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Parenting

The Dos and Don’ts of Cleaning Your Child’s Ears

2:00

True story. When I was a child, my mother was somewhat obsessed about earwax; specifically, she did not like to see earwax in my ears. Ever.

In order to make sure that my ears were clear of any nasty wax, she would use a bobby pin (remember those?) and gently insert it down into my ear and scape out any brownish gooey stuff. That would be followed up with a Q-Tip to make sure all substances were gone. It didn’t take many accidental pokes to get me to sit as still as possible.

I don’t know if there is any connection, but I have tinnitus and have had it for years.

Don’t ever stick anything into your child’s ear. That’s not just my opinion; it’s a warning from The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. The ear, nose and throat organization recently released new guidelines for the public.

It’s perfectly all right to wipe the outside of the ear with a washcloth. But it's important to not use a cotton swab, a finger, or anything else (such as a bobby pin!) to poke inside the ear because of the risk of damaging the delicate ear canal and eardrum, or packing the wax in even further, which could cause infection.

What is earwax and why do we have it? Earwax is made in the outer ear canal, the area between the fleshy part of the ear on the outside of the head and the middle ear. The medical term for earwax is Cerumen.

Earwax has many important functions. It helps protect the eardrum and ear canal by providing a waterproof lining for the ear canal, helping to keep it dry and preventing germs from causing infection. It also traps dirt, dust, and other particles, keeping them from injuring or irritating the eardrum.

In most cases, nothing needs to be done to remove earwax from kids' ears; regular bathing is enough to keep it at healthy levels.

If earwax ever does need to be removed, let a doctor do it. There are only a few reasons earwax should be removed; it’s causing pain or discomfort, or hearing loss. That’s about it.

The academy’s updated list consists of what to do and what to avoid when it comes to dealing with earwax:

DON’T over-clean your ears. It may irritate the ear canal, cause infection, and even increase impacted wax.

DON’T put anything smaller than your elbow in your ear. Cotton swabs, hair pins, car keys, toothpicks — all can cause injury to the delicate ear canal, including a cut, perforation of the eardrum, or a dislocation of the tiny bones in the ear that enable hearing. Injury can lead to hearing loss, dizziness, ringing in the ear and other problems.

DON’T use ear candles. “Candling” is an alternative health fad purported to help with everything from earwax to cancer, but doctors say there is no evidence to back up any of those claims. Candling does not remove impacted earwax, and it can cause serious damage to the ear canal and eardrum.

DO seek medical help if you have symptoms of hearing loss, ear fullness and ear pain.

DO ask your doctor about home remedies for treating earwax impaction. But first, be sure you don’t have a medical or ear condition that could make some options unsafe.

DO seek medical attention if you experience ear pain, drainage, bleeding, hearing changes, an odor coming from the ear or other noticeable change.

There are safe home remedies to use that will clean earwax out, but talk with your pediatrician first to make sure the remedy is appropriate for your little one.

When a physician removes earwax, it’s typically done in the exam room. There might be a little discomfort but it isn't painful, though some kids may be uncomfortable with the sensation of someone handling their ears.

In rare cases where a child can't sit still or cooperate with the doctor, the procedure will be done in an operating room with the child given general anesthesia.

Doctors use a variety of different tools to remove earwax, including a tiny device with a curve at the end (called a curette), graspers, and suction, as well as an otoscope (a handheld tool with a light, used in regular checkups to see far into the ear canal). Removal takes just a few minutes and usually doesn't require any further treatment.

If there's a sign of infection, the doctor may prescribe antibiotic eardrops. But further home treatment usually isn't needed after most removals.

Dr. Seth Schwartz, chair of the guideline update group, said the strangest thing he’s seen someone stick in a waxy ear: a Barbie doll shoe. That definitely tops my mother’s bobby pins.

Remember, kids watch everything you do. If they see a parent or guardian putting something in their ear, they are more likely to put something in theirs too. That something could cause permanent damage. 

Story sources: Mary Brophy Marcus, http://www.cbsnews.com/news/earwax-removal-dos-and-donts/

Patrick Barth, MD, http://kidshealth.org/en/parents/earwhttp://kidshealth.org/en/parents/earwax.html#

Parenting

Vegetarian Diet Is Good For the Whole Family

1:456

Has your teen or little one brought up the idea of going vegetarian? In the current age of online videos and social media groups, a lot of kids are seeing and learning about animal product processing and are experimenting with the idea of changing what they eat. While it may seem like a silly idea at first, you might want to give it further consideration.

For years, some people have thought that vegetarian and vegan diets may not be healthy enough for children.

A new study published by the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND), says not to worry, vegetarian and vegan diets can be safe and healthy for people of any age.

In fact, several studies show that vegetarians generally have lower risks of obesity and chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease and certain cancers, according to the AND. That includes vegans -- who avoid not only meat and fish, but also all animal products, including dairy.

"No one should doubt that vegetarian diets are safe at all life stages, including infancy, childhood and adolescence," says Susan Levin, one of the report authors and director of nutrition education at the nonprofit Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine in Washington, D.C.

Levin also noted that studies show children on vegetarian diets eat more fruits and vegetables, and fewer sweets and salty snack foods. They're also less likely to be overweight or obese.

The academy also noted that vegetarian and vegan diets can be safe during pregnancy and lactation. These diets can also be fine for athletes and the elderly, the report said.

While all this information sounds promising, what you include in your vegetarian diet is the key to staying healthy. If you subsist on white rice, Levin pointed out, that might be technically vegetarian, but not nutritious.

So it's important to eat a variety of foods, including a range of whole grains, beans, fruits and vegetables, and nuts and seeds.

Vegetarians and vegan diets do lack one important nutrient found in animal products– vitamin B-12.

According to the AND report, vegans should take supplemental vitamin B12. Vegetarians usually need supplements or B12-fortified foods, too, the group said -- since their dairy intake may not supply enough of the nutrient.

But, Levin said, B12 is the only supplement vegans need. They can get all of their other nutrient needs from food.

Getting enough protein, calcium and iron has been another concern about vegetarian diets and particularly vegan diets. That shouldn’t be a problem, Levin says, as long as you make wise food choices.

The report noted, it's imperative to make wise food choices: Calcium from vegetables like kale, turnip greens and bok-choy is much better absorbed than calcium from high-oxalate vegetables such as spinach and Swiss chard, for example.

As for the potential health benefits, studies have found that vegetarians and vegans tend to weigh less and have lower cholesterol levels than omnivores do. They also tend to have lower risks of high blood pressure, heart disease, type 2 diabetes and certain cancers, such as cancers of the prostate and gastrointestinal tract.

"If there were a pill that did all of that," Levin said, "everyone would be taking it."

Lots of families aren’t necessarily willing to give up all animal products, but would like to cut down on their meat consumption. Vegetarian and vegan recipes can help fill the void on meatless lunch and dinners while offering a nutritious substitute.

The AND report also notes that vegetarian diets are kinder to the environment.

It takes far fewer resources -- land, water, fuel and fertilizer -- to produce a pound of kidney beans than a pound of beef, for example.

"Vegetarian diets leave a lighter carbon footprint," said Levin.

The ADA suggests that families interested in going completely vegetarian or vegan should seek assistance from a registered dietician to help them learn about the various sources of protein and other vital nutrients. Vegetarian cookbooks and classes are also available for families thinking of making a dietary switch. There are also very good informational resources online.

Story source: Amy Norton, https://consumer.healthday.com/vitamins-and-nutrition-information-27/food-and-nutrition-news-316/vegetarian-diets-benefit-people-and-the-planet-717307.html

Parenting

Mumps Reach 10 Year High; Hitting Colleges and Kids Hard

1:45

Mumps are making a comeback, particularly on college campuses and in daycare centers.

A recent U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report shows that mumps are at a 10-year high. As of November, 45 states and the District of Columbia had reported a total of 2,879 mumps infections — more than double the mumps cases reported in 2015.

Mumps is a contagious disease caused by a virus. Common symptoms can include swollen glands in front of and below the ear or under the jaw, pain with opening and closing the jaw, fever, fatigue and malaise, headache and earache.

Currently, college campuses are taking the brunt of the mumps outbreak.

Dr. Michael Grosso, medical director and CMO of Huntington Hospital/Northwell Health, said close quarters such as dormitory living, can make it easier to pick up the virus.

“It’s spread through respiratory secretions, coughing, sneezing, close contact and sharing the same cups and utensils,” Grosso told CBS News.

Some colleges, such as The University of Missouri’s Columbia, are asking students to restrict their social activities and to make sure they get immunized. Typically, two doses of vaccine are recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the CDC, but the school is asking students to get a third measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine “based on discussions with public health officials and consistent with guidance from The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.”

College students aren’t the only ones being hit hard by mumps; younger children are also experiencing a rise in reported cases. More parents have opted-out of getting their children the MMR vaccine - putting non-immunized children at a higher risk.

Daycare centers are similar to college dormitories in that they provide an environment where a virus can be easily spread.

While most mumps cases are mild, albeit, uncomfortable, others can be more serious.

“Most individuals recover uneventfully from mumps, however as many as 10 percent of males who get mumps will get an inflammation of the testes which can lead to permanent sterility,” Grosso said.

The brain can also be affected. About 1 percent of people who come down with the mumps get serious brain infections and can experience meningitis, encephalitis and deafness associated with a brain infection.

“That small risk was behind the original impetus to create a vaccine,” Grosso said.

 Physicians are urging students to get the immunizations and to practice good hygiene. Simple steps such as covering your cough or sneeze, washing your hands with soap and water or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer, avoiding sharing food, drinks, cups or utensils can help prevent the spread of viruses.

Vaccines are still the most effective way to lower your risk of getting the mumps.  No vaccine is a 100 percent protective, Grosso notes, but it can help you avoid the risk of serious illness and lifelong health issues.

“Receiving two doses of mumps vaccines is said to confer about an 88 percent reduction in risk of getting mumps if you’re exposed,” said Grosso. A third dose may increase those odds.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the first dose of MMR vaccine should be administered between 12 and 15 months of age, and the second dose between 4 to 6 years of age.

Grosso emphasizes that parents need to get their children vaccinated early.

“Being immunized late is better than not being immunized ever. But being immunized late is not nearly as good as being immunized on time,” Grosso said.

Story sources: Mary Brophy Marcus, http://www.cbsnews.com/news/mumps-cases-10-year-high-college-outbreaks-vaccination/

https://www.cdc.gov/mumps/

Parenting

Recall: 8 million Cuisinart Food Processors

1:30

Food processors are used in millions of American homes to prepare family meals. One popular brand, Cuisinart, is recalling about 8 million of its food processors due to mouth lacerations and tooth breakage.

The food processor’s riveted blade can crack over time and small metal pieces of the blade can break off into the processed food.

This recall involves the riveted blades in Cuisinart food processors with model numbers that begin with the following:  CFP-9, CFP-11, DFP-7, DFP-11, DFP-14,  DLC-5, DLC-7, DLC-8, DLC-10, DLC-XP, DLC-2007, DLC-2009, DLC-2011, DLC-2014, DLC-3011, DLC-3014, EV-7, EV-10, EV-11, EV-14, KFP-7 and MP-14.

The model number is located on the bottom of the food processor. The blades have four rivets and are silver-colored stainless steel and have a beige plastic center hub. Only food processors with four rivets in the blades are included in this recall. Cuisinart is printed on the front and on the bottom of the food processors.

Conair, the management group for Cuisinart, has received 69 reports of consumers finding broken pieces of the blade in processed food, including 30 reports of mouth lacerations or tooth injuries.

Consumers should immediately stop using the food processor’s riveted blade and contact Cuisinart for a free replacement blade.

The food processors were sold at department, gourmet and specialty stores nationwide and on various websites from July 1996 through December 2015 for between $100 and $350.

Consumers can contact Cuisinart toll-free at 877-339-2534 from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. ET Monday through Friday and from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Saturday and Sunday or online at  www.cuisinart.com and click on Product Recalls at the bottom of the page for more information on the voluntary recall.

Story source: https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2017/Cuisinart-Food-Processors-Recalled-by-Conair

 

Parenting

Pregnancy May Actually Modify a Mom’s Brain

Baby, motherhood, health

Moms often feel like they have a “sixth sense” when it comes to their newborn’s needs and survival. What they may really be experiencing are the physical changes that pregnancy can have on the brain.

Researchers in Spain wanted to know if pregnancy could actually change the structure of a woman’s brain, impacting how she reacts to her newborn. What they found was that long-term changes to the brain do occur and that they may have evolved over time to improve a mother’s ability to protect and nurture her child.

The researchers used information gathered from MRI scans that compared the brain structures of 25 women before and after their first pregnancies.

After giving birth, the women had significant reductions of gray matter in areas of the brain associated with social interactions, the findings showed. Those brain regions overlapped with ones that activated when mothers watched images of their own babies.

“The changes concern brain areas associated with functions necessary to manage the challenges of motherhood," study co-lead author Erika Barba said in a news release from the Autonomous University of Barcelona.

Some women feel like they have trouble remembering things during and after their pregnancy, sometimes referred to as having “baby brain.” The good news is that researchers reported the participants had no changes in memory or other thinking functions during pregnancy. That means the loss of gray matter does not lead to problems in those areas. The brain changes, which lasted for at least two years after the women gave birth, probably help them adapt to motherhood, the study authors suggested.

According to study co-director Oscar Vilarroya: "The findings point to an adaptive process related to the benefits of better detecting the needs of the child, such as identifying the newborn's emotional state. Moreover, they provide primary clues regarding the neural basis of motherhood, perinatal mental health and brain plasticity in general."

Researchers also found that they were able to use the brain changes to predict a mother’s attachment to her baby. The changes were similar whether women got pregnant naturally or through fertility treatments.

This is the first research to show that pregnancy involves long-lasting changes -- at least for two years postpartum.

The term “mama bear” has often been used to describe the fierceness that some mothers’ exhibit when they feel their child is in danger or has been wronged. Now science may have found out why that is.

The study was published in the journal Nature Neuroscience.

Story source: Robert Preidt, http://www.webmd.com/baby/news/20161219/pregnancy-may-spur-mothering-changes-in-a-womans-brain

Parenting

New Year Family Resolutions!

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It’s the start of a brand new year and many of us will be evaluating our physical and mental health, goals and habits to see where we can make improvements. New Year’s resolutions always start off hopeful, but for many of us, fade away as day to day activities send us back on the treadmill of life.

However, it doesn’t have to be that way and when you share resolutions with someone else, there’s always that personal reminder that goals were set for a reason.

That’s why making resolutions, not as individuals, but as a family can keep hope alive.  Begin by making family resolutions a tradition that starts at the beginning of the year and has checks and balances throughout the year.  At the end of the year, see how everyone did and what could be done to make the next year even better.

Resolution: a decision to do or not do something. That’s about the clearest definition I’ve seen. Decisions are important – one decision may not always be the complete journey, but it’s a beginning. Without beginnings, nothing changes.

The best way to teach your children the importance of New Year’s resolutions is by making it a family tradition.

Dr. Benjamin Siegel, professor of pediatrics and psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine, suggests saying, “Each one of us is going to state a few things that we want to continue to do and things we’d like to change that would make us feel better about ourselves and how our family works.”

Each family member gets a chance to share something they are proud of and something they would like to change. Depending on the age of your children, it may help if one or both parents go first. If your child is old enough to write, have he or she write down their accomplishments and goals. If they cannot write yet, you can write for them. Copy down exactly what they are saying without trying to “improve” the grammar or goal.

Ideas for families can include group activities as well as individual undertakings. Resolutions for the entire family might include taking a monthly hike, playing board games twice a month or committing to more volunteering activities. Try to limit the number so they are more doable and more meaningful. “A list of 100 things is impossible,” Siegel says. “It should be based on things that are doable without economic hardship.”

Post your list in a place where the family will see it on an ongoing basis such as on the refrigerator or a bulletin board in the kitchen. Dr. Kathleen Clarke-Pearson, a clinical assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, suggests making a resolution box, in which each family member can drop in his or her resolutions, and then pull them out at a later date to review them.

What your child needs to work on depends on your child. If you are concerned about his diet, then encourage healthier eating habits for him as well as the whole family. If your daughter’s room is a mess, try to help her commit 10 minutes a day to cleaning it. As your child ages, he can be more active in coming up with goals, which will mean more to him when he achieves them.

For preschool-aged children, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends resolutions that focus on cleaning up toys, brushing teeth and washing hands and being kind to pets. However, parents who consider these behaviors part of their regular expectations may want to provide resolutions that focus on higher goals.

Older children can begin to understand the relationship between a resolution and an improved outcome. Younger kids may view the whole exercise as a game. It doesn’t matter; whatever helps each family member accomplish his or her goal is the more important issue.

When your child gets into adolescence, the AAP recommendations focus more on the child taking more responsibility for his actions, including taking care of his body, dealing with stress in a healthy way, talking through conflict, resisting drugs and alcohol and helping others through community service.

Parents are the role models in this dynamic. Just as with everything else you do, your child is watching. “Parents should be reflective about how they wish to be in the coming year,” Siegel says. “It’s a good opportunity to promote good mental and physical health.”

Just like adults, kids know the thrill of accomplishing something, especially when their parents acknowledge them. As you go over the family list of resolutions each month or quarter, take time to acknowledge the successes, along with reinforcing the resolutions that need more attention. “Children will benefit by having the parent praise them, which will improve their self-esteem,” Siegel says. “This will help them with self-regulatory behaviors that they can integrate into being a healthy adult.”

Review time is not punish time for unmet resolutions. That may seem obvious, but emotions can get the best of us when things don’t go the way we planned. It’s important to be flexible but also understanding. The resolution is a guide for betterment, not written in stone. Understanding, compassion and dealing with issues head-on can help keep everyone on track.  Learning to take responsibility for our decisions, being able to change our mind and find a better solution and discussing new options, all help in making resolutions a reality.

However your family arrives at resolutions, the best part is that you’re doing it together and learning how to manage your role not only in the family but also in the larger world.

Story source: Laura Lewis Brown, http://www.pbs.org/parents/holidays/making-new-years-resolutions-child/

 

Parenting

Helping Shy Children Find Their Way

2:00

With school back in session, many shy kids are facing a difficult time. As a parent, you’re already familiar with your child’s personality and can tell when he or she is experiencing anxiety in a social situation.  Once your child enters school, there are going to be times when your little one is immersed in surroundings that may make them very uncomfortable, but along with challenges comes solutions.

As parents of a shy child, there are two traps to avoid: overprotectiveness and pressure. Trying to get your child to be more outgoing will only make him or her retreat. And sheltering denies them the chance to enjoy group activities or become comfortable in social circumstances. You have to walk a tightrope, promoting social behavior with compassion.

Some children are shy from birth and have a genetic predisposition to be that way. Other kids are shy only during certain situations that make them uncomfortable or afraid. These might include:

·      Meeting new people

·      Entering new situations

·      Being singled out or being the center of attention

·      Not knowing how they're expected to act or what they're expected to say

·      Being laughed at, embarrassed, or teased

Quite frankly, the last situation makes just about everyone uncomfortable, but for children that are naturally shy, it can be quite traumatic.

One tip for parents is to try and use the word “shy” less often when describing their child. Being labeled can make your child feel less confident. Being labeled anything presents a certain amount of pressure to live up to its definition. 

Instead, put a positive spin on his or her shyness. Maybe a more accurate characterization is "slow to warm up"; rather than withdrawing from or avoiding new situations, he or she just takes their time and sizes up the scene. This can be translated into a compliment: "You like to think things through," or "You like to get started slowly." As time goes on, your child can adopt this more positive view of him or her self and use it as a rebuttal if someone challenges their behavior.

Kids are often fearful when they don't have the social skills necessary to feel comfortable during a particular scenario. A child who hasn't spent much time around large groups of people, for instance, is more likely to want to avoid them. A child with low self-esteem or one who's been pushed hard academically may be afraid to fail, leading to shyness. Watch your child closely to see what triggers his or her shyness. Once you understand their anxieties better, you can talk them through and work together on ways to overcome them.

School is going to be a place where kids experience a tremendous amount of socialization- whether they want it or not. So why not practice difficult situations at home? This way, children have an idea of how to respond either before an event happens or before it happens again.

In an uncomfortable situation, a shy kid experiences the same physiological reactions that adults do. Your child may feel shaky, get sweaty, or turn red. His heart may race, or she may get a frog in her throat. If his reaction is visible to those around him, he may get even more embarrassed, setting up a cycle of awkwardness each time he has to step up to the plate.

With practice and reassurance, though, your child can prepare for those moments that throw him or her for a loop. You and your child can talk through the situations that make them nervous or, if your child is willing, even act them out together. He may giggle and think it's silly to practice saying hello at a birthday party or introducing himself to the soccer team, but he'll also begin to feel more confident in his ability to be friendly and relaxed.

You might also remind your child that it's normal to be nervous when meeting someone new, starting a new class, or being called upon by a teacher to speak. Describe one of your own flustered moments to show that most people have the same feelings.

In a child’s mind, one of the most important aspects of school is fitting in. This is a time when parents can make helpful suggestions. You might encourage him or her to get involved in activities by discussing the value of participation and then helping them discover a sport or activity they like to do. The key is to find something that suits them -- perhaps where they can be part of a team but still function as an individual, such as running cross-country or singing in the chorus. When a child realizes he or she is good at something, their confidence will rise, and so will their enthusiasm. However, if your child really resists, don't turn it into a power struggle. In a low-key way, keep making suggestions and trust that they’ll be drawn into an activity eventually.

Shyness should be a bump in the road, not a roadblock. With some anguish and a certain number of false steps, even very shy children can learn to forge relationships and cope when the spotlight is on them. They may have fewer friends than other kids, but those friendships will be just as close.

In rare cases, a child is so shy that he or she begins to avoid all interactions. If you are concerned that your child's shyness is isolating them or undermining their ability to function, seek help from a school counselor or your family pediatrician. Either may have valuable advice and can refer you to a specialist if necessary.

Yes, it can be like walking a tightrope trying to help a shy child learn how to handle uncomfortable situations. You don’t want to pressure too much or protect too much and it can be emotionally challenging figuring out the next step.  

By accepting your child as he or she is, you can help them accept who they are. It may help to remind yourself that your child's temperament isn't a reflection of your parenting skills. As long as he or she has some friends, is reasonably happy with his or her self, and can function as a student and family member, all is well. Praise your kid for their efforts to be social, provide advice when asked, keep an eye on their progress and challenges and know that they will find their way in the world.

Story source: Anne Krueger, https://consumer.healthday.com/encyclopedia/children-s-health-10/child-development-news-124/shyness-ages-6-to-12-645930.html

Parenting

Sharing Too Much About Your Kids on Social Media

1:45

In a few days from now, your social media site of preference will be flooded with pictures of young children in cute Halloween costumes out for an evening of trick or treating.  It’s safe to say, online landscapes have replaced the old hard-cover family album. Relatives, friends and even strangers are just a click away from viewing your child’s most significant moments.

While many parents often keep a watchful eye on their kids social media use, they might want to think about how much personal information they are sharing about their family.

"This is all so new. Our parents didn't deal with this," said Dr. Bahareh Keith, an assistant of pediatrics at the University of Florida College of Medicine, in Gainesville.

Before social media, parents might embarrass their kids by showing old photo albums to a few family members and friends.  Now, the things parents disclose online -- the good and not so good -- leave a lasting "digital footprint," Keith explained.

The researchers cite an astonishing statistic in their review: Studies have shown that 92 percent of 2-year-olds in the United States have an online presence, and about one-third make their first appearance on social media within 24 hours of their birth.

Not only do parents share the “Hallmark” moments in their children’s lives, but some parents also share personal information about their child’s struggles with behavioral issues that can end up in the public domain. Social media outlets such as Facebook allow friends of “friends” to view your posts. You may or may not know who these people are. Public information about your child’s personal behavior, Keith points out, can have psychological repercussions for kids.

On a more sinister note, public information about your home life can help thieves and pedophiles link together a profile on your family - such as where your child attends school, when you are at work or on vacation, your child’s most vulnerable tendencies and a host of other things you’d rather strangers not know.

According to Keith, there has been little research on the issue, probably because it's so new. Her team did a review of the medical and legal literature on the subject, to come up with some guidelines for parents.

For now, she offered some advice on how to post wisely:

·      Never share pictures of your child in "any state of undress."

·      Be careful about posts that give your child's precise location.

·      If you are going online for help with your child's behavioral issues, keep any information sharing anonymous.

Be sure to understand the privacy policies of the sites you post on. Simply limiting your Facebook posts to "friends" is not enough, Keith said. If someone else is tagged in a photo, for example, the friends of that person may see it.

Keith says the review is not to scare parents from sharing family photos or bragging about their children’s accomplishments online, but to use caution in what you share and when.

"We're not saying 'don't share,' " she said. "Just share wisely."

That's not only to keep kids safe, but to respect their privacy, according to Keith.

With older kids, she said, always ask if it's OK to post a photo or share a story.

With younger kids, try to think ahead. "Look forward," Keith said. "Ask yourself, at the age of 14, will my child be OK with this? If you're in doubt, don't post it."

It's natural for parents to focus on their kids when they're using social media, said Dr. David Lloyd-Hill, chair of the AAP's Council on Communications and Media.

"If you're a parent," he said, "the most important and exciting things in your life are probably centered on your kids."

But while those posts may be well meaning, Lloyd-Hill agreed that parents should think before they share and take some sensible precautions.

The bigger concern, he said, is children's privacy, and whether the images and information parents choose to share will hurt their child in some way -- now or years down the road.

"Yes, we need to be monitoring our kids' social media posts," Lloyd-Hill said. "But we also need to look at our own."

Keith is scheduled to present her findings at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), in San Francisco this Friday. Research presented at meetings is considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Story source: Amy Norton, https://consumer.healthday.com/health-technology-information-18/misc-computer-health-news-150/what-not-to-post-online-about-your-kids-716055.html

 

Parenting

It’s Turkey Time! Safety Tips for Preparation & Cooking

2:00

We’re closing in on Thanksgiving Day and the time of year when families gather together, give thanks and enjoy a fabulous meal. Whether you’re a seasoned pro or it’s the first time you’re in charge of making the holiday meal- you need to know the safest ways to thaw, prepare, stuff and cook your turkey.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC) offers these suggestions to keep your kitchen and meal safe.

When preparing a turkey, be aware of the four main safety issues: thawing, preparing, stuffing, and cooking to the adequate temperature.

The Food Thermometer: Using a food thermometer is the only reliable way to ensure safety and to determine desired "doneness" of meat, poultry, and egg products. To be safe, these foods must be cooked to a safe minimum internal temperature to destroy any harmful microorganisms that may be in the food.

"Doneness" refers to when a food is cooked to a desired state and indicates the sensory aspects of foods such as texture, appearance, and juiciness. Unlike the temperatures required for safety, these sensory aspects are subjective.

Some food thermometers must be calibrated to ensure that they read food temperature accurately. Find out if your thermometer can be calibrated.

Safe Thawing: Thawing turkeys must be kept at a safe temperature. The "danger zone" is between 40 and 140°F — the temperature range where foodborne bacteria multiply rapidly. While frozen, a turkey is safe indefinitely, but as soon as it begins to thaw, bacteria that may have been present before freezing can begin to grow again, if it is in the "danger zone."

There are three safe ways to thaw food: in the refrigerator, in cold water, and in a microwave oven

Safe Preparation:  Bacteria present on raw poultry can contaminate your hands, utensils, and work surfaces as you prepare the turkey. If these areas are not cleaned thoroughly before working with other foods, bacteria from the raw poultry can then be transferred to other foods. After working with raw poultry, always wash your hands, utensils, and work surfaces before they touch other foods.

Safe Stuffing: For optimal safety and uniform doneness, cook the stuffing outside the turkey in a casserole dish. Stuffing should not be prepared ahead. The dry and wet ingredients for stuffing can be prepared ahead of time and chilled. However, do not mix wet and dry ingredients until just before spooning the stuffing mixture into a poultry cavity, in/on other meat, or into a casserole. If stuffing a whole turkey, chicken, or other bird, spoon the stuffing in loosely using about 3/4 cup of stuffing per pound. The stuffing should be moist, not dry, because heat destroys bacteria more rapidly in a moist environment.

Using a food thermometer, make sure the center of the stuffing reaches a safe minimum internal temperature of 165°F. Bacteria can survive in stuffing that has not reached 165°F, possibly resulting in foodborne illness.

Safe Cooking: Set the oven temperature no lower than 325°F and be sure the turkey is completely thawed. Place turkey breast-side up on a flat wire rack in a shallow roasting pan 2 to 2-1/2 inches deep. Check the internal temperature at the center of the stuffing and meaty portion of the breast, thigh, and wing joint using a food thermometer. Cooking times will vary. The food thermometer must reach a safe minimum internal temperature of 165°F. Let the turkey stand 20 minutes before removing all stuffing from the cavity and carving the meat.

For more information on safe internal temperatures, check out, http://www.foodsafety.gov/keep/charts/mintemp.html

Have a wonder and safe Thanksgiving!

Sources: http://www.cdc.gov/features/turkeytime, http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/poultry-preparation/stuffing-and-food-safety

http://www.foodsafety.gov/keep/charts/mintemp.html

 

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