Twitter Facebook RSS Feed Print
Daily Dose

Don't Let Your Child Become an Obesity Statistic

Healthy eating begins with the first foods that you feed your infant.An alarming statistic was released today which shows that one in five 4-year-old children are obese and these numbers are even higher in minority children. This study was just published in The Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, and followed over 8,000 children looking at height and weight. The findings were quite concerning, showing a trend toward obesity at an age younger than predicted, and numerous long term health problems associated with obesity, such as heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and bone and joint problems.

This is a national health issue and a call to action for all families to teach and model healthy eating. One of the problems is that many of the government sponsored food programs provide foods high in carbohydrates, and low in fresh fruits and vegetables, and this promotes obesity. School lunches have also been found to be high in fat and carbohydrate and continue to promote poor food choices. With the bad economy and recession, families have cut back on groceries and may be eating more fast foods, breads and pastas, again providing more carbohydrate than protein. Healthy eating begins with the first foods that you feed your infant. A well balanced diet with grains, fruits, vegetables and meats begins in the high chair and should continue at the family dinner table. The meals may be simple and healthy. Being a short order cook, or providing your child's favorite pizza and fried food on a daily basis, even in a young toddler will have deleterious effects for the rest of their life. Don't let your child become a statistic heading toward lifelong health issues secondary to childhood obesity. Change your own eating habits, improve your children's and remain committed to family meals. We, as parents, cannot afford to raise a generation where obesity is the norm: the change must begin now. That's your daily dose, we'll chat again tomorrow. More Information: 1 in 5 Preschoolers Obese

Daily Dose

When To Worry About Stuttering

1.15 to read

I received an e-mail today from a mother who is concerned about her 2 1/2 year old daughter who has started stuttering in the last week. She asked ”is this something to be worried about or just watch it and see?”

This is a common question from parents with preschool aged children, and is typically most frequent between 18 months and five years of age. Stuttering at this age is called disfluency or pseudo stuttering and is quite common as children learn to speak and develop more complex speech patterns.

In many cases the stuttering occurs out of the blue, and may last for several weeks, and resolve, but may return off and on during the preschool years as a child is learning more and more language. In a preschooler who is stuttering the parents usually note that the child repeats an initial sound such as l-li-like or s-st-star or may have frequent pauses with “um” and “er”. It is not uncommon to see this happen when a child is excited, or anxious or tired.

They may stumble or words or sounds and after a good night’s rest you may see an improvement. They often don’t seem to realize that they are even stuttering as their brains and mouth try to keep up with one another. Remember they have a lot to say!

The best medicine for stuttering is for a parent to reassure their child that it is okay to slow down as sometimes it is hard to make the words correctly. A hug from Mom or Dad while they are reassuring their child is also helpful. Practice slow and relaxed speech when you are talking to your child and try not to rush them when they are talking, even if the stuttering is bothering you. When your child asks you a question, pause before answering to also model behaviors with speaking. Reading aloud with your child in a slow and normal manner is also beneficial (I remember nights of trying to rush through those early books to try and get everyone in bed!).

The best person to emulate is Mr. Rogers, think of how relaxed he always was when speaking. He never seemed as if he was hurrying for anything! In most cases a child’s stuttering will not last more than weeks to several months and will resolve on its own.

If you think the problem is increasing in severity or is causing stress and anxiety for your child it may be time for a discussion with your pediatrician.

Do you have any tips?  Feel free to share them with us!

Daily Dose

Why Babies Get "Goop" In Their Eyes

1:15 to read

If you have recently had a baby you may already know about “clogged tear ducts”. This is also named nasal lacrimal duct obstruction and is fairly common in newborn infants in the first weeks to months of life.

A baby’ s tear duct, the tiny little hole in the inner corner of the eye, is very small and narrow and may often get obstructed. If that is the case the tears that an infant makes gets backed up and may form a thickened “goopy” discharge in the eye. At times when this occurs the baby’s eye will seem to be “glued” shut as the goop gets in the eyelashes and almost seems to cement those little eyes shut. Occasionally the eye will look a little puffy due to the debris in the eye. The best thing to do for this problem is to use a warm compress or cotton ball dampened with warm water to wipe the eyelashes and remove the discharge from the eye.

Once the “goop” is removed and your baby opens their eye, look at the whites (conjuctiva) of the eye. The conjunctiva should not appear to be red or inflamed. The goop will re-accumulate over time, but the eye itself should continue to look clear. Babies with clogged tear ducts do not appear to be ill and continue to eat well. The only problem should be the goopy eye. In order to help open the clogged duct you can try to massage the inner lower corner of the baby’s eye (beneath the tear duct itself), several times a day. Gently apply pressure to the area and do this several times a day. The eye “goop” always seems to be worse after the baby has been sleeping. It is also not uncommon for one eye to clear up only to have the other eye develop “goop”.  Most of these obstructions resolve on its own by four to six months of age. If the tear duct continues to be obstructed, talk to your pediatrician about a possible referral to the pediatric ophthalmologist.

That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow.

Daily Dose

Treating Scabies

There has been an outbreak of scabies recently. Here's how to treat it.I received an email via our iPhone App from a mother whose 6 year old son had scabies and had been treated two times with permethrin cream, but had just had another re-occurrence.  She wondered if there were any other options for treatment.

Scabies is a mite that causes an eczematous skin rash with associated horrible itching. Infestation with the scabies mite is the result of skin to skin contact.  The mite burrows beneath the skin and the feces of the mite causes an allergic hypersensitivity reaction with resulting skin inflammation and itching. It can be fairly miserable when it goes on for awhile. (Once again my own son had it 20 years ago and that was actually one of the first times I had seen the rash of scabies and it took 3 different doctors including an allergist to finally diagnose it! ). It is sometimes easily diagnosed as a child will have a classic rash on their, trunk, arms and legs, and may even has the classic burrow tract of the mite between their toes and fingers. At other times scabies can be a great masquerader and the diagnosis may be made by scraping the skin and looking at it under the microscope where the actual mite or mite parts may be seen. If in doubt it is always a good idea to do a scraping. The time from infestation with the mite to actually symptoms may be as long as 6 weeks. During this time the “index” case in a family harbors the mites and are infectious, but they may not yet be symptomatic with the typical rash of scabies. When you diagnose a child with scabies the most important thing to do is to not only treat the child but treat the entire family unit.  Because the mite has such a long infectious incubation period it is important to treat all family members at the same time.  The standard treatment is with 5% permethrin cream, which is typically applied at night to all body surfaces from neck to toes. (do not bath before putting on the cream as this will help reduce the systemic absorption of the medicine). Make sure to get the cream between the web spaces of the fingers and toes.  The cream is left on over night (remember entire family) and then washed off in the am.  The next day I would wash all of the clothes and sheets in hot water.  If there are clothing that will not tolerate this put them in a platic bag for 72 hours (which is the life span of the mite off of the body). Even after a patient is successfully treated the itching may continue for several more days and may be treated with topical steroid cream (Cortaid over the counter or a prescription steroid cream).  What you will notice is that while the intense itching is diminishing, there are no NEW areas of rash. Most treatment failures seem to be due to not applying the cream with attention to complete coverage,  or to not treating the entire family at the same time. Another medication Lindane (Kwell) has been used to treat scabie,  but has been associated with the potential for neurotoxicity and is rarely prescribed, especially for younger children. There is also an antiparasitic medication, Ivermectin that is currently being studied for the treatment of scabies. That's your daily dose for today.  We'll chat again tomorrow. Send your question to Dr. Sue!

Daily Dose

Parent-Teacher Conference Time

It is that time of year when parents have the privilege of meeting with their children's teachers to discuss academic progress and the fall semester.Now that I have finished doing homework with the younger set, I have returned to the office and ALL of my 27 messages are related to school conferences. It is that time of year when parents have the privilege of meeting with their children's teachers to discuss academic progress and the fall semester. From preschool through high school, conferences are in full swing. I loved getting to sit down with my children's teachers to discuss their progress and really to compare notes, parent to teacher, as to how our boys were progressing in school. You may have heard me say that I believed in the "no news is good news" perspective, and did not call the school etc, unless summoned.

But conferences really are a time of gathering information and discussing this information with your children, whether there is good news or "bad" news to discuss. This is the time of year when attention issues seem to become evident. It may be inattention, impulsivity, excessive talking, lack of focus or incomplete work, but all of these problems deal with attention. Many younger children may be in their first classroom and are still adjusting to a full day of school, following directions, and completing work. But, if you child has been in school and is not showing maturation on these fronts, and teachers continue to discuss your child's attention, focus and concentration, it is important to follow up with your pediatrician. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is common in up to 10 - 15% of children of school age and is usually diagnosed in elementary school. If your child has symptoms suggestive of attention issues, call your pediatrician to discuss further workup and evaluation, beginning with teachers and parents rating scales. It is important to note any concerns with your doctor and to continue evaluating your child as needed. Remember, there are more conferences in the spring, and this is a good time to set goals with your child. That's your daily dose, we'll chat tomorrow.

Daily Dose

White Patches on the Skin

1:30 to read

I saw a 10 year old patient last week for her routine physical. One of her mother’s concerns was that her daughter had “white patches” under both of her arms.  Once I examined her I told her mother that the “white patches” were actually due to Vitiligo, which is an acquired disorder of pigment loss. 

Vitiligo is caused by a reduction in functional melanocytes, the cells that cause pigmentation in the skin. Vitiligo often develops before the age of 20 and there is no difference in predilection for male over female cases.  In children the hypopigmented areas are often first noted on sun exposed areas like the face (around the eyes and mouth) and well as on the hands.  The underarm area (axilla) is often involved, as are areas around the genitalia. In many cases the depigmentation is symmetrical (both arm pits, or hands or knees). 

Although the exact cause of Vitiligo is not clear, it is known that it has an immunogenetic basis, as there is a positive family history of others with vitiligo in 30 -40 % of patients. There are numerous theories as to different reasons that the melanocytes (pigment cells) are not working. The genetics of vitiligo is also being studied with changes seen on certain chromosomes. 

So why doctors are not clear as to how and why Vitiligo occurs, in most cases it does seem to be slowly progressive. There is spontaneous repigmentation in 10-20% of patients, especially in sun exposed areas of young patients. 

The problem with Vitiligo is that treatment is often lengthy and is frequently unrewarding. There is not “one way” to treat Vitiligo that will ensure repigmentation and resolution. Dermatologists have used phototherapy for treatment, but facial areas and small patches seem to be most responsive. A recent study showed that narrow band UVB therapy was superior to UVA therapy, but studies continue. 

Potent topical corticosteroids are also used to help promote re-pigmentation.  Topical immune modulators such as Tacrolimus have also been tried. 

With all of this being said, a referral to a dermatologist that is familiar with treating Vitiligo is of upmost importance. The sooner the treatment for these “white patches” the better. 

That’s your daily dose for today.  We’ll chat again tomorrow. 

Daily Dose

How to Treat Croup

1.15 to read

Now that the weather seems to change daily, croup season is here. Have you heard the sounds of raspy, throaty voices in your house lately? This "noise" is ushering in croup season! Croup is an infection that causes swelling of the larynx (vocal box) and trachea (windpipe) that in turn makes the airway just beneath the vocal cords become swollen and narrow. When you have swelling and narrowing of the airway breathing becomes more difficult and noisy and the sound that is made, almost like that of a seal barking, is called being “croupy”. Croup is quite common in young children, but the sound the emanates from that child when they cough, can be scary and concerning for both parent and child. Children are most likely to get croup between the ages of six months and three years. As a child gets older croup is not as common as the trachea gets larger with age and therefore the swelling does not cause as much compromise. When you awaken in the middle of the night to hear your child “barking” in the next room you need to know what to do. Most croup is caused by a common virus, so croup is not treated with antibiotics. The mainstay for the treatment of croup is try and calm you child, as they may be scared both from the tight feeling in their chest, as well as the sound that is made when they are breathing and coughing. The best treatment for croup seems to be taking your child into the bathroom and turning the shower on hot. Let the steam from the hot water fill the room and sit in there and read a book or two to your child. Typically within five to 10 minutes (before the hot water runs out) the moist hot air should help your child’s breathing. They may still have the barking, croupy cough, but they should be more comfortable and will not look like they are having trouble breathing. If the moist steam does not work, and it is a cool fall night, go outside. That is right, taking your “croupy” child from the moist heat in the bathroom, outside to cool night air may also help open their airways. If your child is showing signs of respiratory distress, with color change with coughing (turning blue while coughing, red is always good), is retracting (using their chest muscles between the ribs to help them breath), is grunting with each breath, or seems quite anxious and having trouble breathing you should call for emergency help. If a child is having real difficulty breathing they may be admitted to the hospital to have supplemental oxygen or breathing treatments. Steroids have also been helpful when used for the correct patient population. Steroids may be used in both an outpatient and inpatient setting. Steroids help to reduce inflammation in the trachea and the symptoms lessen over several days. Steroids used in a short burst are not harmful to your child, and are indicated in a child who may have mild respiratory distress due their croup symptoms. Your child may have symptoms of croup for several days, and for some reason they always seem to be worse at night. Put your child to bed with a cool mist humidifier in their room for the next several nights, this will also help to provide moisture to their airway. It is not uncommon for some children to seem more “prone to croup” and may get it recurrently all fall and winter. Have the humidifier handy and in working order! That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow. Send your question or comment to Dr. Sue!

Daily Dose

Get Your Baby to Sleep!

1:30 to read

How many times can you discuss newborns and getting them to sleep? It doesn’t matter how many babies you have, the biggest issue for new parents is ”when is my baby going to sleep through the night?”.  This statement is often followed by, “I have read every book and none of it seems to be working”. “What’s the trick?”  

Over the years I have realized that there is “NOT” one way or method that makes that newborn sleep through the night.  While some babies seem to lull themselves to sleep fairly easily and are sleeping in the first 4-6 weeks, most infants still awaken during the night for the first 8-12 weeks. There are also the “difficult” infants who don’t sleep through the night until 4- 6 months. But all in all...it just takes time, patience and a bit of prayer.

So, with all of this knowledge and remembering how I longed for my own babies to sleep 8-10 hours at night, I found a new article in The Archives of Diseases and Children quite interesting and thought provoking.  

Physicians have long known that it takes some time for circadian rhythm (biological sleep patterns distinguishing day and night) to develop in babies and a study done in the UK actually looked at infant’s sleep patterns between 6-18 weeks of age. They analyzed data including the infants’ body temperature throughout the night,  length of sleep a d urine samples collected am and pm to look at cortisol and melatonin levels. They also looked at the babies’ cheek swabs for circadian gene expression.  All in all a lot of data.

The findings were interesting showing that increasing cortisol secretion at night occurred around 8.2 weeks of age, followed in the next week or two by increased melatonin at night....both integral to establishing circadian rhythm.

When they analyzed body temperature, a drop in core temperature at the beginning of sleep (again maturational) they found that this occurred around 10-11 weeks.  Lastly, mature circadian gene expression was found at about 11 weeks.

So, no matter what book you read, or what your pediatrician, best friend or your own mother tells you, it is all about those hormones starting to “wake up” and regulate sleep. 

At least you know your baby is “normal”, even when everyone on Facebook “SWEARS” that their baby slept all night in the first 2 weeks. They probably either have totally forgotten or just made it up...it is all about science after all.

Tags: 
Daily Dose

Asthmatic Kids & Colds

2.00 to read

Cold season continues to hang on and for anyone who has a child with asthma, you are aware that wheezing will often accompany winter colds.

I have spent a lot of time in the last week listening to wheezy chest, lots of coughing and seeing many children who need to be using their asthma medications. After a quiet summer of no coughing it is a good time to review asthma and the medications to use to treat as “wheezy season” is here!

Many children will wheeze once in their lifetime and I tell parents, “everyone gets one free wheezing episode”. But if a child wheezes on several occasions and responds to bronchodilators they probably have asthma. If you throw in a positive family history of wheezing as well as wheezing that begins each time a child gets a cold it is time to discuss the diagnosis of asthma and the treatments that go along with the diagnosis.

The good news about asthma is that there are a lot of great medications available for treatment. With that being said I think it is important to teach parents about the pathophysiology of asthma and then talk about treatment. I tell my patients/parents that understanding wheezing is somewhat analogous to being a medical intern. You have to see the symptoms for a while and then you finally “learn it, and know it” and then can begin to understand treatment.

For a parent with a child with asthma it is the same process. Each repeated wheezing episode should get easier for a parent to know what they are dealing with and when and how to start treatment. Many times they will not need the doctor to be involved once they are comfortable with the medications.

In fairly simplistic terms, there are really two components to asthma, airway narrowing (brochospasm) and airway inflammation. In most cases it is important to be treating both symptoms. The most common trigger for asthma in children is a viral upper respiratory infection. When you get a viral upper respiratory infection the virus causes airway inflammation and irritation in all of us. That is one reason we all cough with a cold.

For an asthmatic child it also causes bronchospasm and resultant wheezing. By the time you audibly hear your child wheezing they are what we pediatricians refer to as “being tight”. The goal is therefore to treat the asthmatic episode early and aggressively; you never want to hear audible wheezing.

An asthmatic cough is often short, frequent, non productive and occurs throughout the day and often all night long. I love to walk into a room and hear a child with a productive, “phlegmy” cough, as these children are typically not wheezers but are good coughers! It is that dry little recurrent pesky cough that occurs incessantly that is often the hallmark of a child who is wheezing.

In severe cases of wheezing and bronchospasm the child will also show signs of respiratory distress, where their chest may show retractions (pulling in between ribs) or using their abdominal muscles to help them breath. These children look uncomfortable and are usually not running around the exam room as they are having a hard time getting air exchanged.

Some other children may not be in any respiratory distress but when listened to with the stethoscope you can hear the high pitched noise on expiration and sometimes on inspiration as well. You just have to get used to listening. Practice, practice and then a parent with a stethoscope gets better at understanding asthma.

When a child is actively wheezing it is time to start medications to relieve their symptoms. More on treatment coming.  Stay tuned.

Pages

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

Why it's so important to read to/with your kids every day.

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.