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Parenting

What Age Should Kids Get Their First Dental Check-up?

2:30

When should you take your child to the dentist for his or her first check-up? The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American Dental Association (ADA,) recommend that parents should take their child for a check-up when the first tooth appears, or no later than his/her first birthday to prevent dental problems.

However, a new national survey finds that American parents are less likely to seek early dental care for their children if they don't receive guidance from a doctor or dentist.

"Visiting the dentist at an early age is an essential part of children's health care," said Sarah Clark, co-director of the University of Michigan's C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health.

"These visits are important for the detection and treatment of early childhood tooth decay, and also a valuable opportunity to educate parents on key aspects of oral health," she added in a university new release.

The survey of 790 parents, with at least one child aged 5 or younger, found that one in six of those who did not receive dental advice from a health care provider thought children shouldn't visit a dentist until age 4 or older.

One of the reasons many parents do not take their child to the dentist at the correct age may be because they are getting their information from the wrong sources.

Clark said the poll showed "that when parents get clear guidance from their child's doctor or dentist, they understand the first dental visit should take place at an early age. Without such guidance, some parents turn to family or friends for advice. As recommendations change, they may be hearing outdated information and not getting their kids to the dentist early enough."

Unfortunately, more than half of parents did not receive guidance from their child's doctor or a dentist about when to start taking their child to the dentist. 

Among parents who did not receive guidance from a doctor or dentist, only 35 percent thought dentist visits should start when children are aged 1 year or younger, according to the poll.

Reasons varied on why parents had not yet taken their child to a dentist. The most common explanations among 40 percent of the parents participating in the survey included: the child is not old enough (42 percent); the child's teeth are healthy (25 percent); and the child would be afraid of the dentist (15 percent).

Sixty percent of parents said their child had seen a dentist, and 79 percent of those parents said the dentist visit was worthwhile, the findings showed.

The Mott Poll noted that the risk of delaying dentist visits is that early signs of tooth decay may not be noticeable. In this poll, one quarter of parents who had delayed dental visits said their child’s teeth are healthy. However, it is unlikely that a parent could detect early tooth decay. By the time decay becomes obvious due to discoloration, the problem likely has become substantial. Prompt dental treatment at the first sign of decay can prevent more significant dental problems. Therefore, having regular dentist visits throughout early childhood increases the likelihood that decay will be identified and treated before major problems develop.

You can find more information about the importance of regular dental visits on the AAP website at https://www.healthychildren.org/English/healthy-living/oral-health/Pages/Why-Regular-Dental-Visits-Are-Important.aspx

Story sources: Robert Preidt, https://consumer.healthday.com/dental-and-oral-information-9/misc-dental-problem-news-174/many-parents-in-the-dark-on-when-kids-should-first-see-a-dentist-731181.html

https://mottpoll.org/reports/delayed-start-dentist-visits-parents-need-provider-prompt

 

Parenting

Talking to Your Child About School Shootings

3:00

When something as emotionally overwhelming and tragic as a school shooting occurs, children are bound to worry if something like that could happen at their school.

Children’s mental health experts say children need an outlet to express their fears and worries, but oftentimes parents and caregivers are at a loss for words. 

According to Mental Health America (MHA,) a community based non-profit dedicated to promoting mental health throughout the country, knowing how to talk with your child about school safety issues could be critical in recognizing and preventing acts of violence, and could play an important role in easing fear and anxieties about their personal safety.

MHA offers these guidelines to get the discussion started and how to steer the conversions for a positive outcome.

  • Encourage children to talk about their concerns and to express their feelings. Some children may be hesitant to initiate such conversation, so you may want to prompt them by asking if they feel safe at school. When talking with younger children remember to talk on their level. For example, they may not understand the term “violence” but can talk to you about being afraid or a classmate who is mean to them.
  • Talk honestly about your own feelings regarding school violence. It is important for children to recognize they are not dealing with their fears alone.
  • Validate the child’s feelings. Do not minimize a child’s concerns. Let him/her know that serious school violence is not common, which is why incidents such as the latest school shooting in Parkland, Florida, and previous shootings attract so much media attention. Stress that schools are safe places. In fact, recent studies have shown that schools are more secure now than ever before.
  • Empower children to take action regarding school safety. Encourage them to report specific incidents (such as bullying, threats or talk of suicide) and to develop problem solving and conflict resolution skills. Encourage older children to actively participate in student-run anti-violence programs.
  • Discuss the safety procedures that are in place at your child’s school. Explain why visitors sign in at the principal’s office or certain doors remain locked during the school day. Help your child understand that such precautions are in place to ensure his or her safety and stress the importance of adhering to school rules and policies.
  • Create safety plans with your child. Help identify which adults (a friendly secretary, trusted teacher or approachable administrator) your child can talk to if they feel threatened at school. Also ensure that your child knows how to reach you (or another family member or friend) in case of crisis during the school day. Remind your child that they can talk to you anytime they feel threatened.
  • Recognize behavior that may indicate your child is concerned about returning to school. Younger children may react to school violence by not wanting to attend school or participate in school-based activities. Teens and adolescents may minimize their concerns outwardly, but may become argumentative, withdrawn, or allow their school performance to decline.
  • Keep the dialogue going and make school safety a common topic in family discussions rather than just a response to an immediate crisis. Open dialogue will encourage children to share their concerns.
  • Seek help when necessary. If you are worried about a child’s reaction or have ongoing concerns about his/her behavior or emotions, contact a mental health professional at school or at your community mental health center. Your local Mental Health Association or the National Mental Health Association’s Information Center can direct you to resources in your community.

Educational psychologist and Parents Magazine advisor, Michele Borba, EdD, also has some tips to help parents with these important conversations.

"Chances are your child got wind of the shooting in class or from friends, but kids can easily get the facts wrong or misinterpret them, which escalates their fears," says Borba. Grade-schoolers especially tend to exaggerate things -- "That school is right next to ours!" or "50,000 kids were shot" -- and you want to make sure your child's not worrying over something completely unfounded.

Because peer interactions in schools play such an enormous role in how kids react to something, Borba suggests parents ask their child what their friends are saying about the event.

Tweens and teens -- and boys especially -- might be reluctant to open up and let you know that they're afraid or worried for their own safety. But they might be more apt to come clean with "Kyle was really upset about what happened," says Borba. Asking this question is also another way to ensure your child and his friends have the story straight.

Parents should reassure their child that their school is safe. Schools should be able to provide parents with an outline of precautions and safety procedures that are in place in case something like this should happen. Parents can ask school administrators the tough questions and relay the answers to their children in age-appropriate language.

With current technology, people have the ability to get almost real-time information when any event takes place anywhere in the world. Let your child know that they can talk to you about anything; the good, the bad, the frightening. 

Give serious thought to how you can talk to your child about these types of anxiety producing events. It’s difficult because everyone wonders how these kinds of tragedies keep happening, but as parents, you can help your child cope better when you’ve got a plan and have thought it through.

Story sources: http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/conditions/talking-kids-about-school-safety

Laura Wiener, http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/conditions/talking-kids-about-school-safety

 

Parenting

Alert! Cold Weather and Accidental CO Poisoning

2:30

As you know, extreme cold weather has gripped much of the U.S. this winter. From Texas to Florida, up the east coast and across the heartland, families have been struggling to stay warm. That’s pretty hard to do with temperatures in the minus 20s and wind chills in the minus 30s.

As temperatures drop, the use of gas heating goes up along with the risk for accidental carbon monoxide poisoning or CO.

That's because carbon monoxide exposure is both highly toxic and very hard to detect. The gas is colorless, tasteless and odorless.

As a result, more than 20,000 Americans seek emergency care each year for carbon monoxide poisoning, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More than 400 die.

As recently as last week, a teenager was killed and 41 others were sickened by carbon monoxide in a New Jersey apartment building. Officials say a clay liner in a chimney fell and blocked the carbon monoxide exhaust from escaping. No one in the apartment knew the liner had fallen and the carbon monoxide detector was not working at the time.

If you heat your home with gas, oil or coal, installing a carbon monoxide detector is one of the most important things you can do. Just like fire detectors, you have to make sure that the batteries are charged and replaced at least once a year.

CO can be emitted from gas furnaces, gas powered water heaters, charcoal grills, propane stoves, portable generators and cars left running in an enclosed area such as a garage.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends these guidelines to help prevent accidental CO poisoning:

·      DO have your heating system, water heater and any other gas, oil, or coal burning appliances serviced by a qualified technician every year.

·      DO install a battery-operated CO detector in your home and check or replace the battery when you change the time on your clocks each spring and fall. If the detector sounds leave your home immediately and call 911.

·      DO seek prompt medical attention if you suspect CO poisoning and are feeling dizzy, light-headed, or nauseous.

·      DON’T use a generator, charcoal grill, camp stove, or other gasoline or charcoal-burning device inside your home, basement, or garage or near a window.

·      DON’T run a car or truck inside a garage attached to your house, even if you leave the door open.

·      DON’T burn anything in a stove or fireplace that isn’t vented.

·      DON’T heat your house with a gas oven.

·      DON’T use a generator, pressure washer, or any gasoline-powered engine less than 20 feet from any window, door, or vent.  

Symptoms of CO poisoning may include sleepiness, headache, dizziness, blurred vision, vomiting, shortness of breath and convulsions.

Anyone experiencing such symptoms should be immediately pulled out into the open air. It's important to seek medical help right away: Call 911 or the Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222.

This has been and looks to continue to be, a brutal winter indeed.  Many families rely on gas and fireplaces to stay warm when temperatures plummet, like the ones we’re experiencing now. It’s extremely important to make sure that your home is protected from this silent killer, carbon monoxide.

Story sources: Alan Mozes, https://consumer.healthday.com/public-health-information-30/poisons-health-news-537/beware-carbon-monoxide-dangers-when-cold-weather-strikes-729829.html

https://www.cdc.gov/co/guidelines.htm

Parenting

Kidde Recalls 37 Million Fire Extinguishers!

2:30

Many families have a fire extinguisher in the home or car in case of a fire. These can be life and property savers – if they work properly. If you own a Kidde fire extinguisher, then be sure to check and see whether it is one of the 134 models being recalled due to failure to discharge.

The recall is for Kidde fire extinguishers with plastic handles. The fire extinguishers can become clogged or require excessive force to discharge and can fail to activate during a fire emergency. In addition, the nozzle can detach with enough force to pose an impact hazard.

This recall involves two styles of Kidde fire extinguishers: plastic handle fire extinguishers and push-button Pindicator fire extinguishers.

The plastic handle fire extinguishers encompasses 134 models of Kidde fire extinguishers manufactured between January 1, 1973 and August 15, 2017, including models that were previously recalled in March 2009 and February 2015. The extinguishers were sold in red, white and silver, and are either ABC- or BC-rated. The model number is printed on the fire extinguisher label. For units produced in 2007 and beyond, the date of manufacture is a 10-digit date code printed on the side of the cylinder, near the bottom.  Digits five through nine represent the day and year of manufacture in DDDYY format. Date codes for recalled models manufactured from January 2, 2012 through August 15, 2017 are 00212 through 22717.  For units produced before 2007, a date code is not printed on the fire extinguisher.

Push-button Pindicator fire extinguishers: The recall involves eight models of Kidde Pindicator fire extinguishers manufactured between August 11, 1995 and September 22, 2017. The no-gauge push-button extinguishers were sold in red and white, and with a red or black nozzle. These models were sold primarily for kitchen and personal watercraft applications.

Consumers should immediately contact Kidde to request a free replacement fire extinguisher and for instructions on returning the recalled unit, as it may not work properly in a fire emergency.

The firm is aware of a 2014 death involving a car fire following a crash. Emergency responders could not get the recalled Kidde fire extinguishers to work. There have been approximately 391 reports of failed or limited activation or nozzle detachment, including the fatality, approximately 16 injuries, including smoke inhalation and minor burns, and approximately 91 reports of property damage.

The products were sold at Menards, Montgomery Ward, Sears, The Home Depot, Walmart and other department, home and hardware stores nationwide, and online at Amazon.com, ShopKidde.com and other online retailers for between $12 and $50 and for about $200 for model XL 5MR. These fire extinguishers were also sold with commercial trucks, recreational vehicles, personal watercraft and boats.

Consumers can contact Kidde toll-free at 855-271-0773 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET Saturday and Sunday, or online at www.kidde.com and click on “Product Safety Recall” for more information.

A complete list of the recalled products is available on https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2018/Kidde-Recalls-Fire-Extinguishers-with-Plastic%20Handles-Due-to-Failure-to-Discharge-and-Nozzle-Detachment-One-Death-Reported

 

Parenting

Happy Halloween!

2:00

It’s that time of year as goblins, ghouls, super-heroes, pirates and princesses make their way through neighborhoods with outstretched hands and shy giggles.  Yep, Halloween is here!

While little ones concentrate on having fun, parents can help make this traditional holiday safer.

Candy check:

·      Children shouldn’t snack on treats from their goody bags while they’re out trick-or-treating. Give them a light meal or snack before they head out – don’t send them out on an empty stomach. Urge them to wait until they get home and let you inspect their loot before they eat any of it.

·      Tell children not to accept – and especially not to eat – anything that isn’t commercially wrapped. Inspect commercially wrapped treats for signs of tampering, such as an unusual appearance or discoloration, tiny pinholes, or tears in wrappers. Throw away anything that looks suspicious.

·      If your child has a food allergy, check the label to ensure the allergen isn’t present. Do not allow the child to eat any home-baked goods he or she may have received.

·      If you have very young children, be sure to remove any choking hazards such as gum, peanuts, hard candies, or small toys.

Preventing fires and burns:

·      Select flame retardant materials when buying or making costumes.

·      Choose battery-operated candles and lights instead of open-flame candles.

Good visibility:

·      Make sure your child can see clearly where they are going and can be seen.

·      Trim costumes or clothing with reflective tape. Many costumes are dark in color and can’t easily be seen by car drivers.

·      Give your child a small flashlight or glow stick to carry with them if they are trick- or- treating after dusk.

Pumpkin Carving: Carving pumpkins is traditional in many families and while the results can be stunning, great care needs to be taken when children are involved. 

·      Small children should never carve pumpkins. Children can draw a face with markers. Then parents can do the cutting.

·      Consider using a flashlight or glow stick instead of a candle to light your pumpkin. If you do use a candle, a votive candle is safest.

·      Candlelit pumpkins should be placed on a sturdy table, away from curtains and other flammable objects, and should never be left unattended.

Costumes: Store bought costumes rarely fit properly, so you may need to make some adjustments.

·      Adjust costumes to ensure a good fit. Long skirts or capes can drag on the ground and cause falls.

·      Secure hats, scarves and masks to ensure that your child can see everything that is going on around them. Also, check to see that nothing is keeping your child from breathing properly. Masks and some super-hero helmets can fir too tightly, making it hard to breathe.

·      Make sure that swords, canes or sticks are not sharp.

Home safety:

·      To keep homes safe for visiting trick-or-treaters, parents should remove from the porch and front yard anything a child could trip over such as garden hoses, toys, bikes and lawn decorations.

·      Parents should check outdoor lights and replace burned-out bulbs.

·      Wet leaves or snow should be swept from sidewalks and steps.

·      Restrain pets so they do not inadvertently jump on or bite a trick-or-treater.

An adult should always accompany young children. When your child is about ten, they may start asking to go with their friends. There are some questions to think about before you decide to let them go out on their own:

·      What is your child’s maturity level? Do they normally act pretty responsible and make good choices?

·      Who are the friends they want to go with and what is their maturity level?

·      What area are they going to be trick-or-treating in?  Will it be local or in an area your child may not be familiar with?

·      What time to they plan to start and be back home? Give your child a definite time.

Colored contacts have become popular with some older children. Often the packets these contacts come in have advertising on the package claiming that, “One size fits all.” They don’t.  These lenses are illegal in some states, but can be found online. They may cause pain, inflammation, and serious eye infections. Avoid these at all costs.

Whether your child is with you - or out with friends - make sure someone has a charged cell phone with them.  You want be prepared in case of an emergency.

Halloween has changed over the years and lots of parents now take their children to specific places that host Halloween parties and activities, but whether it’s in a controlled environment or out on the streets, it’s still smart to keep safety first.

Sources: https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/news-features-and-safety-tips/pages/Halloween-Safety-Tips.aspx

 Dr. Karen Sherman, http://www.hitchedmag.com/article.php?id=365

https://www.fda.gov/food/resourcesforyou/consumers/ucm187021.htm

 

 

 

Parenting

Helping Kids Cope With Tragic Events

2:00

Another all too common tragedy has saddened the hearts of Americans this week. Just 35 days after a man opened fire on a crowd of concertgoers in Las Vegas, killing 58 people and wounding nearly 500 others, another mass killing has taken place. This time in the small community of Sutherland Springs, Texas, leaving 26 people dead and 10 critically injured.  About half of the victims were children, according to news reports. This follows a terrorist attack in New York City on Halloween that killed 8 people. The heartbreak and numbers are gut wrenching to think about.

These kinds of horrific events can make the world seem like a terrifying place, particularly for kids.

How can you help your child cope with such frightening news? As a parent or a caregiver, how you react can have a strong impact on how your child views his or her own safety.

Dr. Jennifer Caudle, an associate professor at Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Stratford, suggests that parents shield their children from news reports.

"Children may become upset by news coverage," Caudle said. So monitor and limit what they see, hear or read. This may reduce their anxiety and help them deal with these unsettling events, she explained.

Other suggestions include:

  • Ask your child what they have already heard about the event. 
  • Provide the facts but try not to make judgments about the situation. 
  • Avoid upsetting details, and reassure children that people are working hard to make things better for everyone. 
  • Don't pressure kids to talk about the events, but encourage them to share their feelings by talking, drawing or writing. 
  • Let children know they can come to you for information and that they are free to ask questions. 
  • Remind children that their home is a safe place. 
  • Let children know that people may react differently to hard-to-understand events.

If your child or adolescent seems to be obsessing over the events and is having a hard time putting things in perspective, they may need professional help. 

"Problems with sleeping, changes in appetite or behavior, mood changes and new physical complaints, such as stomach aches and headaches, could -- in some children -- be a sign that they are having a difficult time coping," she said. "If this is the case, make sure your child sees a health care professional."

The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) says that it is important to let your child know that you will do your best to take care of him or her, that you love them and it’s okay for them to feel upset or sad.

NIMH also offers these tips:

  • If your child is having trouble sleeping give them extra attention, let them sleep with a light on, or let them sleep in your room (for a short time).
  • Try to keep normal routines, for example, reading bedtime stories, eating dinner together, watching TV together, reading books, exercising, or playing games.

Unfortunately, these types of tragedies don’t appear to being going away anytime soon. But, you can help your child (and yourself) by reminding them that although there are some people that might want to inflict harm on others, most people are loving and kind. They want a safe place for children to grow up in and they are doing their best to make this world a better place.

Story sources: Mary Elizabeth Dallas, https://consumer.healthday.com/mental-health-information-25/child-psychology-news-125/helping-children-cope-when-a-mass-tragedy-strikes-728263.html

https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/helping-children-and-adolescents-cope-with-violence-and-disasters-parents/index.shtml

Parenting

Mumps Reach 10 Year High; Hitting Colleges and Kids Hard

1:45

Mumps are making a comeback, particularly on college campuses and in daycare centers.

A recent U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report shows that mumps are at a 10-year high. As of November, 45 states and the District of Columbia had reported a total of 2,879 mumps infections — more than double the mumps cases reported in 2015.

Mumps is a contagious disease caused by a virus. Common symptoms can include swollen glands in front of and below the ear or under the jaw, pain with opening and closing the jaw, fever, fatigue and malaise, headache and earache.

Currently, college campuses are taking the brunt of the mumps outbreak.

Dr. Michael Grosso, medical director and CMO of Huntington Hospital/Northwell Health, said close quarters such as dormitory living, can make it easier to pick up the virus.

“It’s spread through respiratory secretions, coughing, sneezing, close contact and sharing the same cups and utensils,” Grosso told CBS News.

Some colleges, such as The University of Missouri’s Columbia, are asking students to restrict their social activities and to make sure they get immunized. Typically, two doses of vaccine are recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the CDC, but the school is asking students to get a third measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine “based on discussions with public health officials and consistent with guidance from The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.”

College students aren’t the only ones being hit hard by mumps; younger children are also experiencing a rise in reported cases. More parents have opted-out of getting their children the MMR vaccine - putting non-immunized children at a higher risk.

Daycare centers are similar to college dormitories in that they provide an environment where a virus can be easily spread.

While most mumps cases are mild, albeit, uncomfortable, others can be more serious.

“Most individuals recover uneventfully from mumps, however as many as 10 percent of males who get mumps will get an inflammation of the testes which can lead to permanent sterility,” Grosso said.

The brain can also be affected. About 1 percent of people who come down with the mumps get serious brain infections and can experience meningitis, encephalitis and deafness associated with a brain infection.

“That small risk was behind the original impetus to create a vaccine,” Grosso said.

 Physicians are urging students to get the immunizations and to practice good hygiene. Simple steps such as covering your cough or sneeze, washing your hands with soap and water or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer, avoiding sharing food, drinks, cups or utensils can help prevent the spread of viruses.

Vaccines are still the most effective way to lower your risk of getting the mumps.  No vaccine is a 100 percent protective, Grosso notes, but it can help you avoid the risk of serious illness and lifelong health issues.

“Receiving two doses of mumps vaccines is said to confer about an 88 percent reduction in risk of getting mumps if you’re exposed,” said Grosso. A third dose may increase those odds.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the first dose of MMR vaccine should be administered between 12 and 15 months of age, and the second dose between 4 to 6 years of age.

Grosso emphasizes that parents need to get their children vaccinated early.

“Being immunized late is better than not being immunized ever. But being immunized late is not nearly as good as being immunized on time,” Grosso said.

Story sources: Mary Brophy Marcus, http://www.cbsnews.com/news/mumps-cases-10-year-high-college-outbreaks-vaccination/

https://www.cdc.gov/mumps/

Parenting

Uterus Transplant May Bring Hope to Women That Cannot Get Pregnant

1:45

The first U.S. uterus transplant at the Cleveland Clinic may offer a future option for women who have Uterine Factor Infertility (UFI).  UFI includes women who had had a hysterectomy, fibroids or scarring and cannot get pregnant. The revolutionary procedure may also give hope to women with a rare genetic syndrome called Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH).

MRKH syndrome, which occurs in 1 in 4,500 newborn girls, is a disorder that affects the reproductive system and can cause the vagina and uterus to be underdeveloped or absent from birth, according to the National Institutes of health.

“Women who are coping with UFI have few existing options,” Dr. Tommaso Falcone, an obstetrician-gynecologist and Cleveland Clinic Women’s Health Institute chairman, said in a statement last year. “Although adoption and surrogacy provide opportunities for parenthood, both pose logistical challenges and may not be acceptable due to personal, cultural or legal reasons.”

Dr. Jennifer Ashton, ABC News' Chief Women's Health Correspondent and board-certified obstetrician and gynecologist, said the uterus transplant was a major breakthrough in women's health and huge advance for helping women with MRKH.

"The really important thing for this story is it speaks to the incredibly powerful drive that some woman have to carry their own baby," Ashton said. "Even though uterine surrogacy is legal in the U.S. for some women, it’s not enough, it’s not the same thing. This is, I think, a really exciting important step for women’s health in this country."

While this is the first time the surgery has been performed in the U.S., nine women in Sweden have had the operation and four of those women have now given birth.

There is a wait time between the surgery and when a woman should start trying to conceive.  Women who receive the transplant will likely have to take anti-rejection drugs for a long time to ensure the procedure is successful. The Cleveland Clinic transplant was performed with a uterus from a deceased organ donor.

The hospital says that it is continuing to screen possible transplant candidates. For more information on the procedure you can check out the Cleveland Clinic website  at http://my.clevelandclinic.org/services/uterus-transplant.

In vitro fertilization and insemination was also considered revolutionary when the first “test tube” baby was born in 1978. Now, these procedures are commonplace for couples having difficulty conceiving.  It will be interesting to see how the uterine transplant changes future options.

Story source: Gillian Mohney, http://abcnews.go.com/Health/uterus-transplant-us-hope-women-rare-condition/story?id=37224525

Alexandria Sifferlin, http://time.com/4238596/uterus-transplant-cleveland-clinic/

 

Parenting

Should You Take the Kids "Black Friday" Shopping?

2:00

The day after Thanksgiving is one of the busiest shopping days of the year. It’s come to be known as “Black Friday;” a day where deals can definitely be found.

In some places, it has become more like a scene from the movie “Fight Club” than a shopping spree. There seems to have developed a need so great for the cheapest electronics and clothes that people are willing to fight, push and steal from each other to get them.

So, should you take your kids with you if you’re planning on doing a little shopping on this unruly day?  The short answer is no. However, if you find yourself in a situation that it’s either the kids go, or there is no holiday shopping to be had, then do some planning ahead of time to prepare.

If there is anyway possible to avoid taking a newborn into a crowd of grabbing hands, shoving elbows and long lines – not to mention the germs- please do it.  Newborns will be the most vulnerable and will demand all of your attention. If you do take a baby with you, make sure you have a partner who can help with your baby’s care and safety.

In an article on The Penny Hoarder, author Nicole Dieker, reached out to Rosemarie Groner, a mother of two and owner of the Busy Budgeter blog, for tips on how to successfully navigate Black Friday with the kids.

Groner shares her thoughts and suggestions on the topic.

Though not typically recommended, this may be the day when giving your little one unlimited screen time on a tablet or cell phone is warranted. An all-day shopping trip becomes more fun for the kids when there is a digital distraction to keep them occupied.

It’s also a good idea to pack small toys to keep kids entertained, and Groner suggests packing special toys that kids don’t usually get to play with. 

It’s also possible to buy new toys to increase the delight/distraction factor – just make sure the new ones are within your budget.

Packing your kids’ favorite snacks is another great way to delight and distract. The kids get their favorite goodies — and yes, this is the time to pull out those special-occasion treats — and you also save money by not having to buy snacks at the food court. 

“Packing a cooler full of drinks, sandwiches and portable snacks like Go-Gurt, trail mix and chips can help you avoid the high cost of eating out,” Groner explained. It’ll also help you keep the kids happy, fed and hydrated so you can keep shopping. A small roll around cart is essential for keeping everything you’ll need portable.

What about those famous Door-busters? Should you tackle those? Many stores have moved the open door time for these super-shopping events to Midnight or 1:00 AM. Some people even camp out in front of the store hoping they will be the first ones through the doors.

Groner suggests you skip it. “Unless I could save several hundred dollars on something I would have bought anyway, I would skip the frustrations involved in that. I can’t think of anything that I could get to make camping outside of a store with kids overnight worth it.” If you feel left out on great deals – look for the same items online on Cyber Monday. Shop in your pajamas with a cup of coffee, from your own home instead!

If Black Friday shopping is still calling your name, shop in teams. If you’ve got another parent, relative or friend available to shop with you, use the power of teamwork.

“It’s a great idea to team up with another adult,” Groner said. “That would give you both a chance to break away for a few minutes kid-free to grab something while the other handles the kids.”

With two adults, you also have someone available to take kids to the bathroom, sit with them as they eat a snack and help entertain them when they get bored.

If you have a small child, consider using a well-made child harness to make sure your little one doesn’t disappear in the crowd.

Black Friday shopping has become a sport for those who are free to move about easily, have plenty of stamina and little distraction. If you’re the parent of small kids, online shopping may be just the ticket for your holiday gifts.

Story source: Nicole Dieker, https://www.thepennyhoarder.com/life/how-to-survive-black-friday-shopping-with-your-kids/

 

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