Your Baby

Small Birth Size Linked to Sleep Problems Later

Children who were born at a relatively small size may be more likely than their peers to have sleep difficulties, a new study suggests. The study, which appears in the journal Sleep, included 289 8-year-olds born healthy and full-term. It found that the lower the children's weight and length at birth, the greater their odds of having poor sleep or sleep disturbances such as sleep-related breathing problems or nightmares.

What's more, mothers' prenatal drinking -- a habit that can impair fetal growth and development -- was linked to a greater risk of childhood sleep problems. The researchers report it is possible that in some children, smaller birth size is a marker of alterations in nervous system development, which might affect the body's sleep regulation later in life. "We showed that even within children born healthy and at-term gestation, smaller body size at birth increases the risk for poor sleep," said lead researcher Dr. Anu-Katriina Pesonen, of the University of Helsinki in Finland. That does not mean, however, that every child born at a relatively small size is destined for sleep difficulties. For one, birth size is partially determined by genetics, and Pesonen said it's possible that the current findings do not pertain to newborns who are simply naturally on the smaller size. On the other hand, she said, factors that can impair normal fetal growth -- which, besides prenatal drinking, include prenatal smoking and high chronic stress levels -- may help set the stage for sleep problems later on. For their study, Pesonen and her colleagues had each child wear an actigraph -- a watch-like device that measures sleep and activity patterns -- for one week. Their parents also completed a standard questionnaire on childhood sleep disturbances. In general, the researchers found, the smaller a child was at birth, the greater the likelihood of sleep disturbances or low sleep efficiency. Sleep efficiency refers to a person's ability to fall asleep and stay asleep once the head hits the pillow. In this study, 26 children had low sleep efficiency -- spending roughly three-quarters or less of their time in bed actually asleep. The researchers also found an association between sleep problems and mothers' prenatal drinking, even at relatively moderate levels. Among children whose mothers had consumed more than one drink per week during pregnancy, the risks of short sleep duration -- less than 7.5 hours per night -- and low sleep efficiency were about three times higher compared with other children. Prenatal smoking was not linked to sleep problems. However, Pesonen's team notes, this could be because few mothers in the study said they had smoked during pregnancy, limiting the study's ability to find an association. For now, the researchers conclude, the findings suggest that even moderate levels of drinking during pregnancy, and birth size variations within the normal range, may affect children's sleep later on.

Your Baby

Mother’s Migraines linked to Colic in Babies

1.45 to read

No one knows for sure why babies get colic. Colicky babies cry non-stop and don’t respond to being comforted. It can push a new parent over the edge and even the most experienced parent, who has to watch their baby cry in pain, can be moved to tears themselves.

A new study from the University of California, San Francisco suggests that mothers who suffer migraine headaches are more than twice as likely to have babies with colic than mothers without a history of migraines.

The study raises the question - are the two linked? It’s an important question because excessive crying is one of the most common triggers for shaken baby syndrome, which can cause death, brain damage and severe disability, the researchers said.

"If we can understand what is making the babies cry, we may be able to protect them from this very dangerous outcome," said Amy Gelfand, MD, a child neurologist with the Headache Center at UCSF who will present the findings in April at the American Academy of Neurology's 64th annual meeting.

Colic in healthy babies has long been associated with gastrointestinal problems. But, after 50 years of studies no defining link has been established. Babies who are fed solely breast milk are as likely to have colic as those fed formula, and giving colicky babies medication for gas does not help.

In the UCSF study, Gelfand and her colleagues surveyed 154 new mothers bringing their infants to the pediatrician for routine checkups at two months, the age when colicky crying typically peaks. The mothers were surveyed about their babies' crying patterns and their own history of migraine, and those responses were analyzed to make sure the reported crying fit the clinical definition of colic.

Mothers who suffered migraines were found to be 2 1/2 times as likely to have colicky babies. Overall, 29% of infants whose mothers had migraines had colic compared to 11% of babies whose mothers did not have migraines.

The researchers believe that colic may be an early manifestation of symptoms known as childhood periodic syndrome. These symptoms could be a precursor to migraine headaches later in life. Babies with colic may be more sensitive to a stimulated environment; much like migraine sufferers are affected by light and loud sounds.

The UCSF researchers’ plan to study a group of colicky babies over the course of their childhood to see if they develop other childhood periodic syndromes, such as abdominal migraine.

If you believe your baby has colic, check with your pediatrician. There are comfort strategies that have helped some babies respond positively.

Source: http://news.nurse.com/article/20120220/NATIONAL02/102270023

Your Baby

How Much Water Does Your Baby Need?

2.00 to read

Since most of the country is sweltering with summer heat and temperatures well into the upper 90’s and even over 100 degrees, I guess I can understand parents’ concerns about giving their babies water. It seemed like a strange question to me when I first started hearing, “Dr. Sue, how much water does my baby need to drink every day?”  I know I am continuing to talk about staying hydrated during the heat wave, but we are really talking about those children and adults who are spending time outdoors, especially when involved in physical activity.

I have actually been telling parents with newborns that there is really no reason to take that sweet new baby outside for any length of time. I think it is too hot to enjoy being outside, and an infant doesn’t miss going to the playground like a 2 or 3 year old would.

But, when you have young children you have to get out (or go crazy inside everyday), so everyone just suffers through the heat. Remember to take your sunscreen and fluids and head out for an hour or two, in the morning or later afternoon if at all possible. These children need lots of water breaks, as do their parents and caregivers.

So, back to the water and baby question. Infants in the first 6 months are getting fed breast milk or formula which is made up of free water, so therefore a baby is staying hydrated by eating every  2 -3 hours. A baby doesn’t “need” water every day for any particular reason.

With that being said, it does not mean that your baby cannot have a bottle of water. This is especially true for a breast fed infant whose mother may have run out for an hour but is coming back to breast feed.  But what if the baby awakens or gets hungry 30 min or so prior to mother getting home.  This might be a good time to “stall” by giving the baby a bottle of water, rather than formula. In this case it is fine to use tap water (yes bottled water is not necessary, unless you have a well or something) in a bottle and see if the baby will even take it. Most babies don’t just gulp down 8 ounces of water!

If you are out in the heat with an infant, just remember to feed them every 2 – 3 hours and make sure they have nice drool in their mouths and wet diapers. If you are concerned about hydration take along a bottle of water for both you and your baby. You will probably need it more than your baby!

That’s your daily dose for today.  We’ll chat again tomorrow.

 

 

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Your Baby

Rise in Infant Suffocations Tied to Bed-Sharing

Rates in the United States of sudden infant death from suffocation or strangulation have quadrupled in the past 20 years.

Rates in the United States of sudden infant death from suffocation or strangulation have quadrupled in the past 20 years, most apparently from parents sleeping with their babies, a new government study found. The trend is clear, despite successful campaigns to prevent SIDS by putting babies to sleep on their backs, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported in Pediatrics. Black male babies are the most affected, but it is not clear why. "Infant mortality rates attributable to accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed have quadrupled since 1984," the CDC's Carrie Shapiro-Mendoza and colleagues wrote. "Prevention efforts should target those at highest risk and focus on helping parents and caregivers provide safer sleeping environments." Researchers looked at data from 1984 to 2004. It showed that sudden, unexpected infant deaths fell over the 20-year period. Rates of strangulation or suffocation, however, rose by 14 percent between 1996 and 2004. Evidence shows that babies should be laid to sleep alone, on a flat mattress, with no loose pillows or blankets and in a crib with bars designed to prevent entrapment.

Your Baby

Infant Medicine Recall

1.45 to read

“Out of an abundance of caution”, Perrigo Co. has issued a voluntary recall of 18 batches of their over-the-counter liquid acetaminophen that is used to treat fever and aches and pains in infants.

The recall is not because of a problem with the medicine itself, but because a small number of boxes may contain a dispensing syringe without dose markings.

The medicine is sold under a variety of brand names including Babies R Us and Care One.  The list of labels and batch numbers of the recalled product are listed below.

Label and Batches

BABIES R US- 3KK0606

CARE ONE -3HK0564

EQUALINE - 3HK0672

EQUATE - 3HK0672, 3JK0433, 3JK0594, 3JK0595, 3JK0653, 3JK0673, 3KK0815,

3KK0817

HARMON FACE VALUES - 3JK0594

HEALTH MART - 3HK0671

HEALTHY ACCENTS - 3HK0671, 3KK0606

HEB - 3KK0606

KROGER - 3GK0645, 3GK0704, 3HK0671, 3JK0433, 3JK0595, 3JK0653, 3JK0433,

3JK0595, 3GK0645, 3GK0704, 3JK0595

LEADER DRUG - 3JK0433, 3JK0594

MEIJER - 3JK0594, 3JK0597

PUBLIX - 3JK0595

RITE AID - 3GK0704

TOPCARE - 3KK0359, 3KK0494

UP & UP - 3HK0672

WALGREEN - 3GK0704, 3HK0564, 3HK0671, 3JK0433, 3JK0595, 3JK0610, 3KK0360

Giving infants the correct dose of acetaminophen is very important when treating them for an illness or injury. Too much acetaminophen can overload the liver’s ability to process the drug safely and can lead to a life-threatening condition.

According to Perrigo’s press release about the recall, if you have purchased a package that contains an oral dosing device that does not have dose markings, the consumer should not use the product and should call Perrigo's Consumer Affairs Department, toll free, 1-800-719-9260. Consumers should contact their physician or healthcare provider if they have any questions, or if they or their children experience any problem that could possibly be related to this drug product.

No injuries have been reported to Perrigo at this time.

Source: http://perrigo.investorroom.com/2013-11-01-Perrigo-Initiates-Nationwide-Voluntary-Product-Recall-Of-Acetaminophen-Infant-Suspension-Liquid-160-mg-5-mL-Due-To-A-Potential-Defect-With-The-Co-Packaged-Oral-Syringe

Michael Calia, http://online.wsj.com/article/BT-CO-20131101-711768.html?dsk=y&mod=dist_smartbrief

Unmarked syringe

Your Baby

Recall: Dream On Me Bath Seats

2:00 to read

Dream On Me Bath Seats are being recalled by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) due to the product’s failure to meet federal safety standards and one near drowning of a 12-month-old baby girl. Consumers, who own this product, should stop using it immediately.

Name of Product: Dream On Me Bath Seats

Units: About 50,000

Importer: Dream On Me Inc., of South Plainfield, N.J.

Hazard: The bath seats fail to meet federal safety standards, including the requirements for stability. Specifically, the bath seats can tip over, posing a risk of drowning to babies.

Incidents/Injuries: CPSC and Dream On Me have received five reports involving these bath seats, including a report of a near drowning involving a 12-month-old baby girl. The baby did not require medical treatment.

Description: The recall includes all Dream On Me bath seats. Some of the seats have a Dream On Me label under or on the rear of the bath seats. Model numbers are also printed underneath the bath seats and on the product packaging and include the following product models and colors:

Model Name | Model Number | Color

Baby Bath Seat | 251B, 251O, 251P, 251Y | Green with orange tray, orange with beige tray or yellow with green tray Ultra 2 in 1 Infant Bath Tub and Toddler Bath Seat | 252B, 252P | Solid pink, blue or white body and a blue or pink bottom Niagra Baby Bath Seat | 253B, 253G, 253P, 253Y | White or blue body with a green, pink or orange insert

Sold at: Small retail stores and online retailers including Amazon.com and Wayfair.com from July 2012 through September 2012 for between $25 and $40.

Manufactured in: China

Remedy: Consumers should stop using the recalled bath seats immediately and contact Dream On Me to receive a free replacement bath tub.

Consumer Contact: Dream On Me toll-free at (877) 201-4317 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday or online at www.dreamonme.com and click on Recalls for more information.

Source: http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml13/13061.html

Dream on Me Bath Seat

Dream on Me Baby Bath Seats (model 251)

Dream On Me Recall

Dream on Me Baby Bath Seats (model 251)

Recall Dream on Me Bath Seat

 

Dream on Me Baby Bath Seats (model 252)

Dream on Me recall

Dream on Me Baby Baths Seats (model 253)

Your Baby

Chubby Baby = Obese Child?

2.00 to read

“Look at those cute little rolls of fat and chubby cheeks.” “It’s just baby-fat, he’ll grow out of it.” Common comments when people see a chubby baby. But, what was once thought of as a well-fed and healthy infant might prove to be just the opposite.

Researchers say they’ve found a way to determine if a rapid growing baby will become obese later in life. A new study says that if your baby has passed two key milestones, on a doctor’s growth chart by the age of two, then he or she has double the risk of being obese by the age of 5.  Rapid growers were also more likely to be obese at age 10, and infants whose chart numbers climbed that much during their first 6 months faced the greatest risks.

Children who grew more slowly were less likely to be obese by the same age.

That kind of rapid growth should be a red flag to doctors, and a sign to parents that babies might be overfed or spending too much time in strollers and not enough crawling around, said pediatrician Dr. Elsie Taveras, the study's lead author and an obesity researcher at Harvard Medical School.

Contrary to the idea that chubby babies are the picture of health, the study bolsters evidence that "bigger is not better" in infants, she said.

In an online article on healthland.time.com Dr. Michelle Lampl, director of Emory University's Center for the Study of Human Health, expressed concerns.

“It’s a bad idea that could backfire in the long run,” said Lampl.

"It reads like a very handy rule and sounds like it would be very useful _ and that's my concern," Lampl said. The guide would be easy to use to justify feeding infants less and to unfairly label them as fat. It could also prompt feeding patterns that could lead to obesity later, she said.

Lampl noted that many infants studied crossed at least two key points on growth charts; yet only 12 percent were obese at age 5 and slightly more at age 10. Nationally, about 10 percent of preschool-aged children are obese, versus about 19 percent of those aged 6 to 11.

Taveras said the rapid growth shown in the study should be used to raise awareness and not to put babies on a diet.

The study involved 45,000 infants and children younger than age 11 who had routine growth measurements during doctor checkups in the Boston area from 1980 through 2008.

Growth charts help pediatricians plot weight, length in babies and height in older kids in relation to other children their same age and sex. Pediatricians sometimes combine an infant's measures to calculate weight-for-length _ the equivalent of body-mass index, or BMI, a height-to-weight ratio used in older children and adults.

The charts are organized into percentiles. For example, infants at the 75th percentile for weight are heavier than 75 percent of their peers.

An infant whose weight-for-length jumped from the 19th percentile at 1 month to the 77th at 6 months crossed three major percentiles _ the 25th, 50th and 75th _ and would be at risk for obesity later in childhood, the authors said.

Larger infants were most at risk for obesity later on, but even smaller babies whose growth crossed at least two percentiles were at greater risk than those who grew more slowly.

About 40 percent of infants crossed at least two percentiles by age 6 months. An analysis of more than one-third of the study children found that 64 percent grew that rapidly by age 2.

Dr. Joanna Lewis, a pediatrician at Advocate Lutheran General Hospital in Park Ridge, Ill., said she supports the idea that infancy is not too young to start thinking about obesity.

Still, she emphasized that rapid growth in infancy doesn't mean babies are doomed to become obese. "It's not a life sentence," and there are steps parents can take to keep their babies at a healthy weight without restrictive diets, she said.

Lewis said many of her patients are large babies whose parents feed them juice or solid food despite guidelines recommending nothing but breast milk or formula in the first six months.

"The study reinforces what we try to tell parents already: Delay starting solids and don't put juice in a bottle," Lewis said.

Your Baby

Mom Slaps Baby On Flight

A mother slaps her baby on a flight and the flight attendant takes the away to console. Did the flight attendant act properly?There were a few tense moments on a Southwest Airlines flight this week.

According to witnesses on the flight from Dallas to Albuquerque, a mother slapped her crying baby’s face during the flight and a Southwest flight attendant took the baby away from the family to console the child. Southwest Airlines said “the family was visibly having some heated discussions.” The flight attendant returned the child to the parents just before the plane landed.  Police were waiting at the gate when the flight arrived and questioned the couple, flight attendant and witnesses.  The child was returned to the parents and they were neither cited nor charged. Did the flight attendant act properly?  What do you think?  How do you control a crying or fussy child on a flight? Let is know and leave your comments below!

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Your Baby

Acetaminophen May Raise Asthma Risk

A new study shows infants who have been given acetaminophen may have a higher risk of developing asthma and eczema by the time they are six or seven.A new study out shows that infants who have been given the common pain reliever acetaminophen may have a higher risk of developing asthma and eczema by the time they are six or seven. The study of over 200-thousand children in 31 countries, published in the journal Lancet, found that acetaminophen use in the first year of life was associated with a 46 percent higher risk of asthma by the time the children were six or seven compared to those never exposed to the drug.

Medium use of acetaminophen in the past 12 months increased asthma risk by 61 percent, which high dosages of once a month or more in the past year raised the risk by three times. The study defined medium use as once per year or more but less than once a month. "Acetaminophen can reduce antioxidant levels and ...that can give oxidative stress in the lungs and cause asthma," says one of the researchers, Richard Beasley with the Medical Research Institute of New Zealand. Researchers emphasize that acetaminophen should remain the preferred drug to relieve pain and fever in children because one of the alternatives, aspirin, is linked to the risk of Reye's Syndrome, a rare but serious complication in children. "The findings do lend support to the current guidelines of the World Health Organization, which recommend that acetaminophen should not be used routinely, but should be reserved for children with a high fever" the researchers wrote.

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