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Parenting

Recent Hurricane Disasters May Have Lasting Impact on Kids

2:15

Children may experience long lasting trauma from either living through or even viewing images of natural disasters such as hurricanes, Harvey and Irma, experts say.

"Compared to adults, children suffer more from exposure to disasters, including psychological, behavioral and physical problems, as well as difficulties learning in school," Jessica Dym Bartlett, a senior research scientist at Child Trends, said in that organization's news release.

It’s reasonable to think that children who have actually had to live through the devastation of being in a hurricane could be traumatized and suffer post-traumatic stress syndrome, (PTSD.) But child mental health experts say that even kids who have seen pictures of the damage and watched news reports can also be traumatized and may develop similar symptoms of PTSD such as depression and anxiety.

"Understand that trauma reactions vary widely. Children may regress, demand extra attention and think about their own needs before those of others -- natural responses that should not be met with anger or punishment," Dym Bartlett said.

To help children through this difficult time, parents should create a comforting and safe environment where their child’s basic needs are met. Keep to regular schedules and other routines that provide children with a sense of safety and predictability.

Children that stay busy are also less likely to have continuing negative thoughts; boredom can worsen adverse thoughts and behaviors. Youngsters are less likely to feel distress if they play and interact with others, Dym Bartlett noted.

Limiting your child’s exposure to the continuous images and descriptions of disasters coming from news reports is also helpful, but it’s not necessary to try and eliminate everything pertaining to catastrophes. It’s better to help children understand what has happened in age-appropriate language and to empathize hope and positivity. Reassurance that you are there for them and will do all that is humanly possible to protect them can ease some of the fear associated with disasters.

"Find age-appropriate ways for children to help. Even very young children benefit from being able to make a positive difference in others' lives while learning important lessons about empathy, compassion and gratitude," Dym Bartlett said.

If a child continues to have difficulties coping for longer than six weeks after an event, like the hurricanes, the National Child Traumatic Stress Network recommends seeking professional help.

Parents and caregivers should also make sure that they take care of their own emotional health during these trying and sad times.

Story source: Health Day News, https://www.upi.com/Health_News/2017/09/12/Hurricanes-may-take-lasting-emotional-toll-on-kids/4141505232381/?utm_source=sec&utm_campaign=sl&utm_medium=14

Parenting

175,000 Target Dressers Recalled Due to Tip-Over Hazards

2:00

On the heals of several other recent dresser drawer recalls, Target has announced that they are recalling 175,000 dressers because they present a serious danger to young children.

The retailer is pulling their popular Room Essentials 4-drawer dresser line and says consumers should immediately stop using the product if it is not securely anchored to a wall.

Unanchored, the dressers can pose serious tip-over and entrapment hazards that can result in death or injuries to children.

No injuries have been reported to the company, but it has received 12 notifications of dressers tipping or collapsing, including an incident where one fell on two three-year-old children. 

Consumers can ask for a refund by contacting Target at 800-440-0680 from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. CT daily or online at www.Target.com and click on “Recalls” at the bottom of the page, then “Furniture” for more information, or the “Product Recalls” tab on www.Facebook.com/Target.

This recall involves Room Essentials 4-drawer dressers sold in three colors. The dressers measure 41 7/8 - inches tall by 31 ½ inches wide by 15 11/16 - inches deep. Model number 249-05-0103 (black), 249-05-0106 (espresso), or 249-05-0109 (maple) is printed on the product’s packaging.

Story source: https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2017/Target-Recalls-Room-Essentials-4-Drawer-Dressers

Parenting

Labor Day History for Kids

2:00

For younger Americans, Labor Day signals the end of summer and the beginning of a new school year. Communities, families and friends often celebrate with parades, parties and cookouts.  Many children and young adults don’t know the significance of Labor Day and how it came to be. Here’s a brief history that can help explain this national holiday to youngsters.

Labor Day is also known as the “workingperson’s holiday.” That’s because it was created to celebrate and honor hard working Americans that helped build this great country.

So, how did Labor Day come to be? It began in the 19th century.

During the second “Industrial Revolution” America was experiencing an explosion of new and exciting ideas and inventions. In the late 1800s lots of people from rural areas and farms, as well immigrants from other countries, moved into the cities looking for work. This population explosion completely altered the landscape of the American city.

One of the most historical inventions was the creation of the assembly line – a way for workers to make more products quicker and cheaper.  Another major change was in transportation. The steam engine allowed trains to carry products and passengers faster and farther than ever before. Coal became the primary source of power to move the train engines, heat buildings and generate electricity. With an abundance of people looking for jobs, factory and mine owners had plenty of willing workers to choose from. While this may have been good for the owners, it was not so good for the workers.

During these times, many people labored very long hours, with little pay, in unsafe factories and mines to produce the products needed. Even children as young as six years old worked all day in the same factories and mines and made even less money than the adults. Their jobs were physically and mentally hard as well as dangerous.

As conditions worsened, the workers decided they needed better and safer places to work, higher wages and an age limit on who could be hired. They formed groups known as unions to help make this happen. Sometimes the union workers would hold marches and protests to complain about the bad conditions and low pay. It wasn’t long before unions grew in membership and spread to different trades (or jobs) around the country.

To accomplish the changes the unions wanted, members organized strikes, protests and rallies. Some of the factory, companies and mine owners fought against the unions by firing the members, bringing in new workers and hiring people that would attack the protesters. On several occasions, police officers were involved in breaking up the protests or removing union workers. Sometimes the protests and strikes became very violent and people lost their lives or were severely injured. It was a very difficult time for people standing up for the right to work in a safe place, for a reasonable amount of time and to be paid an honest wage.

On September 5, 1882, almost 10,000 workers marched to Union Square in New York City marking the first unofficial Labor Day parade in U.S history.

Every year after that, this celebration of workers became more popular in other parts of the United States. In 1887, Oregon was the first state to pass a law making Labor Day a holiday. The same year, other states such as Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York also began passing laws recognizing Labor Day as a holiday.

Seven years later, in 1894, Congress passed an act that made Labor Day a national holiday. From that time till now, the first Monday of September is dedicated to celebrating the bravery and tenacity of American workers.

Happy Labor Day from the KidsDr!

 

Parenting

Picky Eaters and Personality

1:45

If you have a child that is a picky eater, the reason may have more to do with his or her personality than the food you give them, according to a new study.

Researchers found that little ones who were more naturally inhibited also tended to be picky eaters.

"From the time they're very young, some infants are more 'approaching' and react positively to new things, whereas other infants are more 'withdrawing' and react negatively to the same stimuli," said study author Kameron Moding.

"But very few studies have examined whether infants show similar approach and withdrawal behaviors in response to new foods, so this is what we wanted to investigate," added Moding. She is a postdoctoral fellow at University of Colorado, Denver.

Researchers observed how 136 infants responded to new foods and toys during the first 18 months of life. They found that the children who were more reserved about playing with new toys were also more reserved about trying new foods.

The researchers determined that there might be a link between personality types and attitudes about food.

"It was striking how consistently the responses to new foods related to the responses to new toys," Moding said in a Penn State news release.

"Not only were they associated at 12 months, but those responses also predicted reactions to new objects six months later. They also followed the same developmental pattern across the first year of life," she added.

Getting some children to try new foods can be a challenge, but Moding says parents shouldn’t give up offering a variety of foods to their kids.

Keep trying! Research from other labs has consistently shown that infants and children can learn to accept new foods if their caregivers continue to offer them," Moding said. "It can take as many as eight to 10 tries, but infants and children can learn to accept and eat even initially disliked foods."

Story source: Robert Preidt, https://consumer.healthday.com/caregiving-information-6/infant-and-child-care-health-news-410/picky-eater-it-might-just-be-your-child-s-personality-725183.html

Parenting

Back-to-School Jitters

2:00

Where did the summer go? Some children will be headed back to school in less than a week and others within the next couple of weeks. It’s not uncommon for kids to be a little anxious as the big day draws near. Your child may be feeling a lot of emotions right now, ranging from high anxiety to  “I can’t wait.” That's understandable. Think back on how you felt when you started a new job or were moving to a new part of the country, it’s quite similar but without the benefit of life experience to help you process the changes.

Besides the unknown of a new school year, there’s the challenge of getting back into an early morning routine and the addition of after-school activities to everyone’s schedule. It’s a hectic time but with a lot of patience and a little smart planning, it can go smoother than you might think.

If your child’s school offers an orientation or back–to-school night, one way to help ease your little one’s fear is to take them and let them see the school, meet their teachers and say hello to some fellow students before classes begin. A familiar face or two can help make the transition go a little smoother during that first week of school.

If your child is able to meet his or her teachers, give them time to talk and get to know each other, if only briefly. Let your child answer any questions the teachers have instead of answering for them. You might even help your child come up with a few questions they can ask the teacher.

You could check with the teacher and see if he or she would mind having a picture taken with your child. As school day approaches, you can show it to your child talk about meeting their teacher. A little thing like that can help your child develop a familiar feeling for the teacher before school starts.

Since it’s always a good idea to read to your youngster, choose books with a back-to-school theme. There are lots of children’s books that tell meaningful stories about kids facing the challenges of moving to a new school, the first year of school, making new friends and lots of other possible scenarios in story form.

Get organized! Easier said than done, I know. If you’re organized and ready for school it not only relieves some of the pressure on you, but for your children too. Chaos or uncertainty about where to go and what to do adds fuel to a child’s concerns about whether everything is going to be OK or not. 

Let your child help create a study area in the home. Being involved in at least some of the decisions can help make this a personal adventure that they have some say in.

All kids need enough sleep and getting into a good sleep routine can help ease them into the changes school is going to require. As you already know from experience, a tired child is more likely to feel overwhelmed, nervous and cranky.  If you haven’t already, start the new bedtime routine now so that you don’t have the arguments and resistance during the first days of school when everyone is trying to find their footing.

The main thing to remember is that your child, whether it’s their first day to attend, or their last year of school, is going to feel a little jittery. Reassure him or her that everything is going to be fine. The new schedule, classmates, studies and activities will be familiar sooner than they think. Let them know that you understand how the unknown can be a little scary, but that this is also a time when good things can happen as they explore all their new opportunities. 

 

Parenting

Back to School Road Safety Tips

2:00

Millions of U.S. children are starting a new school year and along with the joy and excitement comes traffic congestion.

It's never more important for drivers to slow down and pay attention than when kids are present – especially before and after school.

The National Safety Council offers these tips to drivers sharing the road with parents and caregivers dropping off or picking up their kids and school busses loading and unloading students.

If you’re dropping off your children, familiarize yourself with the specific drop off rules of your child’s school. More children are hit by cars near schools than at any other location according to the National Safe Routes to School program. These tips can apply to all school zones:

·      No double-parking. It blocks the visibility for other children and drivers.

·      Don’t load or unload kids across the street from the school

·      Carpool to reduce the number of vehicles at the school.

When you’re sharing the road with young pedestrians, remember these safety tips:

  • Don't block the crosswalk when stopped at a red light or waiting to make a turn, forcing pedestrians to go around you; this could put them in the path of moving traffic
  • In a school zone when flashers are blinking, stop and yield to pedestrians crossing the crosswalk or intersection
  • Always stop for a school patrol officer or crossing guard holding up a stop sign
  • Take extra care to look out for children in school zones, near playgrounds and parks, and in all residential areas
  • Don't honk or rev your engine to scare a pedestrian, even if you have the right of way
  • Never pass a vehicle stopped for pedestrians
  • Always use extreme caution to avoid striking pedestrians wherever they may be, no matter who has the right of way

Most likely, you’ll be sharing the road with school busses as well as other cars. A school bus is large, allow a greater following distance than if you were driving behind a car. It will give you more time to stop once the yellow lights start flashing. It is illegal in all 50 states to pass a school bus that is stopped to load or unload children.

  • Never pass a bus from behind – or from either direction if you're on an undivided road – if it is stopped to load or unload children
  • If the yellow or red lights are flashing and the stop arm is extended, traffic must stop
  • The area 10 feet around a school bus is the most dangerous for children; stop far enough back to allow them space to safely enter and exit the bus
  • Be alert; children often are unpredictable, and they tend to ignore hazards and take risks

Cars and busses aren’t the only vehicles on the road around a school; there are also kids on bikes.  On most roads, bicyclists have the same rights and responsibilities as drivers. Bikes can be hard to see though, particularly small ones with little riders. Children riding bikes create special problems for drivers because usually they are not able to properly determine traffic conditions. The most common cause of collision is a driver turning left in front of a bicyclist.

  • When passing a bicyclist, proceed in the same direction slowly, and leave 3 feet between your car and the cyclist
  • When turning left and a bicyclist is approaching in the opposite direction, wait for the rider to pass
  • If you're turning right and a bicyclists is approaching from behind on the right, let the rider go through the intersection first, and always use your turn signals
  • Watch for bike riders turning in front of you without looking or signaling; children especially have a tendency to do this
  • Be extra vigilant in school zones and residential neighborhoods
  • Watch for bikes coming from driveways or behind parked cars
  • Check side mirrors before opening your door

School zone speed lights will soon be or are already flashing, so you’ll have to retrain your eyes to look for them. By exercising a little extra care and caution, drivers and pedestrians can co-exist safely in school zones.

Story source: http://www.nsc.org/learn/safety-knowledge/Pages/back-to-school-safety-ti...

Parenting

Labor Day Safety Tips!

2:30

Traditionally, Labor Day is the fond farewell to summer and a welcomed hello to autumn. Lots of people will be on the roads, having backyard or park reunions, grilling, swimming and basically enjoying family and friends get-togethers.

To make this Labor Day a safe one, here are some tips that can help keep you from having to make a trip to the ER on this special weekend:

Road Safety.

-       Before you start out on a trip, make sure that your vehicle is in good condition, and see that any necessary maintenance is performed.

-       Just as adults and kids should always wear a seat belt, infants should always be properly secured in car seats.  

-       Be sure to follow all traffic laws while on the road, and use extra caution while driving in construction zones.

-       Be vigilant about paying attention to the road, and avoid distractions such as cell phones. Even just a momentary look away from the road can drastically increase your chances of a crash.

-       Be mindful of other vehicles on the road and remember to keep a safe distance between your vehicle and others. Keep in mind that semi-trucks, for example, require more time to come to a stop than cars do, and have large blind spots.

-       Keep an eye out for motorcyclists. Motorcycles are more difficult to see because they are smaller and can swiftly move in and out of traffic.

-       Even though you may have GPS, keep a map in the car and road flares in the trunk.

Food Safety. Picnics, barbeques, and neighborhood potlucks are plentiful and that means so is the chance of food-borne illness. To minimize the chance of cross-contamination:

-       Wash your hands before and after you touch raw meat.

-       Dry your hands on paper towels instead of cloth towels, and discard immediately. Refrigerate meat that’s waiting to hit the grill.

-       Never leave food that requires refrigeration (think potato salad, coleslaw or chicken salad) out in the sun. Instead, set the item the bowl is in on top of a pan filled with ice, and serve from a shaded area.

-       Return the item to the refrigerator as soon as guests have been served.

Boat Safety. Lots of folks will be heading to the lake for a family and/or friends boating adventure over the Labor Day weekend. Make it a safe one with these suggestions:

-       Have your boat in good mechanical condition and have all safety equipment on board such as personal flotation devices, an emergency kit and a first aid kit.

-       Stay away from restricted areas.

-       Make sure someone on land knows when you leave, about what time you’re expecting to return, where you’re headed and who all is on board.

-       Take a fully charged cell phone with you.

-       Everyone should have a life-vest on, including infants.

-       Maintain safe speeds and keep a lookout for hidden objects below the waterline

-       Maintain a 50-foot distance from other boats, swimmers, docks and the shore unless operating at an idle speed.

-       Install a marine-grade CO detector in your boat

-       Keep a flashlight and fresh batteries available.

-       Choose a designated driver before launching. Passengers that drink alcohol should drink in moderation.

-       Have plenty of water on board to avoid dehydration.

Pool and Water Safety. Pools and lakes are another place you’ll find plenty of people this Labor Day. That means lots of children will be in the water as well. It’s always best if someone knows CPR, if you don’t know it now – make a point of the family taking CPR classes together soon.

-       Appoint a “designated watcher” to monitor children during social gatherings at or near pools or water.

-       Have a fully charged cell phone with you. Call 911 immediately if a child is found unconscious in water.

-       Keep rescue equipment poolside or with you at the lake. Don’t wait for the paramedics to arrive because you will lose valuable life-saving seconds. Four to six minutes without oxygen can cause permanent brain damage or death.

-       Have a first-aid kit close by.

-       Maintain constant visual contact with children in a pool or lake or near a pool or lake. If a child is missing, check the water first; seconds count in preventing death or disability.

-       Never use flotation devices as a substitute for supervision. 

-       Don’t assume you’ll hear a child who’s in trouble in the water; child drowning is a silent death, with no splashing to alert anyone that the child is in trouble.

-       At public pools, use one that has a lifeguard. While not a substitute for parental or caretaker supervision, the more eyes available, the better.

Whether you’re splashing in a pool, enjoying the ultimate picnic or enjoying a ride on a boat, we want you to stay safe this Labor Day weekend. Remember: An accident is never planned. But keeping out safety tips in mind may help prevent one.

Story sources: http://www.cooneyconway.com/blog/road-safety-labor-day-weekend

https://www.safewise.com/blog/7-safety-tips-for-an-injury-free-labor-day/

http://www.nationalwatersafetymonth.org/water-safety-tips

Parenting

Cashews Recalled Due to Glass Pieces

1:30

Nuts have become a go-to snack for many families looking to live a healthier life. If you’ve purchased cashews from an ALDI grocery store recently, be sure to check and see if the brand is Southern Grove Cashew Halves and Pieces with Sea Salt.

The recall was initiated after the company received consumer reports of glass found in the product. To date, there have not been any reported injuries. Potentially impacted product has been removed from store shelves.

This recall affects the Southern Grove Cashew Halves and Pieces with Sea Salt sold in 8-ounce (227-gram) canisters, labeled with UPC No. 041498179366. The affected cashews have best by dates of 11/27/18 and 11/28/18.

The cashews were sold by ALDI stores in 29 states: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Washington, D.C., West Virginia, and Wisconsin.

Consumers who have purchased the product in question are urged not to consume this product and may return the product to their local ALDI store for a refund or dispose of the item.

Consumers with questions may contact Star Snacks at 201-882-4593 or RecallFEQ01@gmail.com, Monday-Friday 9 am – 2 pm EST.

Story source: https://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm562129.htm

Parenting

Vegetarian Diet Is Good For the Whole Family

1:456

Has your teen or little one brought up the idea of going vegetarian? In the current age of online videos and social media groups, a lot of kids are seeing and learning about animal product processing and are experimenting with the idea of changing what they eat. While it may seem like a silly idea at first, you might want to give it further consideration.

For years, some people have thought that vegetarian and vegan diets may not be healthy enough for children.

A new study published by the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND), says not to worry, vegetarian and vegan diets can be safe and healthy for people of any age.

In fact, several studies show that vegetarians generally have lower risks of obesity and chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease and certain cancers, according to the AND. That includes vegans -- who avoid not only meat and fish, but also all animal products, including dairy.

"No one should doubt that vegetarian diets are safe at all life stages, including infancy, childhood and adolescence," says Susan Levin, one of the report authors and director of nutrition education at the nonprofit Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine in Washington, D.C.

Levin also noted that studies show children on vegetarian diets eat more fruits and vegetables, and fewer sweets and salty snack foods. They're also less likely to be overweight or obese.

The academy also noted that vegetarian and vegan diets can be safe during pregnancy and lactation. These diets can also be fine for athletes and the elderly, the report said.

While all this information sounds promising, what you include in your vegetarian diet is the key to staying healthy. If you subsist on white rice, Levin pointed out, that might be technically vegetarian, but not nutritious.

So it's important to eat a variety of foods, including a range of whole grains, beans, fruits and vegetables, and nuts and seeds.

Vegetarians and vegan diets do lack one important nutrient found in animal products– vitamin B-12.

According to the AND report, vegans should take supplemental vitamin B12. Vegetarians usually need supplements or B12-fortified foods, too, the group said -- since their dairy intake may not supply enough of the nutrient.

But, Levin said, B12 is the only supplement vegans need. They can get all of their other nutrient needs from food.

Getting enough protein, calcium and iron has been another concern about vegetarian diets and particularly vegan diets. That shouldn’t be a problem, Levin says, as long as you make wise food choices.

The report noted, it's imperative to make wise food choices: Calcium from vegetables like kale, turnip greens and bok-choy is much better absorbed than calcium from high-oxalate vegetables such as spinach and Swiss chard, for example.

As for the potential health benefits, studies have found that vegetarians and vegans tend to weigh less and have lower cholesterol levels than omnivores do. They also tend to have lower risks of high blood pressure, heart disease, type 2 diabetes and certain cancers, such as cancers of the prostate and gastrointestinal tract.

"If there were a pill that did all of that," Levin said, "everyone would be taking it."

Lots of families aren’t necessarily willing to give up all animal products, but would like to cut down on their meat consumption. Vegetarian and vegan recipes can help fill the void on meatless lunch and dinners while offering a nutritious substitute.

The AND report also notes that vegetarian diets are kinder to the environment.

It takes far fewer resources -- land, water, fuel and fertilizer -- to produce a pound of kidney beans than a pound of beef, for example.

"Vegetarian diets leave a lighter carbon footprint," said Levin.

The ADA suggests that families interested in going completely vegetarian or vegan should seek assistance from a registered dietician to help them learn about the various sources of protein and other vital nutrients. Vegetarian cookbooks and classes are also available for families thinking of making a dietary switch. There are also very good informational resources online.

Story source: Amy Norton, https://consumer.healthday.com/vitamins-and-nutrition-information-27/food-and-nutrition-news-316/vegetarian-diets-benefit-people-and-the-planet-717307.html

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