Your Baby

Starting Baby on Solid Foods

Your goal over the next few months is to introduce a wide variety of foods. If your baby doesn't seem to like a particular food, reintroduce it at later meals. It can take quite a few tries before kids warm up to certain foods.Starting baby on solid foods can be an exciting and perplexing time for parents. What foods should I start with? How much? How often?

The American Academy of Pediatrics currently recommends gradually introducing solid foods when a baby is about 6 months old. Your pediatrician, however, may recommend starting as early as 4 months depending on your baby's readiness and nutritional needs. Be sure to check with your pediatrician before starting any solid foods. Is your baby ready? Breast milk or formula is the only food your newborn needs. Within four to six months, however, your baby will begin to develop the coordination to move solid food from the front of the mouth to the back for swallowing. At the same time, your baby's head control will improve and he or she will learn to sit with support — essential skills for eating solid foods. If you're not sure whether your baby is ready, ask yourself these questions: •       Can your baby hold his or her head in a steady, upright position? •       Can your baby sit with support? •       Is your baby interested in what you're eating? If you answer yes to these questions and you have the OK from your baby's doctor or dietitian, you can begin supplementing your baby's liquid diet. What Foods to Start With. Continue feeding your baby breast milk or formula as usual. Then: •       Start with baby cereal. Mix 1 tablespoon (15 milliliters) of a single-grain, iron-fortified baby cereal with 4 to 5 tablespoons (60 to 75 milliliters) of breast milk or formula. Many parents start with rice cereal. Even if the cereal barely thickens the liquid, resist the temptation to serve it from a bottle. Instead, help your baby sit upright and offer the cereal with a small spoon once or twice a day. Once your baby gets the hang of swallowing runny cereal, mix it with less liquid. For variety, you might offer single-grain oatmeal or barley cereals. Your baby may take a little while to "learn" how to eat solids. During these months you'll still be providing the usual feedings of breast milk or formula, so don't be concerned if your baby refuses certain foods at first or doesn't seem interested. It may just take some time. Do not add cereal to your baby's bottle unless your doctor instructs you to do so, as this can cause babies to become overweight and doesn't help the baby learn how to eat solid foods •       Add pureed meat, vegetables and fruits. Once your baby masters cereal, gradually introduce pureed meat, vegetables and fruits. Offer single-ingredient foods at first, and wait three to five days between each new food. If your baby has a reaction to a particular food — such as diarrhea, a rash or vomiting — you'll know the culprit. •       Offer finely chopped finger foods. By ages 8 months to 10 months, most babies can handle small portions of finely chopped finger foods, such as soft fruits, well-cooked pasta, cheese, graham crackers and ground meat. As your baby approaches his or her first birthday, mashed or chopped versions of whatever the rest of the family is eating will become your baby's main fare. Continue to offer breast milk or formula with and between meals. Foods to Avoid for Now. Some foods are generally withheld until later. Do not give eggs, cow's milk, citrus fruits and juices, and honey until after a baby's first birthday. Eggs (especially the whites) may cause an allergic reaction, especially if given too early. Citrus is highly acidic and can cause painful diaper rashes for a baby. Honey may contain certain spores that, while harmless to adults, can cause botulism in babies. Regular cow's milk does not have the nutrition that infants need. Fish and seafood, peanuts and peanut butter, and tree nuts are also considered allergenic for infants, and shouldn't be given until after the child is 2 or 3 years old, depending on whether the child is at higher risk for developing food allergies. A child is at higher risk for food allergies if one or more close family members have allergies or allergy-related conditions, like food allergies, eczema, or asthma. Introducing Juice. Juice can be given after 6 months of age, which is also a good age to introduce your baby to a cup. Buy one with large handles and a lid (a "sippy cup"), and teach your baby how to maneuver and drink from it. You might need to try a few different cups to find one that works for your child. Use water at first to avoid messy clean-ups. Serve only 100% fruit juice, not juice drinks or powdered drink mixes. Do not give juice in a bottle and remember to limit the amount of juice your baby drinks to less than 4 total ounces (120 ml) a day. Too much juice adds extra calories without the nutrition of breast milk or formula. Drinking too much juice can contribute to obesity can cause diarrhea. Infants usually like fruits and sweeter vegetables, such as carrots and sweet potatoes, but don't neglect other vegetables. Your goal over the next few months is to introduce a wide variety of foods. If your baby doesn't seem to like a particular food, reintroduce it at later meals. It can take quite a few tries before kids warm up to certain foods.

Your Baby

FDA Finds Traces of Melamine in U.S. Formula

Traces of the industrial chemical melamine have been detected in samples of top-selling U.S. infant formula, but federal regulators insist the products are safe. "The levels that we are detecting are extremely low," said Dr. Stephen Sundlof, director of the FDA's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. "They should not be changing the diet. If they've been feeding a particular product, they should continue to feed that product. That's in the best interest of the your-baby."

The Food and Drug Administration said last month it was unable to identify any melamine exposure level as safe for infants, but a top official said it would be a "dangerous overreaction" for parents to stop feeding infant formula to babies who depend on it. Melamine is a chemical that has been found recently in Chinese infant formula, although in much larger concentrations. It has been blamed for killing at least 3 infants in China and causing at least 50,000 other children sick. Melamine is used in some U.S. plastic food packaging. It can sometimes rub off onto what we eat. The Associated Press obtained previously undisclosed tests under the Freedom of Information Act. Those tests show the FDA had detected melamine in a sample of one popular formula and the presence of cyanuric acid, which is a chemical relative of melamine in the formula of a second manufacturer. A third large formula maker told The Associated Press that in-house tests had detected melamine in its infant formula. Those three companies, Abbott Laboratories, Nestle and Mead Johnson, make more than 90 percent of all infant formula produced in the United States. The FDA and other experts said the melamine contamination in U.S.-made formula had occurred during the manufacturing process, rather than intentionally.

Your Baby

Pampers® Pacifiers, Bed-Side Sleepers Recalled

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"Pampers ® Natural Stages Pacifier" and “Infant Bed-Side Sleepers” by Arm’s Reach Concepts are being recalled by the CPSC due to choking hazards from the pacifier, and entrapment and fall hazards from the sleepers. Parents are urged to stop using both of these products at once. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has issued two new recalls for products affecting infants.

The first recalled product is “Infant Bed-Side Sleepers” by Arm’s Reach Concepts. About 76,000 Bed-Side Sleepers have been sold. When the fabric liner is not used or is not securely attached, infants can fall from the raised mattress into the loose fabric at the bottom of the bed-side sleeper or can become entrapped between the edge of the mattress and the side of the sleeper, posing risks of suffocation. CPSC and Arm's Reach have received 10 reports of infants falling from the raised mattress into the bottom of the sleeper or becoming entrapped between the edge of the mattress and the side of the bed-side sleeper. No injuries have been reported. This recall involves a product called a "co-sleeper" by the manufacturer. One side of the bed-side sleepers is lower than the others to allow positioning near a bed and access to the infant for care and feeding. This recall includes all Arm's Reach Original and Universal styles with manufacture dates between September 1997 and December 2001. The manufacture date and model number can be found on a sticker on one of the product's legs. Model numbers included in the recall begin with: Originals - 8108, 8133, 8111, 8112 & 8199  - Universal – 8311 The Bed-Side Sleepers were sold at Burlington Coat Factory, Babies R Us and other retail stores nationwide from September 1997 through December 2001 for about $160. Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled bed-side sleepers and visit www.armsreach.com/instructions to view and download assembly instructions and to make sure that the product is properly configured. Consumers should also contact the company by phone or via the company website to receive hard-copy instructions by mail and an assembly/warning label. Consumers who are missing the fabric liner or other components should immediately contact Arm's Reach for an alternative remedy. The next recall is Pampers(r) Natural Stages Infant Ortho and Bulb Pacifiers. The “Pampers Natural Stages Pacifiers” are being recalled due to possible choking hazards.  About 29,000 of the pacifiers were sold at retail stores nationwide from April 2010 through February 2011 for about $6.00. The pacifiers are made in China and distributed through Key Baby LLC, and fail to meet federal safety standards. Consumers should immediately take the recalled pacifiers away from infants and contact Key Baby for instructions on returning the product for a full refund or $10 coupon toward the purchase of any Pampers(r) Natural Stages products. For additional information, contact Key Baby toll-free at (800) 447-1224 anytime, or visit the company's web site at www.key-baby.com Arm's Reach Bed-Side SleeperPampers Natural Stage Pacifiers

Your Baby

Small Birth Size Linked to Sleep Problems Later

Children who were born at a relatively small size may be more likely than their peers to have sleep difficulties, a new study suggests. The study, which appears in the journal Sleep, included 289 8-year-olds born healthy and full-term. It found that the lower the children's weight and length at birth, the greater their odds of having poor sleep or sleep disturbances such as sleep-related breathing problems or nightmares.

What's more, mothers' prenatal drinking -- a habit that can impair fetal growth and development -- was linked to a greater risk of childhood sleep problems. The researchers report it is possible that in some children, smaller birth size is a marker of alterations in nervous system development, which might affect the body's sleep regulation later in life. "We showed that even within children born healthy and at-term gestation, smaller body size at birth increases the risk for poor sleep," said lead researcher Dr. Anu-Katriina Pesonen, of the University of Helsinki in Finland. That does not mean, however, that every child born at a relatively small size is destined for sleep difficulties. For one, birth size is partially determined by genetics, and Pesonen said it's possible that the current findings do not pertain to newborns who are simply naturally on the smaller size. On the other hand, she said, factors that can impair normal fetal growth -- which, besides prenatal drinking, include prenatal smoking and high chronic stress levels -- may help set the stage for sleep problems later on. For their study, Pesonen and her colleagues had each child wear an actigraph -- a watch-like device that measures sleep and activity patterns -- for one week. Their parents also completed a standard questionnaire on childhood sleep disturbances. In general, the researchers found, the smaller a child was at birth, the greater the likelihood of sleep disturbances or low sleep efficiency. Sleep efficiency refers to a person's ability to fall asleep and stay asleep once the head hits the pillow. In this study, 26 children had low sleep efficiency -- spending roughly three-quarters or less of their time in bed actually asleep. The researchers also found an association between sleep problems and mothers' prenatal drinking, even at relatively moderate levels. Among children whose mothers had consumed more than one drink per week during pregnancy, the risks of short sleep duration -- less than 7.5 hours per night -- and low sleep efficiency were about three times higher compared with other children. Prenatal smoking was not linked to sleep problems. However, Pesonen's team notes, this could be because few mothers in the study said they had smoked during pregnancy, limiting the study's ability to find an association. For now, the researchers conclude, the findings suggest that even moderate levels of drinking during pregnancy, and birth size variations within the normal range, may affect children's sleep later on.

Your Baby

Mother’s Migraines linked to Colic in Babies

1.45 to read

No one knows for sure why babies get colic. Colicky babies cry non-stop and don’t respond to being comforted. It can push a new parent over the edge and even the most experienced parent, who has to watch their baby cry in pain, can be moved to tears themselves.

A new study from the University of California, San Francisco suggests that mothers who suffer migraine headaches are more than twice as likely to have babies with colic than mothers without a history of migraines.

The study raises the question - are the two linked? It’s an important question because excessive crying is one of the most common triggers for shaken baby syndrome, which can cause death, brain damage and severe disability, the researchers said.

"If we can understand what is making the babies cry, we may be able to protect them from this very dangerous outcome," said Amy Gelfand, MD, a child neurologist with the Headache Center at UCSF who will present the findings in April at the American Academy of Neurology's 64th annual meeting.

Colic in healthy babies has long been associated with gastrointestinal problems. But, after 50 years of studies no defining link has been established. Babies who are fed solely breast milk are as likely to have colic as those fed formula, and giving colicky babies medication for gas does not help.

In the UCSF study, Gelfand and her colleagues surveyed 154 new mothers bringing their infants to the pediatrician for routine checkups at two months, the age when colicky crying typically peaks. The mothers were surveyed about their babies' crying patterns and their own history of migraine, and those responses were analyzed to make sure the reported crying fit the clinical definition of colic.

Mothers who suffered migraines were found to be 2 1/2 times as likely to have colicky babies. Overall, 29% of infants whose mothers had migraines had colic compared to 11% of babies whose mothers did not have migraines.

The researchers believe that colic may be an early manifestation of symptoms known as childhood periodic syndrome. These symptoms could be a precursor to migraine headaches later in life. Babies with colic may be more sensitive to a stimulated environment; much like migraine sufferers are affected by light and loud sounds.

The UCSF researchers’ plan to study a group of colicky babies over the course of their childhood to see if they develop other childhood periodic syndromes, such as abdominal migraine.

If you believe your baby has colic, check with your pediatrician. There are comfort strategies that have helped some babies respond positively.

Source: http://news.nurse.com/article/20120220/NATIONAL02/102270023

Your Baby

How Much Water Does Your Baby Need?

2.00 to read

Since most of the country is sweltering with summer heat and temperatures well into the upper 90’s and even over 100 degrees, I guess I can understand parents’ concerns about giving their babies water. It seemed like a strange question to me when I first started hearing, “Dr. Sue, how much water does my baby need to drink every day?”  I know I am continuing to talk about staying hydrated during the heat wave, but we are really talking about those children and adults who are spending time outdoors, especially when involved in physical activity.

I have actually been telling parents with newborns that there is really no reason to take that sweet new baby outside for any length of time. I think it is too hot to enjoy being outside, and an infant doesn’t miss going to the playground like a 2 or 3 year old would.

But, when you have young children you have to get out (or go crazy inside everyday), so everyone just suffers through the heat. Remember to take your sunscreen and fluids and head out for an hour or two, in the morning or later afternoon if at all possible. These children need lots of water breaks, as do their parents and caregivers.

So, back to the water and baby question. Infants in the first 6 months are getting fed breast milk or formula which is made up of free water, so therefore a baby is staying hydrated by eating every  2 -3 hours. A baby doesn’t “need” water every day for any particular reason.

With that being said, it does not mean that your baby cannot have a bottle of water. This is especially true for a breast fed infant whose mother may have run out for an hour but is coming back to breast feed.  But what if the baby awakens or gets hungry 30 min or so prior to mother getting home.  This might be a good time to “stall” by giving the baby a bottle of water, rather than formula. In this case it is fine to use tap water (yes bottled water is not necessary, unless you have a well or something) in a bottle and see if the baby will even take it. Most babies don’t just gulp down 8 ounces of water!

If you are out in the heat with an infant, just remember to feed them every 2 – 3 hours and make sure they have nice drool in their mouths and wet diapers. If you are concerned about hydration take along a bottle of water for both you and your baby. You will probably need it more than your baby!

That’s your daily dose for today.  We’ll chat again tomorrow.

 

 

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Your Baby

Rise in Infant Suffocations Tied to Bed-Sharing

Rates in the United States of sudden infant death from suffocation or strangulation have quadrupled in the past 20 years.

Rates in the United States of sudden infant death from suffocation or strangulation have quadrupled in the past 20 years, most apparently from parents sleeping with their babies, a new government study found. The trend is clear, despite successful campaigns to prevent SIDS by putting babies to sleep on their backs, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported in Pediatrics. Black male babies are the most affected, but it is not clear why. "Infant mortality rates attributable to accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed have quadrupled since 1984," the CDC's Carrie Shapiro-Mendoza and colleagues wrote. "Prevention efforts should target those at highest risk and focus on helping parents and caregivers provide safer sleeping environments." Researchers looked at data from 1984 to 2004. It showed that sudden, unexpected infant deaths fell over the 20-year period. Rates of strangulation or suffocation, however, rose by 14 percent between 1996 and 2004. Evidence shows that babies should be laid to sleep alone, on a flat mattress, with no loose pillows or blankets and in a crib with bars designed to prevent entrapment.

Your Baby

Infant Medicine Recall

1.45 to read

“Out of an abundance of caution”, Perrigo Co. has issued a voluntary recall of 18 batches of their over-the-counter liquid acetaminophen that is used to treat fever and aches and pains in infants.

The recall is not because of a problem with the medicine itself, but because a small number of boxes may contain a dispensing syringe without dose markings.

The medicine is sold under a variety of brand names including Babies R Us and Care One.  The list of labels and batch numbers of the recalled product are listed below.

Label and Batches

BABIES R US- 3KK0606

CARE ONE -3HK0564

EQUALINE - 3HK0672

EQUATE - 3HK0672, 3JK0433, 3JK0594, 3JK0595, 3JK0653, 3JK0673, 3KK0815,

3KK0817

HARMON FACE VALUES - 3JK0594

HEALTH MART - 3HK0671

HEALTHY ACCENTS - 3HK0671, 3KK0606

HEB - 3KK0606

KROGER - 3GK0645, 3GK0704, 3HK0671, 3JK0433, 3JK0595, 3JK0653, 3JK0433,

3JK0595, 3GK0645, 3GK0704, 3JK0595

LEADER DRUG - 3JK0433, 3JK0594

MEIJER - 3JK0594, 3JK0597

PUBLIX - 3JK0595

RITE AID - 3GK0704

TOPCARE - 3KK0359, 3KK0494

UP & UP - 3HK0672

WALGREEN - 3GK0704, 3HK0564, 3HK0671, 3JK0433, 3JK0595, 3JK0610, 3KK0360

Giving infants the correct dose of acetaminophen is very important when treating them for an illness or injury. Too much acetaminophen can overload the liver’s ability to process the drug safely and can lead to a life-threatening condition.

According to Perrigo’s press release about the recall, if you have purchased a package that contains an oral dosing device that does not have dose markings, the consumer should not use the product and should call Perrigo's Consumer Affairs Department, toll free, 1-800-719-9260. Consumers should contact their physician or healthcare provider if they have any questions, or if they or their children experience any problem that could possibly be related to this drug product.

No injuries have been reported to Perrigo at this time.

Source: http://perrigo.investorroom.com/2013-11-01-Perrigo-Initiates-Nationwide-Voluntary-Product-Recall-Of-Acetaminophen-Infant-Suspension-Liquid-160-mg-5-mL-Due-To-A-Potential-Defect-With-The-Co-Packaged-Oral-Syringe

Michael Calia, http://online.wsj.com/article/BT-CO-20131101-711768.html?dsk=y&mod=dist_smartbrief

Unmarked syringe

Your Baby

Recall: Dream On Me Bath Seats

2:00 to read

Dream On Me Bath Seats are being recalled by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) due to the product’s failure to meet federal safety standards and one near drowning of a 12-month-old baby girl. Consumers, who own this product, should stop using it immediately.

Name of Product: Dream On Me Bath Seats

Units: About 50,000

Importer: Dream On Me Inc., of South Plainfield, N.J.

Hazard: The bath seats fail to meet federal safety standards, including the requirements for stability. Specifically, the bath seats can tip over, posing a risk of drowning to babies.

Incidents/Injuries: CPSC and Dream On Me have received five reports involving these bath seats, including a report of a near drowning involving a 12-month-old baby girl. The baby did not require medical treatment.

Description: The recall includes all Dream On Me bath seats. Some of the seats have a Dream On Me label under or on the rear of the bath seats. Model numbers are also printed underneath the bath seats and on the product packaging and include the following product models and colors:

Model Name | Model Number | Color

Baby Bath Seat | 251B, 251O, 251P, 251Y | Green with orange tray, orange with beige tray or yellow with green tray Ultra 2 in 1 Infant Bath Tub and Toddler Bath Seat | 252B, 252P | Solid pink, blue or white body and a blue or pink bottom Niagra Baby Bath Seat | 253B, 253G, 253P, 253Y | White or blue body with a green, pink or orange insert

Sold at: Small retail stores and online retailers including Amazon.com and Wayfair.com from July 2012 through September 2012 for between $25 and $40.

Manufactured in: China

Remedy: Consumers should stop using the recalled bath seats immediately and contact Dream On Me to receive a free replacement bath tub.

Consumer Contact: Dream On Me toll-free at (877) 201-4317 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday or online at www.dreamonme.com and click on Recalls for more information.

Source: http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml13/13061.html

Dream on Me Bath Seat

Dream on Me Baby Bath Seats (model 251)

Dream On Me Recall

Dream on Me Baby Bath Seats (model 251)

Recall Dream on Me Bath Seat

 

Dream on Me Baby Bath Seats (model 252)

Dream on Me recall

Dream on Me Baby Baths Seats (model 253)

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