and to determine if teeth are clean and healthy. Once a child’s diet includes anything besides breast-milk or baby formula, erupted teeth are at risk for decay. The earlier the dental visit, the better the chance of preventing dental problems. Children with healthy teeth chew food easily and smile with confidence. Start your child now on a lifetime of good dental habits.

Your Baby

C-sections Tied to Higher Asthma Risk for Babies

Babies born via Caesarean section are more likely to develop asthma than children who were delivered naturally.Babies born via Caesarean section are more likely to develop asthma than children who were delivered naturally according to Swiss researchers. The findings are based on nearly 3,000 children whose respiratory health was monitored until age eight. By that time about 12 percent of the children were diagnosed with asthma.

The findings, published in the medical journal Thorax, underscore the potential risks of elective C-sections.

"In this situation the mother should be informed of the risk of asthma for her child, especially when the parents have a history of allergy or asthma," said Caroline Roduit of Kinderspital Zurich Medical Institution. Babies born via C-section are not exposed to their mother's bacteria when they pass through the birth canal, something that helps prime the immune system and could explain the increased risk, researchers said.

Your Baby

Spit-Cleaning Your Infant’s Binky

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Have you ever sucked on your baby’s pacifier to clean it? Many parents have. Babies drop their binkies all the time and if you’re in a hurry or just figure a little spit-cleaning won’t hurt, you’re more likely to stick it in your own mouth and give it a quick once over.

A new study out of Sweden says the spit-cleaning technique may actually help your infant avoid eczema and asthma.

“It was surprising that the effect was so strong,” says pediatric allergist Dr. Bill Hesselmar of Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital in Gothenburg, Sweden, lead author of the study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics.

The study involved 136 infants who used a pacifier in their first 6 months. 65 of the infants had parents that reported sucking the pacifier to clean it. In those children, both eczema and asthma were strongly reduced when they were examined at 18 months of age. At 36 months of age, the protective effect remained for eczema but not for asthma.

Scientists didn’t know why the sucking on the baby’s pacifier acted as a protector or whether it was filtering out germs. The technique didn’t have any impact on respiratory illness, meaning that the babies were not more likely to get a cold or the flu from their parents. Common sense would dictate that if you have a cold or the flu or any other contagious condition, then it’s not a good idea to suck on your baby’s binky. Otherwise, maybe it’s not such a bad idea.

Why is sucking on your infant’s pacifier possibly helpful in preventing asthma or eczema in your child? Scientists hypothesize that tiny organisms in the saliva of the parents may be why. Parent’s saliva introduces gut micoflora that live in the digestive tract of the baby. “We know that if infants have diverse microflora in the gut, then children will have less allergy and less eczema,” says Hesselmar. “When parents suck on the pacifier, they are transferring microflora to the child.”

Many pediatricians and family doctors are concerned that children are being “excessively cleaned” into illness. With anti-bacterial soaps and swipes being used on everything, and kids not allowed to get dirty, their immune system isn’t getting the workout it needs to help fight off common illnesses. The bacterial microorganisms provided in the parent’s saliva might help stimulate the baby’s immune system.

“The most exciting result was the eczema,” says Christine Johnson, chair of the public health department at Detroit’s Henry Ford Hospital. “I’m a bit more skeptical about the asthma findings because asthma is hard to measure before a child is five or six years old.”

Hesselmar also urges moms to lick the baby’s pacifier if their child was delivered by C-section. Vaginal delivered babies receive quite a bit of microbes during delivery. C-section babies can be more prone to allergies. “If they are using a pacifier and those parents think it’s OK to suck on the pacifier, then yes, I would recommend it,” Hesselmar says.

Some parents may find the idea of picking up a pacifier that’s fallen on the floor and putting it in their mouth kind of disgusting. That’s fine, there’s no need to worry about it. If the idea doesn’t bother you, all the better says Hesselmar, “I haven’t heard of anyone getting ill from it,” he says. “There isn’t much bacteria on the floor.”

Source: Barbara Mantel,

Your Baby

Second Infant Death Prompts Recall Re-announcement of Delta Cribs

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In January of 2011, CPSC learned of a death in which a 7-month old girl became entrapped and suffocated between the detached drop-side and mattress of her recalled crib. The crib was purchased secondhand and re-assembled without safety pegs in the bottom tracks.A second infant death has prompted the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission to issue a second recall announcement for Delta Enterprise “Safety Peg” Drop-Side cribs.

In 2008 the CPSC issued a recall for 985,000 drop-side cribs saying that some cribs were missing safety pegs, causing possible entrapment and suffocation. In January of 2011, CPSC learned of a death in which a 7-month old girl became entrapped and suffocated between the detached drop-side and mattress of her recalled crib. The crib was purchased secondhand and re-assembled without safety pegs in the bottom tracks. Missing safety pegs can create a situation where the crib's drop-side rail disengages from the track. This can create a hazardous space in which an infant can become entrapped and suffocate. In 2008, at the time of the original recall, CPSC notified consumers about the death of an 8 month-old girl who became entrapped and suffocated when the drop-side of the crib detached. At that time, there were 9 detachments, and 2 entrapments reported. The crib used was, once again, re-assembled without the safety pegs. "Buying or accepting cribs second hand can be risky," said CPSC Chairman Inez Tenenbaum. "Second hand cribs may not come with all of the necessary parts that are needed to make sure your baby is safe. We urge parents and caregivers to use caution and to be aware that new rules established by CPSC will bring safer cribs to the market this summer." The recalled cribs were sold at popular retail stores such as Kmart, Target and Walmart between January 1995 and December 2005 (through September 2007 for model 4624) for about $100. You can check for Delta’s brand name, address, and Model number on the mattress support boards, The Delta logo is on the crib’s top “teether” rail. This announcement includes the following 49 crib models with "Crib Trigger Lock with Safety Peg" drop-side hardware: •       4320, 4340; •       4500, 4520, 4530, 4532, 4540, 4542, 4550, 4551, 4580; •       4600, 4620, 4624 - production dates 01/06 thru 11/07, 4640, 4660, 4720, 4735, 4742, 4750 - production dates 01/95 thru 12/00; •       4760, 4770, 4780, 4790; •       4820, 4840, 4850, 4860, 4880, 4890, 4892; and •       4900, 4910, 4920, 4925-2, 4925-6, 4930, 4940, 4943, 4944, 4947, 4948, 4949, 4950, 4958, 4963, 4968, 4969, 4980. CPSC urges parents and caregivers to immediately stop using cribs that are missing a safety peg on either leg of the drop side and contact Delta to receive a free, easy-to-install repair kit. Call Delta toll-free at (800) 816-5304 anytime or visit the firm's website at to order the free repair kit. Parents and caregivers are encouraged to find a safe, alternative sleep environment for their child until the repair kit, with new safety pegs, is safely installed on the recalled cribs. Baby cribs are often handed down from a family member or friend, or picked up at garage sales and second-hand stores. It’s important that caregivers make sure that their crib has the safety pegs in place. CPSC reminds parents not to use any crib with missing, broken or loose parts. Make sure to tighten hardware from time to time to keep the crib sturdy. When using a drop-side crib, parents should check to make sure the drop side or any other moving part operates smoothly. Always check all sides and corners of the crib for parts separating that can create a gap and entrap a child. In addition, do not try to repair any side of the crib. Babies have died in cribs where repairs were attempted by caregivers. Crib age is a factor in safety. At a minimum, CPSC staff recommends that you do not use a crib that is older than 10 years old. New, mandatory federal crib rules take effect on June 28, 2011. All cribs manufactured and sold after that date must meet new and improved safety requirements. Older cribs do not meet the new standard and can have a variety of safety problems. Check if your crib has been recalled at

Your Baby

Recall: 2-in-1 Dream On Me Bassinet to Cradle


Dream on Me is recalling about 13,000 of their 2-in-1 Bassinet to Cradle products due to fall and suffocation hazards.

The wire supports on the sides of the bassinet can disconnect causing the fabric sides to lower; posing a risk that infants can fall out or become entrapped and suffocate.

This recall involves the 2-in-1 Bassinet to Cradle, sold in pink, blue, green, and white. The bassinet has metal frame supports and fabric sides with a removable half-canopy on the top.  The frame can also be adjusted with two rocking legs on each end of the bassinet.

It is designed with fabric handles and the option to remove the bassinet from the frame to use the bassinet portion as a “by the bed” sleeper product.

The recalled model numbers are:

·      439-A

·      439-B

·      439-G

·      439-P

·      439-W

The model numbers can be found on a tag that is located under the mattress pad of the bassinet. This tag is a removable tag you see in the store but is removed prior to use.

Dream on Me has received one incident of the wire frame support bracket failing and the fabric portion of the bassinet collapsing while an infant was asleep in the cradle.  No injuries have been reported.  

Consumers should immediately stop using the product and contact Dream On Me to obtain a free repair. In the meantime, parents are urged to find an alternate, safe sleeping environment for the child, such as a crib that meets current safety standards or play yard depending on the child’s age.

The recalled products were sold online at,,, and from May 2012 to October 2014 for about $60.

Consumer can contact Dream on Me toll-free at (877) 201-4317, from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET Monday through Friday, or online at and click on the “Recalls” icon on the home page for more information.


Your Baby

Pets May Protect Infants Against Allergies

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Fluffy or Fido may protect your baby from developing allergies later in life. Many owners will tell you that their pet is like a family member. A new study suggests that those four-legged family members may reduce a child’s risk of developing allergies.

For years allergists have warned parents that some pets may actually cause allergies, but a new study published in the journal Clinical & Experimental Allergy suggests that early exposure to pets, during an infant’s first year of life, appears to provide an actual defense against allergies later in life. Lead study author Ganesa Wegienka, Ph.D., of Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit noted, “Exposing children to cats and dogs in the home is not going to increase the risk of sensitization to these animals. It might even decrease the risk.” Interesting revelations were found in the study such as; 18 year old males, who lived with a dog in the house when they were an infant, reduced their risks of developing allergies by half,  but not so with girls. Cats, on the other hand, seem to affect both sexes. Infant boys and girls who lived in a home with cats reduced their risks of developing allergies –by about 48%- by the age of 18 years. Another finding of the analysis showed that both males and females delivered by C-section had a 67 percent less likelihood of developing a dog allergy when a dog was present in the home during their first year of life. Wegienka said that this could be due to the fact that babies born by cesarean section are not exposed to the diverse microflora that babies born vaginally are. The long held idea that pets may cause allergies led Wegienka, and her colleagues, to study what effects childhood exposure to cats and dogs had on the risk of developing allergies to them. For their study, the researchers analyzed blood samples of more than 500 children taken during the Detroit Childhood Allergy Study from 1987 to 1989 that followed participants from birth. The focus of the analysis was to look for the presence of an antibody known as animal-specific IgE, which would indicate that a child was sensitized to that animal. In addition, follow-up among children in the study at age 18 included additional blood samples and pet histories. The histories indicated that 184 participants had a dog, and 110 of the children had a cat, during their first year of life. Pet allergy is an allergic reaction to proteins found in an animal's skin cells, saliva or urine. Signs of pet allergy include those common to hay fever, such as sneezing and runny nose. Some people may also experience signs of asthma, such as wheezing and difficulty breathing. Severe allergic reactions can be deadly. Pet allergy is often triggered by exposure to the dead flakes, or dander, that a pet sheds. Any animal with fur can be a source of pet allergy, but the most common pets are cats, dogs, rodents and horses. Wegienka pointed out that the study does not definitively indicate that having a family pet will prevent infants from developing allergies later in life, as it only found an association between a reduced risk for allergies and exposure to cats and dogs at an early age. Wegienka cautioned, “We don't want to say that everyone should go out and get a dog or cat to prevent allergies.” She then added, “More research is needed, though we think this is a worthwhile avenue to pursue. How does having a dog or a cat change the home environment? And, how does that affect allergy risk?" If you have an infant and a pet sharing the house, it’s a good idea to keep an eye on your little one to make sure that he or she is able to tolerate pet dander.

Your Baby

Magnesium Useful for Newborns with Low Oxygen

Early treatment with magnesium can reduce the nerve damage seen in infants born with low oxygen levels.Early treatment with magnesium can reduce the nerve damage seen in infants born with low oxygen levels, also referred to as asphyxia, according to a trial done by researchers in India. The results of the trial are published in the journal Pediatrics. Perinatal asphyxia happens when a newborn is deprived of oxygen long enough to cause apparent damage. Most commonly it is caused by a fall in the mother's blood pressure or interference during delivery with blood flow to the infant's brain.

On average, between two and 10 infants per 1,000 born at full-term will have perinatal asphyxia. Asphyxia causes high levels of the amino acid glutamate to build up in the newborn brain said researcher Dr. Mushtaq Ahmad Bhat. For up to 72 hours, the excess glutamate causes irreversible nerve injury by opening certain cell channels and allowing calcium to flow into cells. Magnesium works to block this calcium flow. Researchers at the Sheri-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences in Srinagar looked at 40 term infants admitted to their neonatal intensive care unit with severe perinatal asphyxia and moderate or severe brain injury. They were randomly assigned to receive three magnesium treatments or inactive placebo. Both groups received their assigned treatment within six hours of birth, then again after 24 and 48 hours. All patients received normal supportive care for perinatal asphyxia. Two patients in each group died during hospitalization. 56 percent of patients given placebo had abnormal neurologic exams when discharged from the hospital compared with just 22 percent of those given magnesium. The study is the first one with a placebo comparison group to show "improved neurologic outcomes at discharge in the," the authors note. They conclude that large, multicenter trials are now needed to corroborate their findings.

Your Baby

Warning on Baby Acetaminophen

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The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is renewing a warning about the potential for dosing errors with liquid  products for infants. A new recommended strength may be one cause for the updated warning.

A new strength, 160 mg/5 ml, was introduced to actually help parents and caregivers give the correct dosage, but the change was voluntary for manufacturers. The goal was to have a single concentration of liquid acetaminophen available. Dosing errors were reported in several reviews and were attributed, in some circumstances, to the variety of strengths available.

The FDA announced that not all manufacturers have switched to the new strength and bottles with 80mg/mL plus 80mg/0.8mL are still on store counters. The old version and the new version also have similar packaging – adding to the confusion.

In a safety announcement issued late Thursday, the FDA posted pictures of new and old boxes of Little Fevers brand of infant acetaminophen. "Both boxes in this example say 'New' on the front, but only one of them contains the new concentration of liquid acetaminophen," the FDA said.

One difference you can use to tell the difference is that the older version comes with a dropper, and the newer version comes with a syringe intended to make dosing more precise.

The FDA stressed, again, parents need to use the dosing devise to make sure they are giving the correct amount of acetaminophen to their infant.

Patients and caregivers should contact their healthcare professional if they find the measuring device confusing or are unsure how to measure a dose for a child using the device provided," the agency said. Moreover, healthcare professionals should instruct adults in proper dosing of liquid acetaminophen products for infants when they recommend the drug.

The FDA website lists these suggestions for parents or caregivers that give their child acetaminophen.

“Be very careful when you’re giving your infant acetaminophen” says Carol Holquist, director of FDA’s Division of Medical Error Prevention and Analysis.

Here’s what the agency wants parents and caregivers to do:

  • Read the Drug Facts label on the package very carefully to identify the concentration of the liquid acetaminophen, the correct dosage, and the directions for use.
  • Do not depend on a banner proclaiming that the product is “new.” Some medicines with the old concentration also have this headline on their packaging.
  • Use only the dosing device provided with the purchased product in order to correctly measure the right amount of liquid acetaminophen.
  •  Consult your pediatrician before giving this medication and make sure you’re both talking about the same concentration.

If your pediatrician prescribes a 5 mL dose of the less concentrated liquid acetaminophen, but you administer a 5 mL dose of the more concentrated liquid acetaminophen, the child can receive a potentially fatal overdose during the course of therapy,

Conversely, if a physician prescribes a dose based on the more concentrated liquid acetaminophen and the less concentrated medication is used, the child might not receive enough medication to fight a fever, she say.  

Acetaminophen is marketed for infants under brand names such as Little Fevers Infant Fever/Pain Reliever, Pedia Care Fever Reducer Pain Reliever and Triaminic Infants’ Syrup Fever Reducer Pain Reliever. There are also store brands on the shelves.

 The ingredients indicators do look similar as you can see below.

acetaminophen doses









Source :

Your Baby

Similac Baby Formula Recall

Abbott Laboratories, manufacturers of Similac baby formula recalls up to 5 million powdered products for insect contamination. The makers of Similac baby formula, is voluntarily recalling several products due to insect contamination.

Abbott Laboratories is recalling their powdered baby formula sue to the possibility of small insect parts and beetle larvae. The beetles were found in the production area of one of Abbott’s manufacturing facilities that makes Similac. There is currently no reported immediate healthy risk to infants drinking Similac baby formula.  Parents should look for any gastrointestinal symptoms such as refusal to eat or stomach aches as possible symptoms of ingesting the recalled formula. The Similac recall includes the following products:

  • -all lots of Similac formula powder product lines offered in plastic containers, including 1.38-lb, 1.45-lb and 2.12-lb containers
  • -Similac Sensitive Isomil Soy - 12.4-oz cans - only lots numbers containing RB
  • -Similac Advance - 12.4-oz cans - only lots numbers containing RB
  • -certain lots of Similac formula powder product lines offered in sizes such as 8-ounce, 12.4-ounce and 12.9-ounce cans
  • -Similac formula powder in 8-ounce sample cans that could have been given out in doctor's offices and hospitals

The Similac recall does not affect the ready-to-feed or concentrated baby formula or specialty Similac formulas. Check out the recalled brands at for all brands and lot numbers or you may call Abbott’s consumer hotline 800-986-8850.


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