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Parenting

Winter at Home: Managing Dry Indoor Heat

1:45

Once winter starts settling in, the home furnaces are cranked on, followed by itchy skin, upset sinuses and cracked lips. What fun.

It’s also when the home is sealed tight, trying to prevent heat loss.

While some areas of the country are still experiencing warmer weather, many are feeling the effects of old man winter.

Dry winter air leeches moisture, leaving your family’s skin as dry and cracked as a salt flat and sinuses as parched as the Sahara in summer. Adults and kids may wake up with a bit of a bloody nose as well.

You also start noticing static electricity while brushing your hair or petting the family pet.  Clothes start acting funny as well, sticking to you like saran wrap. It’s literally shocking.

Here are a few tips to help you combat dry indoor air, preserve the moisture in your family’s skin and nasal passages, and avoid pet-induced static shocks this winter.

In the winter, the cold air that seeps into your home from the outside has a lower humidity -- meaning that it carries very little moisture. You crank up the heat inside your house, which adds warmth but doesn't increase the amount of moisture in the air.

Because wintertime humidity is so low, what little moisture that is around is quickly sucked up into the air. Moisture also evaporates from your body, leaving your skin, nose, and throat parched.

One way to combat all this dry air is using a humidifier. Running a humidifier in your home will add moisture to dry, heated air. The moist air will help keep your skin, mouth,  and nose lubricated, and helps prevent those nasty static shocks. Your goal is to aim for a comfortable home humidity level of between 30% and 50%. Don't crank up the humidifier higher than that, though, or you could develop another problem – mold, fungi, dust mites,  and other tiny critters. Make sure to keep your humidifier clean so that it doesn't send dust and germs spewing into your house.

Sinuses often take a beating during the winter. Cold, dry air pulls moisture from your mouth, and nose, leaving your nasal passages dried out and your throat dry. Dry nostrils are more likely to crack and give you a nosebleed.

Why do kids and adults get sick more often during the winter months? Because your nose needs gooey mucus to trap viruses and other icky invaders before they can get you sick, dry nostrils can also make you more vulnerable to colds, sinus infections, and the flu. That's especially a problem in winter, when bacteria and viruses can tend to linger longer in the dry air after someone coughs or sneezes.

When you turn up the thermostat in your home, your heating system kicks up clouds of dust, pollen, and other allergens that can inflame your sinuses. Cold, dry air plus those allergens can also irritate your airways. For some kids with asthma, cold and dry air can lead to a narrowing of breathing passages and trigger an attack.

One way to help add moisture back is by keeping hydrated. Keep your skin and mouth moist by drinking water throughout the day. Don’t like water? Try putting in a little tea or juice to add flavor. It’s a little easier to drink more water in the summer, because …well… you’re sweating more, triggering a thirst attack. It takes a little more effort in the winter to keep hydrated but the pay-off is just as valuable.

You may also find yours or little ones fingers developing cracks and dealing with dry itchy skin in the winter because cold air sucks out the skin’s moisture. While it’s tempting, taking hot showers can worsen dry, itchy skin by removing the natural layer of oil that preserves and protects the skin's moisture. Something we seem to have plenty of in the summer.

To help your skin out, shorten your shower time. Make sure that your child’s bath water or shower is warm, but not hot and he or she is using a gentle soap. Fifteen minutes should be the maximum time spent in the shower and even shorter if you’re clean sooner.

Alas, don’t forget to put a moisturizer on your child or have some available for your older kids. A thick oil-based moisturizer is best. The oil in the product will lock moisture into the skin and keep it from drying out. Moisturizers come in different forms, but ointments will provide the most protection for dry skin.  Make sure to apply moisturizing sunscreen with a minimum SPF 30 to exposed skin before going outside. Also apply a lip balm or petroleum jelly to protect against chapped lips. Help keep the nasal passageways moist by using saltwater (saline) drops or rubbing a little petroleum jelly into each nostril gently with a cotton swab.

There are some advantages to winter – you can dress in layers (you can only take so much off in the summer), walking is easier than when you’re dripping sweat and snow covered trees have a certain mystique and beauty to them. Other than that, winter is pretty brutal to our skin and nasal passages- but we can fight back by keeping hydrated, using creams to soften our skin and adding more moisture to the air while we hunker down; cozy and warm with our family indoors.

Story source: Lisa Bernstein, MD, http://www.webmd.com/women/home-health-and-safety-9/dry-indoor-air?page=2

Parenting

Labor Day Safety Tips!

2:30

Traditionally, Labor Day is the fond farewell to summer and a welcomed hello to autumn. Lots of people will be on the roads, having backyard or park reunions, grilling, swimming and basically enjoying family and friends get-togethers.

To make this Labor Day a safe one, here are some tips that can help keep you from having to make a trip to the ER on this special weekend:

Road Safety.

-       Before you start out on a trip, make sure that your vehicle is in good condition, and see that any necessary maintenance is performed.

-       Just as adults and kids should always wear a seat belt, infants should always be properly secured in car seats.  

-       Be sure to follow all traffic laws while on the road, and use extra caution while driving in construction zones.

-       Be vigilant about paying attention to the road, and avoid distractions such as cell phones. Even just a momentary look away from the road can drastically increase your chances of a crash.

-       Be mindful of other vehicles on the road and remember to keep a safe distance between your vehicle and others. Keep in mind that semi-trucks, for example, require more time to come to a stop than cars do, and have large blind spots.

-       Keep an eye out for motorcyclists. Motorcycles are more difficult to see because they are smaller and can swiftly move in and out of traffic.

-       Even though you may have GPS, keep a map in the car and road flares in the trunk.

Food Safety. Picnics, barbeques, and neighborhood potlucks are plentiful and that means so is the chance of food-borne illness. To minimize the chance of cross-contamination:

-       Wash your hands before and after you touch raw meat.

-       Dry your hands on paper towels instead of cloth towels, and discard immediately. Refrigerate meat that’s waiting to hit the grill.

-       Never leave food that requires refrigeration (think potato salad, coleslaw or chicken salad) out in the sun. Instead, set the item the bowl is in on top of a pan filled with ice, and serve from a shaded area.

-       Return the item to the refrigerator as soon as guests have been served.

Boat Safety. Lots of folks will be heading to the lake for a family and/or friends boating adventure over the Labor Day weekend. Make it a safe one with these suggestions:

-       Have your boat in good mechanical condition and have all safety equipment on board such as personal flotation devices, an emergency kit and a first aid kit.

-       Stay away from restricted areas.

-       Make sure someone on land knows when you leave, about what time you’re expecting to return, where you’re headed and who all is on board.

-       Take a fully charged cell phone with you.

-       Everyone should have a life-vest on, including infants.

-       Maintain safe speeds and keep a lookout for hidden objects below the waterline

-       Maintain a 50-foot distance from other boats, swimmers, docks and the shore unless operating at an idle speed.

-       Install a marine-grade CO detector in your boat

-       Keep a flashlight and fresh batteries available.

-       Choose a designated driver before launching. Passengers that drink alcohol should drink in moderation.

-       Have plenty of water on board to avoid dehydration.

Pool and Water Safety. Pools and lakes are another place you’ll find plenty of people this Labor Day. That means lots of children will be in the water as well. It’s always best if someone knows CPR, if you don’t know it now – make a point of the family taking CPR classes together soon.

-       Appoint a “designated watcher” to monitor children during social gatherings at or near pools or water.

-       Have a fully charged cell phone with you. Call 911 immediately if a child is found unconscious in water.

-       Keep rescue equipment poolside or with you at the lake. Don’t wait for the paramedics to arrive because you will lose valuable life-saving seconds. Four to six minutes without oxygen can cause permanent brain damage or death.

-       Have a first-aid kit close by.

-       Maintain constant visual contact with children in a pool or lake or near a pool or lake. If a child is missing, check the water first; seconds count in preventing death or disability.

-       Never use flotation devices as a substitute for supervision. 

-       Don’t assume you’ll hear a child who’s in trouble in the water; child drowning is a silent death, with no splashing to alert anyone that the child is in trouble.

-       At public pools, use one that has a lifeguard. While not a substitute for parental or caretaker supervision, the more eyes available, the better.

Whether you’re splashing in a pool, enjoying the ultimate picnic or enjoying a ride on a boat, we want you to stay safe this Labor Day weekend. Remember: An accident is never planned. But keeping out safety tips in mind may help prevent one.

Story sources: http://www.cooneyconway.com/blog/road-safety-labor-day-weekend

https://www.safewise.com/blog/7-safety-tips-for-an-injury-free-labor-day/

http://www.nationalwatersafetymonth.org/water-safety-tips

Parenting

Any Benefits From Eating Your Own Placenta?

2:00

Here’s a medical study I never thought I’d read –“Are there health benefits associated with eating your own placenta after giving birth”?

Well…no, according to a research team from Northwestern University in Chicago. In fact, there may be a few health risks associated with ingesting placenta.

As I read the study’s findings, I began to wonder; who thought this was a good idea in the first place?

It turns out that throughout history there have been some cultures in which women ate the placenta after giving birth. It’s called placentophagy.

Some animals are known to also eat their afterbirth.

Apparently its’ also become the thing among a few celebrity mothers. While some believe that fresh placenta provides the most benefits, others elect to make a smoothie or have it dried, processed and made into pills.

However, the question still remains – is there any real benefit from eating placenta whether it’s raw, processed, made into a smoothie or pill, grilled or baked?

Scientists from Northwestern University pored over accumulated research that has been done on the topic.  The bottom line is that they could not find any evidence that there are any health benefits to placentophagy and that there may be unknown risks to mothers and their infants.

"Our sense is that women choosing placentophagy, who may otherwise be very careful about what they are putting into their bodies during pregnancy and nursing, are willing to ingest something without evidence of its benefits and, more importantly, of its potential risks to themselves and their nursing infants," study lead author and psychologist Cynthia Coyle said in a Northwestern news release.

In the study, Coyle's team reviewed data from 10 published studies. They found no data to support that eating the placenta -- either raw, cooked or in pill form -- protects against postpartum depression, reduces pain after childbirth, increases a woman's energy, helps with lactation, improves mother-child bonding, replenishes iron in the body, or improves skin elasticity. All touted as reasons many of the celebrity moms chose to give it a try.

The researchers also said that there are no studies examining the risks associated with eating the placenta, which acts as a filter to absorb and protect fetuses from toxins and pollutants.

Coyle noted that "there are no regulations as to how the placenta is stored and prepared, and the dosing is inconsistent. Women really don't know what they are ingesting."

If placentophagy appeals to you, be sure and check with your hospital or birthing center first. Many hospitals dispose of the placenta as bio-hazardous waste along with the other medical waste that occurs during birth (needles, blood, gloves etc.). You’ll most likely have to make arrangements ahead of time or find a more accommodating provider.

Source: Robert Preidt, http://www.webmd.com/baby/news/20150604/new-moms-gain-no-benefit-from-eating-placenta-studies-show

Parenting

Kids Benefit With Older Moms

2:00

Many women are waiting till they are older to have their first child, but their offspring may be the one that reaps the most benefit, according to a new study from Denmark.

Older mothers are less likely to scold or punish their young children, and those children tend to have fewer behavioral, social and emotional problems, the study suggests.

According to researchers from Aarhus University in Denmark, older moms tend to have more stable relationships, are more educated, and have more wealth and resources.

"We know that people become more mentally flexible with age, are more tolerant of other people and thrive better emotionally themselves," researcher Dion Sommer said in a university news release.

One theory as to why older mothers may make better parents is that they tend to be more psychologically mature.

Sommer noted, “that may explain why older mothers do not scold and physically discipline their children as much."

This type of upbringing may contribute to a more positive environment to grow up in.

In the study, the investigators looked at data from a random sample of just over 4,700 Danish mothers.

Among their findings: older moms generally resorted less to verbal and physical punishment than younger moms did — though those findings did get a little wobbly at the 15-year point.

The children of older mothers also had fewer behavioral, social and emotional problems than kids of younger mothers, at least at the 7- and 11-year-old points, while adolescence again seemed to muddy things up. The study controlled for factors like income and education, and attributed the results mostly to the greater patience and steadiness that comes to adults as they age.

Other studies, pointed out in a TIME Health article, have shown benefits for older moms, including:

Older moms live longer: react-text: 234 According to a 2016 study, of 28,000 U.S. women, those who had their first child after age 25 were 11% likelier to live to age 90 than those who became mothers younger. A 2014 study took this even further, finding that women who gave birth after age 33 were 50% likelier to live to age 95 than women who had their last child when they were 29 or younger. One caveat — and it’s a big one: the cause-and-effect still has not been determined, so it’s possible the older moms were simply healthier to begin with.

Their kids are taller and smarter. According to a 2016 study published in Population and Development Review. The investigators surveyed 1.5 million men and women in Sweden and found that those born to older mothers were more physically fit, had better grades when they were in school and had at least a small height advantage over people born to younger mothers. Again, causation was uncertain, allowing for the possibility that mothers who started off healthier and were able to have kids later may have simply passed those robust genes onto their children. Demographics — especially regarding income and education — may have also been at work. Wealthier moms with higher power jobs are likelier to have the financial flexibility to delay childbearing, bringing them into the cohort of older moms. More money can also mean better nutrition. Still, 1.5 million is an impressive sample group.

Older moms have more energy than you’d think: A study of mothers who had babies via egg donation after age 50 — well and truly beyond the point at which most women consider conceiving — found that they had levels of energy and physical function similar to women who had babies in their 30s and 40s.

So there you have it, women who are considering waiting a little while to start a family can do as well or better than younger women raising children, depending on their general health and outlook.

Many experts advise women not to wait too long to have children, due to declining fertility and increased risk of problems such as miscarriage, preterm birth and birth defects.

"However, when estimating the consequences of the rising maternal age, it's important to consider both the physical and psychosocial pros and cons," Sommer said.

The Denmark study was published recently in the European Journal of Developmental Psychology.

Story sources: Robert Preidt, HealthDay reporter, http://www.webmd.com/parenting/news/20170323/older-mothers-may-raise-better-behaved-kids-study-suggests

Jeffrey Kluger, http://time.com/4709403/older-mother-benefits/

 

Parenting

Cradle and Bassinet Safety Tips

1:45

Cradles and bassinets can be convenient for parents and comfortable for babies. You can move them easily from room to room, letting you keep an eye on baby during the day. At night, you can keep your baby in your own bedroom during the first few weeks of life as you and baby adjust to a new sleeping schedule.

In recent years, cradles and bassinets have gained new features: You can buy ones that vibrate, are on wheels, swivel from side to side, or nestle next to your bed for co-sleeping without bed-sharing. They’re also great for trips to see the grandparents.

While they are handy, cradles and bassinets are not substitutes for a crib. Babies outgrow them, so you’ll need a crib sooner or later, but they can be useful.

Just like cribs, there are important safety tips to be aware of when using cradles and bassinets:

  • Avoid bassinets and cradles with a motion or rocking feature, as these have caused suffocation when babies rolled against the edge. If you use an heirloom-rocking cradle, supervise your infant while in use.
  • As with a crib, a bassinet, cradle, sleeper or play yard should have a firm mattress that fits snugly without any space around the edges so a baby’s head can’t get wedged in and lead to suffocation. The American Academy of Pediatrics has not yet weighed in on the safety of these products; some pediatricians have warned parents that they are not safe for overnight sleeping. Parents should err on the side of caution and use only products that comply with safe-sleep recommendations.
  • If you have pets or other young children in the house – for instance, a dog who might knock over a bassinet, a cat who might climb in, or a toddler who might try to lift your baby from a bassinet – stick with a crib.
  • Moses baskets - a woven basket with handles - are often lined with puffy fabric, which raises a baby's risk for suffocation or sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and are best avoided.

Bassinets and cradles are designed for babies under 5 months old, and who cannot push up on hands and knees.

These temporary products can be helpful for keeping an eye on your baby while they are napping, if you need to move from room to room or stay overnight in another home. Parents and caregivers need to make sure any cradle or bassinet used meets current CPSIA safety standards.

Story sources: https://www.babycenter.com/bassinets-baskets

 

Parenting

Calming Kid’s Pre-Surgery Anxiety: iPads or Drugs?

1:00

Once you think about it, it makes a lot of sense; a new study shows that iPads work as well as sedative drugs to calm anxious kids before surgery.

Researchers assessed 112 children between 4 and 10 years old in France who had day surgery requiring general anesthesia. Twenty minutes before receiving the anesthesia, 54 kids were given the sedative midazolam and 58 were handed an iPad to distract them.

Guess what they found. The anxiety level for both groups was about the same. However, iPads conferred none of the side effects of sedatives, the researchers said. Also, they said the kids given iPads were easier to anesthetize.

"Our study showed that child and parental anxiety before anesthesia are equally blunted by midazolam or use of the iPad," said Dr. Dominique Chassard and colleagues at Hospital Femme-Mere-Enfant in Bron, France. "However, the quality of induction of anesthesia, as well as parental satisfaction, were judged better in the iPad group."

As any parent knows, iPads and other tablets offer an endless amount of entertainment to help children relax. From music to cartoons to games, there are plenty of programs available to take a child’s mind off of the current situation.  It’s not surprising they would work to help alleviate anxiety before something as scary as surgery. 

The study was to be presented this week at the World Congress of Anesthesiologists meeting in Hong Kong. Researched presented at medical meetings is considered preliminary.

Story source: Robert Preidt, http://www.webmd.com/parenting/news/20160830/ipads-calm-surgery-bound-kids-as-well-as-sedatives

 

Parenting

Cashews Recalled Due to Glass Pieces

1:30

Nuts have become a go-to snack for many families looking to live a healthier life. If you’ve purchased cashews from an ALDI grocery store recently, be sure to check and see if the brand is Southern Grove Cashew Halves and Pieces with Sea Salt.

The recall was initiated after the company received consumer reports of glass found in the product. To date, there have not been any reported injuries. Potentially impacted product has been removed from store shelves.

This recall affects the Southern Grove Cashew Halves and Pieces with Sea Salt sold in 8-ounce (227-gram) canisters, labeled with UPC No. 041498179366. The affected cashews have best by dates of 11/27/18 and 11/28/18.

The cashews were sold by ALDI stores in 29 states: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Washington, D.C., West Virginia, and Wisconsin.

Consumers who have purchased the product in question are urged not to consume this product and may return the product to their local ALDI store for a refund or dispose of the item.

Consumers with questions may contact Star Snacks at 201-882-4593 or RecallFEQ01@gmail.com, Monday-Friday 9 am – 2 pm EST.

Story source: https://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm562129.htm

Parenting

What Do Kids Need to Succeed in School?

2:00

Does poverty impact a child’s ability to do well in school? Possibly says a new study, but parenting skills play a more important role.

Child development experts say that there are lots of things parents can do to help their young child grow into a successful adult. This study examines the importance of parents, especially those in the low-income bracket, having high educational expectations for their child as well as reading to them and providing computer access and training.

The path to success begins before your child heads off to kindergarten. These findings point to the importance of doing more to prepare children for kindergarten, said study co-author Dr. Neal Halfon, director of the Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities at the University of California, Los Angeles.

"The good news is that there are some kids doing really well," he said. "And there are a lot of seemingly disadvantaged kids who achieve much beyond what might be predicted for them because they have parents who are managing to provide them what they need."

The researchers wanted to examine what it takes to help a child succeed in school. The team began by examining statistics to better understand the role of factors like poverty. "We didn't want to just look at poor kids versus rich kids, or poor versus all others," Halfon said.

Conventional thought is that "you'll do better if you get read to more, you go to preschool more, you have more regular routines and you have more-educated parents," Halfon added.

Researchers examined results of a study of 6,000 U.S. English and Spanish- speaking children who were born in 2001. The kids took math and reading tests when they entered kindergarten, and their parents answered survey questions. The investigators then adjusted the results so they wouldn't be thrown off by high or low numbers of certain types of kids.

Parental expectations played a role in how the children’s future scholastic goals were perceived. For example, only 57 percent of parents of kids who scored the worst expected their child to attend college, compared to 96 percent of parents of children who scored the highest.

The results showed that children who attended preschool scored higher on the tests than children who didn’t. Computer use at home was also more common for the higher scorers -- 84 percent compared to 27 percent. Parents also read more to the kids who scored the best, the findings showed.

Halfon noted that the parent’s own attitude about preschool had a big impact on whether their child attended or not.

Karen Smith, a pediatric psychologist with the University of Texas Medical Branch, praised the study and said it points to the importance of helping poorer parents develop parenting skills and start believing they can really support their children.

"Parents from more affluent families know what to do when it comes to reading to their kids, probably because they've been read to," Smith said. Poorer parents "may not even have the money for books, and maybe they weren't read to themselves."

The study points out that preschool attendance is crucial for helping children develop better learning skills, however, it’s not the only factor that plays an important role.

Smith and Halfon agreed that it's crucial to teach poorer parents how to be better at parenting. Still, Halfon said, "there's no single one magic bullet that's going to solve the problem," not even widening access to preschool. "That's necessary," he said, "but it's probably not sufficient."

Parents that make their child’s education an important part of their childrearing help their children succeed most. Reading to children is a key part of developing a child’s attitude towards studying and expression.  A child that is excited to learn new words and is able to understand the flow of a story learns how to express their own ideas better with less frustration. New challenges aren’t as daunting.

Computer use is essential in this day and age. Libraries can provide access to computers for families that cannot afford to buy one. It takes time and commitment and when money is scarce it’s often twice as difficult, but it can make an enormous difference in a child’s ability to keep up with changing technology as well opening up a new world of opportunities.

Children rely solely on their parent’s guidance and this study points out how much that guidance can change the course of their little one’s lives.

The study is online and comes out in print in the February issue of the journal Pediatrics.

Source: Randy Dotinga, http://consumer.healthday.com/kids-health-information-23/child-development-news-124/family-income-expectations-key-to-kindergarten-performance-695515.html

 

Parenting

Vegetarian Diet Is Good For the Whole Family

1:456

Has your teen or little one brought up the idea of going vegetarian? In the current age of online videos and social media groups, a lot of kids are seeing and learning about animal product processing and are experimenting with the idea of changing what they eat. While it may seem like a silly idea at first, you might want to give it further consideration.

For years, some people have thought that vegetarian and vegan diets may not be healthy enough for children.

A new study published by the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND), says not to worry, vegetarian and vegan diets can be safe and healthy for people of any age.

In fact, several studies show that vegetarians generally have lower risks of obesity and chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease and certain cancers, according to the AND. That includes vegans -- who avoid not only meat and fish, but also all animal products, including dairy.

"No one should doubt that vegetarian diets are safe at all life stages, including infancy, childhood and adolescence," says Susan Levin, one of the report authors and director of nutrition education at the nonprofit Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine in Washington, D.C.

Levin also noted that studies show children on vegetarian diets eat more fruits and vegetables, and fewer sweets and salty snack foods. They're also less likely to be overweight or obese.

The academy also noted that vegetarian and vegan diets can be safe during pregnancy and lactation. These diets can also be fine for athletes and the elderly, the report said.

While all this information sounds promising, what you include in your vegetarian diet is the key to staying healthy. If you subsist on white rice, Levin pointed out, that might be technically vegetarian, but not nutritious.

So it's important to eat a variety of foods, including a range of whole grains, beans, fruits and vegetables, and nuts and seeds.

Vegetarians and vegan diets do lack one important nutrient found in animal products– vitamin B-12.

According to the AND report, vegans should take supplemental vitamin B12. Vegetarians usually need supplements or B12-fortified foods, too, the group said -- since their dairy intake may not supply enough of the nutrient.

But, Levin said, B12 is the only supplement vegans need. They can get all of their other nutrient needs from food.

Getting enough protein, calcium and iron has been another concern about vegetarian diets and particularly vegan diets. That shouldn’t be a problem, Levin says, as long as you make wise food choices.

The report noted, it's imperative to make wise food choices: Calcium from vegetables like kale, turnip greens and bok-choy is much better absorbed than calcium from high-oxalate vegetables such as spinach and Swiss chard, for example.

As for the potential health benefits, studies have found that vegetarians and vegans tend to weigh less and have lower cholesterol levels than omnivores do. They also tend to have lower risks of high blood pressure, heart disease, type 2 diabetes and certain cancers, such as cancers of the prostate and gastrointestinal tract.

"If there were a pill that did all of that," Levin said, "everyone would be taking it."

Lots of families aren’t necessarily willing to give up all animal products, but would like to cut down on their meat consumption. Vegetarian and vegan recipes can help fill the void on meatless lunch and dinners while offering a nutritious substitute.

The AND report also notes that vegetarian diets are kinder to the environment.

It takes far fewer resources -- land, water, fuel and fertilizer -- to produce a pound of kidney beans than a pound of beef, for example.

"Vegetarian diets leave a lighter carbon footprint," said Levin.

The ADA suggests that families interested in going completely vegetarian or vegan should seek assistance from a registered dietician to help them learn about the various sources of protein and other vital nutrients. Vegetarian cookbooks and classes are also available for families thinking of making a dietary switch. There are also very good informational resources online.

Story source: Amy Norton, https://consumer.healthday.com/vitamins-and-nutrition-information-27/food-and-nutrition-news-316/vegetarian-diets-benefit-people-and-the-planet-717307.html

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