Your Baby

Fisher-Price Recalls Rock ‘N Play Infant Sleepers

1.45 to read

Fisher-Price in co-operation with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is recalling its Rock ‘N Play Infant Sleepers because of 600 reports of mold, posing a risk to infants sleeping in the product.

The CPSC advises that mold has been associated with respiratory illnesses and other infections. Although mold is not present at the time of purchase, mold growth can occur after use of the product.

Incidents/Injuries: Fisher-Price has received 600 reports of mold on the product. Sixteen consumers have reported that their infants have been treated for respiratory issues, coughs and hives after sleeping in the product.

Description: This recall to inspect includes all Fisher-Price Rock N' Play infant recliner seats called sleepers. The sleeper is designed for babies up to 25 pounds and is composed of a soft plastic seat held by a metal rocking frame. The product has a removable, fabric cover that is sold in 14 patterns and color palettes.

Sold at: Mass merchandise stores nationwide and online since September 2009 for between $50 and $85. Units currently in retail stores are not affected by this recall to inspect. Only products that show signs of mold after use by consumers are included in this announcement.

Manufactured in: China

Remedy: Consumers should immediately check for mold under the removable seat cushion. Dark brown, gray or black spots can indicate the presence of mold. If mold is found, consumers should immediately stop using the product. Consumers can contact Fisher-Price for cleaning instructions or further assistance. Cleaning and care instructions can also be found at www.service.mattel.com or by contacting the firm.

Consumer Contact: Fisher-Price; at (800) 432-5437, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. ET Monday through Friday, or online at www.service.mattel.com for more information.

Source: http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml13/13087.html

Fisher-Price Rock'N Play sleeper

 

Fisher-Price Rock 'N Roll Infant Sleeper

Your Baby

Recall: Infant Video Monitor Rechargeable Batteries

2:00 to read

In cooperation with the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), Summer Infant, Inc. announced a voluntary recall to replace certain rechargeable batteries in baby video monitors due to overheating and burn hazards.

The recall involves about 800,000 rechargeable batteries in certain Summer Infant handheld color video monitors. The rechargeable batteries in the monitors are about 1 ½” tall by 2 ¼” wide and are ¼” thick, black, and are marked with TCL on the lower right corner of the battery. 

Monitors are sold with a matching camera and A/C adaptors. The rechargeable battery can only be found in the monitor. Batteries that may be affected will include a letter & number combination in the beginning of the serial number on the back of the battery.

The battery in certain handheld video monitors can overheat and rupture, posing a burn hazard to consumers.

Summer Infant has received 22 reports of overheated batteries and ruptured batteries, including incidents of smoke and minor property damage.

Consumers should stop using this product and remove the battery. You can complete the online form to receive a replacement battery.  The monitor can continue to be used on AC power with power cord.

The product was sold at mass merchants, online retailers and independent juvenile specialty stores from about February 2010 through 2012 for approximately $149-$349.

Consumers can go online at www.summerinfant.com/alerts/batterty-recall to fill out a replacement battery form and for instructions on how to replace the battery. There is also a link where you can view the recalled batteries, battery numbers and the monitors that are affected.

Source: http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2014/Summer-Infant-Expands-Recall-to-Replace-Video-Monitor-Rechargeable-Batteries/

Summer Infant battery recall

Your Baby

Nap Nanny Recliners Recall

2.00 to read

Baby Matters, the company that makes Nap Nanny recliners, claims the product is safe when used as directed, but the Consumer Product Safety Commission  (CPSC) says the baby recliner is dangerous and is responsible for 5 infant deaths and numerous injuries.

In an unusual move, CPSC has teamed up with four major retailers who say they will recall the product themselves after Baby Matters refused to issue a voluntary recall.

Amazon.com, Buy Buy Baby, Diapers.com and Toys “R” Us/Babies “R” Us had already agreed earlier this month to stop selling the product. Now they are offering customers a chance to return the Nap Nanny.

CPSC spokesman Scott Wolfson praised the companies.

“The retailers were great. They were not obligated to carry out this recall,” he said. It’s estimated that 150,000 of the Nap Nanny have been purchased since the product came on the market in 2009. The recliners sell for around $125.00.

CPSC has been in negotiations with Baby Matters for a mandatory recall but the owner of the company and creator of the Nap Nanny, Leslie Gudel, says the product is safe.

In email, Gudel told ABC News, “Baby Matters is disappointed to hear that four retailers have chosen to voluntarily recall the Nap Nanny.  As I’ve said before, the loss of an infant is an unthinkable tragedy, and I am truly heartbroken for the families who have lost a child.  But when the Nap Nanny has been used properly, no infant has ever suffered an injury requiring medical attention.”

This isn’t the first time the product has been recalled. The initial versions of the Nap Nanny were recalled and redesigned in 2010 after the first reported death. The sides were raised, additional warnings added, and an instructional video was added to the company’s website.

CPSC says the Nap Nanny recliners have continued to cause infants to suffer injuries and deaths. The government agency believes the product contains design defects, as well as defects in the warnings and instructions.

It has taken the rare step of suing Baby Matters to force a recall. Even though the major retailers have intiated a recall of their own, because smaller privately owned stores continue to sell the Nap Nanny recliner, CPSC believes the recall is necessary. Since the 2010 recall, CPSC has received an additional 70 reports of children nearly falling out of the product.

The Nap Nanny website has posted a letter to consumers from Gudel discussing the lawsuit. Gudel writes, “In July of this year we learned that an infant died in a crib in which a Nap Nanny Chill was present. Unfortunately, the baby was placed in the Nap Nanny without a cover and without being secured by the harness. The infant was found in the crib, outside the Nap Nanny, near loose blankets. The cause of death was Sudden Unexplained Infant Death with accidental asphyxia not excluded.

Upon learning the news of this incident, the CPSC reversed course and informed us that it deemed the Nap Nanny Chill unsafe because of what the Commission described as “reasonably foreseeable use.” In addition, the CPSC now says the warning labels are “inadequate.” These are the same warning labels the CPSC helped us write and approved two years ago. They are also claiming the harness is “defective” in that it’s difficult to adjust the waist straps, making it less likely parents will use the harness. The changes to the harness on the Nap Nanny Chill were made at the urging of the CPSC two years ago.”

Meantime, Gudel shut down her company because, she said, it couldn’t afford to continue the fight with the CPSC. She continued to defend the product and told ABC News in her email, “We look forward to presenting our case before a judge who will hear all of the facts.”

The Nap Nanny is a portable baby recliner that is designed for sleep or play. It contains a deep seat made of foam and comes with a fitted fabric and a three point harness.

CPSC contends that the products “pose a substantial risk of injury or death to infants.” It is also urging consumers to return the Nap Nanny if they bought it from one of the retailers who are now voluntarily recalling the product.

Sources: http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/business/2012/12/after-5-deaths-stores-recall-nap-nanny-recliners/

http://www.myhealthnewsdaily.com/3397-retailers-agree-to-stop-sale-recall-nap-nanny-recliners.html

http://www.napnanny.com

 

Nap Nanny recliner

Your Baby

Should Women Eat Fish While Pregnant?

2.00 to read

Fish are high in several beneficial nutrients, including some that are related to healthy brain development. But several organizations, including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), recommend that women who are pregnant limit the amount of fish they eat.

The reason is that most fish and shellfish contain low-levels of methylmercury.

Almost all people have at least trace amounts of methylmercury in their tissues, reflecting the organic compound’s widespread presence in the environment. Fetuses, infants and children are the most vulnerable to the possible adverse effects of mercury exposure.

One of the major concerns of the medical community and mothers-to-be is the possibility of a link between eating fish that contains mercury, and their child developing autism.  

A new study addresses that concern and says that children exposed to low levels of mercury in the womb because their mothers ate large amounts of fish, don’t appear to be at an increased risk for autism.

The new findings from more than 30 years of research in the Republic of Seychelles -- a group of islands in the western Indian Ocean -- found no such link, the study authors said.

"This study shows no evidence of a correlation between low level mercury exposure and autism spectrum-like behaviors among children whose mothers ate, on average, up to 12 meals of fish each week during pregnancy," study lead author Edwin van Wijngaarden, associate professor in the public health sciences department at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York, said in a medical center news release.

"These findings contribute to the growing body of literature that suggest that exposure to the chemical does not play an important role in the onset of these behaviors," he added.

One autism expert added a note of caution, however.

"The study found no link between high mercury levels and later autism spectrum disorder behaviors. However, this should not be taken to mean that high levels of mercury are safe to ingest," said Alycia Hallday, senior director of environmental and clinical science at the advocacy group Autism Speaks.

"Other studies comparing this [Seychelles] cohort to those in other parts of the world indicate that this cohort may be spared from many adverse effects because it is consumed with nutrient-rich ocean fish," she explained.

For the study, the researchers initially determined the level of prenatal mercury exposure by analyzing the mothers' hair samples. Then the researchers used two questionnaires -- one given to parents, the other to the children's teachers -- to see if the children showed signs of autism spectrum-like behaviors. The tests included questions on language skills, communication skills and repetitive behaviors. While the tests don't give a definitive diagnosis, they are used widely in the United States as an initial screening tool and may indicate the need for additional testing, the researchers said.

The study also noted the concerns of and limitations recommended by the FDA and other organizations.

"This study shows no consistent association in children with mothers with mercury levels that were six to 10 times higher than those found in the U.S. and Europe. This is a sentinel population and if (the association between low-level mercury exposure and autism) does not exist here than it probably does not exist," Philip Davidson, principal investigator of the Seychelles Child Development Study and professor emeritus in pediatrics at the University of Rochester Medical Center, said in the news release.

The finding lends support to an emerging belief that the good may outweigh the possible bad when it comes to eating fish during pregnancy. Specifically, if the mercury did not harm brain development at the levels of exposure experienced by the children in this study, then the benefits of the nutrients in fish may counteract or surpass the potential negative effects of mercury, the study authors said.

So, which fish have “low” or “high” mercury content? The American Pregnancy Association provides this list on their website.

Highest Mercury

AVOID

  • Marlin
  • Orange roughy
  • Tilefish
  • Swordfish
  • Shark
  • Mackerel (king)
  • Tuna (bigeye, Ahi)

High Mercury

Eat no more than three 6-oz servings per month

  • Sea Bass (Chilean)
  • Bluefish
  • Grouper
  • Mackerel (Spanish, Gulf)
  • Tuna (canned, white albacore) See tuna chart below
  • Tuna (Yellow fin)

Lower Mercury

Eat no more than six 6-oz servings per month

  • Bass (Striped, Black)
  • Carp
  • Cod (Alaskan)
  • Croaker (White Pacific)
  • Halibut ( Pacific and Atlantic) Jacksmelt ( Silverside)
  • Lobster
  • Mahi Mahi
  • Monkfish
  • Perch (freshwater)
  • Sablefish
  • Skate
  • Snapper
  • Sea Trout (Weakfish)
  • Tuna (canned, chunk light)
  • Tuna (Skipjack)

Lowest Mercury

Enjoy two 6-oz servings per week

  • Anchovies
  • Butterfish
  • Catfish
  • Clam
  • Crab (Domestic)
  • Crawfish/crayfish
  • Croaker
  • Flounder
  • Haddock
  • Hake
  • Herring
  • Mackerel (N Atlantic, Chub)
  • Mullet
  • Oysters
  • Perch (ocean)
  • Plaice
  • Salmon (Canned, Fresh)
  • Sardines
  • Scallops
  • Shad (American)
  • Shrimp
  • Sole
  • Squid (Calamari)
  • Tilapia
  • Trout (freshwater)
  • Whitefish
  • Whiting

The study was published online July 23 in the journal Epidemiology

Sources: http://consumer.healthday.com/pregnancy-information-29/pregnancy-news-543/breaking-brief-7-23-mercury-autism-epidemiology-urmc-release-678533.html

http://americanpregnancy.org/pregnancyhealth/fishmercury.htm

http://www.epa.gov/hg/effects.htm

Your Baby

Kids Left In Car Alert Devises Aren't Reliable

1:45 to read

It’s hot outside, but inside a car that's not running, it can be an oven. When the temperature is 88 degrees outside, a closed car will be 99 degrees in 10 minute. In 20 minutes it will be 117 degrees. During a typical Texas summer, it’s likely to be 100 degrees outside by noon.

Every summer children are left in hot cars and die. These are all preventable deaths.

Products designed to prevent parents and caregivers from accidentally leaving babies and toddlers in cars have become quite popular. But a review of 18 commercial devices, including systems integrated into a car, shows none works well enough to rely on.

“While these devices are very well-intended, none of them are a full or complete solution for making sure a parent never leaves a baby behind in a hot car,” David Strickland, administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), told reporters.

NHTSA says 527 children have died of heat stroke after being left in cars since 1998, or about 38 every year. “In 2011, 33 such cases were reported,” NHTSA said in a statement, citing Jan Null of San Francisco State University, who tracks the reports.

“We aren’t only talking about the 98 degree day when you leave your child for eight hours while you are at work,” said Dr. Kristy Arbogast of The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, who led the research. “This can happen very quickly.”

Arbogast and colleagues reviewed every product they could find: pads that sense if a child is in his or her car seat; devices that detect whether the seatbelt is buckled; chest clips that attach to the restraint; sensors that can tell if the back door was opened; and alarms that remind parents to check. They thoroughly tested three of the devices.

“The devices were inconsistent and unreliable in their performance,” they wrote in their report, commissioned by NHTSA and released on Monday.

“They often required adjusting of the position of the child within the child restraint, the distance to activation varied across trials and scenarios and they experienced continual synching/un-synching during use,” they added.

Sometimes a cell-phone interfered with the device, and spilled juice or milk could knock some out completely. “In sum, the devices require considerable effort from the parent/caregiver to ensure smooth operation and often that operation is not consistent,” Arbogast’s team concluded. “None directly address the root cause of the hot environment that led to the potential for heat stroke.”

Many relied on an alarm that was on the car’s key fob and that worried Arbogast. “What if my husband was taking the child and I forget to give him the key fob?” she asked.

“Most important, it should be noted that these devices which integrate into a child restraint would not be applicable in scenarios where the child is playing and gets locked in the vehicle (30 percent of fatalities) or in a scenario where the parent/caregiver intentionally leaves the child in the vehicle (17 percent of fatalities),” the report notes.

Parents have seen the reports of these tragedies and are looking for help to protect their child. “There has been a recent rise in demand for technologies to prevent these deaths by reminding the caregiver that the child is in the car, as about half of these children have inadvertently been forgotten,” the report reads.

Experts suggest that parents and caregivers “layer” their routine by adding steps to exiting the car. Put your purse or briefcase in the backseat as a reminder. You might even want to consider putting one shoe in the back seat, anything that will remind you to look at your child before you leave the car. 

Other suggestions parents or caregivers might want to try:

- Leave a large teddy bear in the front seat as a reminder.

- Setting an alarm on your cell phone to remind you to check for your child. Set it for about the time it usually takes to arrive where you are going.

- Having a routine with the child’s caregiver. “If it is well-established that when your child shows up in the morning, if they don’t show up within 10 minutes of that time the daycare provider calls you or sends a text,” Arbogast suggested.

Source: http://vitals.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/07/30/13033698-devices-cant-save-ba...(direct)|utmccn=(direct)|utmcmd=(none)&__utmv=238145375.|8=Earned%20By=msnbc%7Chealth=1^12=Landing%20Content=Mixed=1^13=Landing%20Hostname=www.msnbc.msn.com=1^30=Visit%20Type%20to%20Content=Earned%20to%20Mixed=1&__utmk=69486035

Your Baby

Radiation In Milk: Should Parents Worry?

2.00 to read

The radiation found is more than 5,000 times smaller than the level that would require any action from the FDA. “These types of findings are to be expected in the coming days, and are far below levels of public health concern, including for infants and children,” the agency said. One of the most nutritional supplements children, particularly babies and toddlers, receive almost daily is milk. Since news of the Japanese nuclear power plant explosions, some parents are asking – how safe is the milk I give my child?

According to the EPA, the FDA, and scientists who study radiation, the risk of dangerous radiation levels in the nation’s milk supply is small. Recent reports from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Food and Drug Administration say that very low levels of radiation have turned up in milk samples on the West coast. Traces of radioactive Iodine-131 were found in milk in California and Washington state. Federal and state authorities are monitoring for contamination as the nuclear crisis continues to unfold in Japan. The radiation found is more than 5,000 times smaller than the level that would require any action from the FDA. “These types of findings are to be expected in the coming days, and are far below levels of public health concern, including for infants and children,” the  agency said. Robert Henkin, professor emeritus of radiology at Loyola University’s Strich School of Medicine, agrees that the levels detected are nothing to be concerned about at this time. Henkin told National Public Radio’s Health Blog Shots "We are exposed to tons of natural radiation, the amount is a fraction of our yearly background exposure.” Even tainted Japanese milk, one sample of which reportedly had over 1,500 becquerels per liter (50,000 times the amount found in Washington), would only be dangerous if you drank 58,000 glasses. People are often exposed to low levels of radiation through common occurrences such as smoking, flying in airplanes, dental x-rays, mammograms and exposure to natural radiation from the soil. Though radioactive material spreading from the Japanese power plant reached the West Coast days ago, radiation levels detected so far are well below normal exposure. Also,  because iodine -131 has a short half-life of  8 days- this level is likely to rapidly decrease. Levels of iodine 131 entering the air can be very diluted, but if the iodine is deposited on grass eaten by cows, the cows will re-concentrate it in their milk by a factor of 1,000. This is mainly a concern with fresh milk, not for dairy products that are stored before consumption. Milk provides calcium for strong bones and teeth, and according to medical research, milk can improve the intake of minerals and vitamins. A glassful of milk contains vitamin A & B for good eyesight and increasing red blood cell count, carbohydrates for  energy, potassium for proper nerve function, magnesium for muscular function, phosphorous for energy release, protein for body repair and growth. The American Academy of Pediatrics advises that parents begin low fat milk after age two years. Before that age, toddlers should be either breastfeeding or drinking whole milk, but after age two you can start giving a child 2%, 1%, or skim milk. And of course they should be either breastfeeding or drinking an iron fortified infant formula before age 12 months.

Your Baby

Twitter Question from @GeenasMom

Jill writes:  Is it true that if a small child drinks too much milk it can deplete their body of iron?  I read that somewhere.

Dr. Sue says:  This true.  Too much milk can cause occult GI bleeding and loss of hemoglobin and subsequent anemia. While milk is great and wonderful for growing bones, you should limit a toddler’s intake to about 12 – 18 ounces per day. Thanks for the tweet!

Your Baby

Evenflo Recalls 1.3 Million Child Seat Buckles

1.45 read

Evenflo Company Inc. is voluntarily recalling 1.3 million convertible car seats and harnessed booster seats due to the risk that during an emergency a child may not be able to be removed quickly.

The buckles on the car seats and booster seats may become stuck in the locked position. The National Highway Transportation and Safety Administration (NHTSA) said the buckles used in the recall models were manufactured between 2011 and 2014.

Evenflo’s website states that “These select models use a harness crotch buckle which may become resistant to unlatching over time, due to exposure to various contaminants (like food and drinks) that are present in everyday use of the convertible car seat or harnessed booster by toddlers. This condition may make it difficult to remove a child from the vehicle. There is no such risk if the buckle is functioning normally. These convertible car seats and harnessed boosters meet all requirements for crashworthiness under the federal FMVSS 213 safety standard and can continue to be used to transport your child safely, if you are not experiencing difficulty unlatching the buckle. Importantly, Evenflo has received no reports of injuries to children in connection with the use of this buckle on the seats that are subject to this recall.”

The recall models include:  

  • Momentum – Model number prefix- 385
  • Chase - Model number prefix- 306, 329
  • Maestro – Model number prefix- 310
  • Symphony - Model number prefix-345, 346
  • Snugli All in One - Model number prefix- 345, 346
  • Titan - Model number prefix- 371
  • SureRide - Model number prefix- 371
  • Secure Kid & Snugli Booster - Model number prefix- 308

Evenflo is providing consumers a remedy kit, free-of-charge that includes a replacement buckle and instructions for installing the new buckle. The remedy kit is available by placing an order with Evenflo on their website at www.buckle.evenflo.com, or calling 1-800-490-7591.

Evenflo requests that consumers not return the convertible car seats or harnessed boosters to retailers.

The website also contains a link for instructions on cleaning the buckles.

The NHTSA is also investigating the safety of Evenflo’s rear-facing infant seats.

Source: http://www.mbtmag.com/news/2014/04/evenflo-recalling-13m-child-seat-buckles

http://safety.evenflo.com/cs/sc/cssc99_RD.phtml?rid=EFR36&src=WEB

Your Baby

No Link Between Vaccines and Autism

1.30 to read

A new study slated to appear in the Journal of Pediatrics, says that there is no association between the amount of vaccines a young child receives and autism. Some parents have worried that there may be a link and have opted out of having their child vaccinated or reduced the number of vaccines recommended.

The percentage of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has increased by 72% since 2007. Some experts believe that changes in the diagnostic criteria may account for some of the increase as well as better screening tools and rating scales.

According to a statement released from the journal, researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Abt Associates analyzed data from children with and without ASD.

Researchers examined each child's cumulative exposure to antigens, the substances in vaccines that cause the body's immune system to produce antibodies to fight disease, and the maximum number of antigens each child received in a single day of vaccination, the journal's statement said.

The antigen totals were the same for children with and without ASD, researchers found.

Scientists believe genetics play a fundamental role in the risk for a child developing autism (80-90%), but recent studies also suggests that the father’s age at the time of conception may also be a contributor by increasing risks for genetic mistakes in the sperm that could be passed along to offspring.

Parents have worried about a link between vaccines and autism for decades despite the growing body of scientific evidence disproving such an association.

Source: Luciana Lopez, http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/03/29/us-usa-health-autism-idUSBRE92S0GO20130329

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Don't let swimmer's ear keep your kids out of the water this summer