Daily Dose

Babies & Bow-Legs

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Fact or fiction: if a young baby puts any weight on their legs they'll become bow legged? Dr. Sue weighs in.I’m sure you have noticed, babies like to stand up! With that being said, I still hear parents coming into my office who say, “I am scared to let my baby stand up as my mother (grandmother, father, uncle) tells me that letting a baby put weight on their legs will cause bow-legs!  How is it possible that this myth is still being passed on to the next generation?

If you look at a baby’s legs it is easy to see how they were “folded” so that they fit inside the uterus. Those little legs don’t get “unfolded” until after delivery. A newborn baby’s legs continue to stay bent for awhile and you can easily “re-fold” those legs to see how your baby was positioned in utero. Almost like doing origami. So, how do those little bent legs get straight?  From bearing weight. If you hold a 3-5 month old baby upright they will instinctively put their feet down and bear weight.  A 4 month old likes nothing more than to jump up and down while being held. They will play the “jumping game” until you become exhausted. That little exercise is the beginning of remolding the bones of the leg, while straightening the bones. If you look at most toddlers many do appear bow-legged as the bones have not had long enough to straighten. Over the next several years you will notice that most children no longer appear bow legged. For most children the bow legs have resolved by the age of 5 years. I child’s final gait and shape of their legs is really determined by about the age of 7 years. Next time you hear the adage about bow legs, you can politely correct the myth. Standing up is going to make that baby have straight legs! That’s your daily dose for today.  We’ll chat again tomorrow.

Daily Dose

What Are Breast Buds?

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I received a phone call today from a mother who was worried about the “bump” beneath her 12 year old daughter’s nipple. I do get this phone call quite often and even see mothers and daughters in the office who are concerned about this lump?  First thought is often, “is this breast cancer?”  The answer is a resounding “NO” but rather a breast bud.  While all mothers developed their own breast buds in years past, many have either forgotten or suppressed the memory of early puberty and breast budding.

Breast buds are small lumps the size of a blueberry or marble that “erupt” directly beneath a young girl’s areola and nipple. Most girls experience breast budding somewhere around 10-12 years of age although it may happen a bit sooner or even later. It is one of the early signs of puberty and estrogen effects.

Many girls will complain that the nipple area is sore and tender and that they are lopsided!! It is not unusual for one side to “sprout” before the other. Sometimes one breast will bud and the other is months behind. All of this is normal. 

While a lump in the breast is concerning in women reassure your daughter that this is not breast cancer (happy that they are so aware) but a normal part of body changes that happen to all girls as they enter adolescence.   Breast budding does not mean that their period is around the corner either, and periods usually start at least 2 years after breast budding (often longer).

Breast buds have also been known to come and go, again not to worry. But at some point the budding will actually progress to breast development and the continuing changes of the breast during puberty.

Reassurance is really all you need and if your daughter is self-conscious this is a good time to start them wearing a light camisole of “sports bra.”  

Daily Dose

Skin Lesion: Staph or Pimple?

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I just received an email question from a teenager who happened to attach a picture of a skin lesion she was worried about. I think it is great that teens are being proactive about their health and are asking questions about issues that are concerning to them.  BRAVO!!

So, this “bump” sounds like it started out as a possible “zit” on this 16 year old girl’s neck.  She admitted to lots of “digging” into the lesion and then became concerned that it didn’t seem to be getting any better.  She said that friends told her that it could be scabies, or possibly staph.  Leave it to friends to make you more apprehensive about the mystery bump. Looking at the picture it looks like it could be a simple pimple and in that case the best medicine is to LEAVE IT ALONE. The hardest thing to get teens to do (and also adults) is not to pick at pimples or bumps on their bodies, as this could lead to a skin infection. Many times just washing the “zit” and leaving it alone, it will go away.  When you go “digging” into it you break the skin and allow bacteria to enter the now open wound and you can get a skin infection. 

In many cases this may be due to staph or strep from your hands.  This may sometimes require a topical or oral antibiotic to treat the infection, when it may have been something that should have been left alone. There are skin infections that we are seeing in the community that are due to MRSA (methicillin resistant staph) which have become quite frequent in the last several years. In this case that small “bump” usually arises quite quickly, often times it is confused with an insect bite. But very quickly the bump becomes more inflamed, tender and often quickly grows in size. Many times there will be drainage from the bump which now resembles a boil.  In my experience the hallmark of MRSA infections is how quickly they arise and how painful they are.  They have a fairly classic appearance (see old post on Staph).

MRSA infections often have to be drained and require different antibiotics than ”regular” skin infections. In most cases it is necessary to obtain a culture of the drainage so that the appropriate antibiotic may be selected. In some circumstances the infection is quite extensive and may even require surgical drainage and IV antibiotics, requiring a stay in the hospital.  MRSA is a serious infection and is often seen in teens who share articles of clothing or participate in sports where they are showering, using equipment etc that is shared. Remember to use your own towels, and athletic equipment when you can.

This teen also asked “if you have staph would you have it forever?” In actuality, many of us harbor staph in our noses and we all rub our noses throughout the day and then touch other parts of our body as well as other objects. This then passes the bacteria from person to person, sometimes via another object. If you are not symptomatic, don’t worry about whether you have staph in your nostrils, but do adhere to good hand washing and try to keep your hands away from your face. For patients who have had recurrent skin MRSA infections, I often prescribe an antibiotic cream to be put in the nostrils as well as in the nostrils of all close contacts (family members). I also recommend that the patient bath in an anti-bacterial soap and take a bleach bath every week to help decrease the bacterial colonization with staph. It seems that this has helped prevent reoccurrences of staph for the individual as well as for other family members. Lastly, this is certainly not scabies, but we have an older post on that too with pictures!

That’s your daily dose for today. We’ll chat again tomorrow. Send your question or comment to Dr. Sue!

Daily Dose

What is Stomach Flu?

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I have seen a lot of patients in recent weeks with complaints of “stomach flu”.  Just to be clear the “stomach flu” really is not FLU at all and has nothing to do with “flu/influenza”.  The stomach stuff is actually called gastroenteritis, and is typically caused by a virus.  If you have been watching the news, you have heard about yet another cruise ship where many passengers and crew have been sickened and the boat had to return to port. 

Most gastroenteritis causes vomiting, diarrhea, and stomach cramps.  It is pretty miserable.  The most common cause of the stomach “bug” is a virus called norovirus. Norovirus is now the most common cause of gastroenteritis in the United States. Rotavirus was previously the most common cause of viral gastroenteritis, but since the rotavirus vaccine has been introduced for infants, rotavirus has now been surpassed by norovirus.  Viruses are really smart, sneaky and strong (which is called virulent in medical terms). 

Norovirus makes you feel awful (who likes to vomit?)  and is very easy to pick up. Where it takes exposure to many viral particles to get sick from some viral illnesses, a recent study in The New England Journal of Medicine found that as few as 10-100 norovirus particles may cause disease. It is a very efficient virus and may even be acquired by breathing in the viral particles. (gross example, someone vomits and you are in the room and breathe the virus -  think about your child spewing vomit). 

Norovirus peaks in the 6-18 month old child. By 5 years of age 1 in 6 children will have seen their doctor for vomiting/diarrhea caused by norovirus. 

The key to combating norovirus is hydration.  The virus typically lasts several days with vomiting usually shorter than the diarrhea.  Treat vomiting with frequent sips of clear liquids and increase the volume of liquid over time. Once your child is tolerating liquids and vomiting has stopped you can let them eat. If your child is over the age of 1 year and diarrhea is a big problem, I would restrict dairy for a couple of days as well. Probiotics may help as well. 

Knowing that norovirus can be transmitted by hand to mouth as well, good hygiene is important....especially after the bathroom...so make sure those little hands are washed.

Daily Dose

College Students and Curfews

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Colleges are out and many students are home for the summer.  But with the return of your child to “the nest” comes a whole new set of issues. Trust me I have been there (more than once).

Your son or daughter has been living in a dorm, apartment, or house....with their own “rules and routines”.  Most college students living away from home have not had to really answer to anyone. If they want to stay up all night, come home at sunrise or sleep all day....you have not been involved. 

But now they are back....hopefully having managed to do well, despite their crazy schedules.  Does this “new normal” of theirs work at your house? It certainly didn’t in ours, especially where both parents were working.

A friend had advised me, “don’t give them a curfew over the summer , they have not had one at college”.  That may be some of the worse advice I have ever gotten!!  When your child is living in your house and you wake up at 2 am and they are not home....well, you assume the worst, right?  Then you try to call them and it goes to voice mail...of course...more worry. After one night like that pacing the floors I knew in my heart of hearts that summer rules, even for college kids are a must!

So, at our house college students (I don’t care how old), need to be respectful of house rules.  Even if they can get up and go to work after 3 hours of sleep, I can’t.  So midnight curfew, just like high school, goes back into place. Nothing good happens after midnight anyway, right?  If they want to stay up in their room or go watch TV in the den, or make a sandwich at 2 am, that is fine by me. I just want to know that they are home and I don’t have to dream about horrible events that are happening when I don’t know where they are.  They always ask, “you don’t know what I am doing when I am at school, so what’s the difference?”  The difference is , “out of sight, out of mind” (sort of).  In my mind I can imagine that they are tucked in their dorm bed at 10 pm.....I always think good thoughts. Those unsettling thoughts only come when they are home.... and that bed is empty.  

Daily Dose

Food Textures

1:30 to read

If you have a baby between the ages of 8-9 months and have already been offering them pureed baby foods it may be time to start some textures as well.  Many parents are a bit “wary” of offering any food that hasn’t been totally pureed, but it is important that your baby starts to experiment with foods that have different consistencies. 

Of course this does not mean you hand your baby anything that they could choke on like a grape, or piece of meat etc. But instead of totally pureeing carrots, why not cook them well, chop them up a bit and put them on the high chair tray. It is fun to watch how they touch and feel the carrots, before they “smoosh and moosh” them and get them to their mouths.   

There are so many foods that are easily offered to a baby to get them used to feeling different textures.  This is the very beginning of experimenting with finger foods, and this doesn’t just mean puffs or cheerios either. I like to encourage babies to feel cold, gooey, warm, sticky, all sorts of different textures which will ultimately help them become better and more adventuresome eaters as they get older.  

Unfortunately, I see far too many little ones (and not so little ones too) continuing to eat totally pureed foods and then becoming adverse to textures as they did not get the experience at an early enough age. 

It is also fun to watch your child as they begin to pick up foods that have been chopped and diced into small soft pieces. In the early stages they have to scoop and lick the food from their fingers and hands, but very quickly their pincer grasp takes over and suddenly they can pick up that well cooked green bean or pea!!  Such a feat and worthy of a home video to send to the grandparents for sure. 

So, put out some mushy food and let them play - I know it is messy but that is what being a kid is often about!

Daily Dose

It’s The Season For Bug Bites & Stings

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Children love to be outside in the spring and summer when the daylight is longer and the backyard, playground, or campsite can become a magical play space. Insect bites are bound to happen. Most are just an annoyance, but make sure you know which ones to be concerned about and which ones may just require a hug and a kiss.It’s that time of year when insect bites and stings start showing up on your kids. Knowing how to prevent and treat common insect bites and stings, and knowing when to not overreact, can help keep your kids safe and healthy.

Babies and children may be more affected by bites or stings than adults. Let’s start with some common spring and summer insects. Spider bites Most spider bites do not actually penetrate the skin, and the majority of spiders found in the U.S are mostly harmless with the important exception of the black widow spider and the brown recluse spider, which are both dangerous to humans. Spider bites are fortunately uncommon. In many cases, presumed spider bites are actually due to another skin condition or an insect sting. The black widow spider is said to feel like a pin-prick, and some victims do not even realize they have been bitten. Sometimes you may notice double fang marks on the skin. The most common symptoms where the bite occurs are immediate pain, burning, swelling, and redness. Other symptoms may include chills, fever, nausea and vomiting, and severe abdominal pain. While black widow spider bites are hardly ever fatal, rare deaths have occurred from brown recluse spider bites and are more common in children than in adults. At first the bite of a brown recluse spider leads to a mild stinging, followed by local redness and severe pain that usually develops within eight hours but may occur later. Some reports of brown recluse bites describe a blue or purple area around the bite, surrounded by a whitish ring and large red outer ring in a "bull's eye" pattern. A fluid-filled blister forms at the site and then sloughs off to reveal a deep ulcer that may turn black. If bitten by a brown recluse or black widow spider - Cleanse the wound. Use soap and water to clean the wound and skin around the spider bite. - Slow the venom's spread. If the spider bite is on an arm or a leg, tie a snug bandage above the bite and elevate the limb to help slow or halt the venom's spread. Ensure that the bandage is not so tight that it cuts off circulation in your arm or leg. - Use a cold cloth at the spider bite location. Apply a cloth dampened with cold water or filled with ice. Seek immediate medical attention. Treatment for the bite of a black widow may require an anti-venom medication. Doctors may treat a brown recluse spider bite with various medications.

Bee Stings In most cases, bee stings are just annoying and home treatment is all that's necessary to ease the pain. But if you're allergic to bee stings or you get stung numerous times, you may have a more serious reaction that requires emergency treatment. Most of the time the symptoms from a bee sting will be minor. Your child may experience a burning pain, a red welt, and slight swelling. Some children may have a stronger reaction with extreme redness and swelling that gets bigger over a couple of days. Children, adolescents, and adults who are allergic to bee stings may have a severe reaction called anaphylaxis. About 3% of people who are stung by bees quickly develop these anaphylaxis symptoms. - Skin reactions in parts of the body other than the sting area, including hives and itching and flushed or pale skin (almost always present with anaphylaxis) -  Difficulty breathing -  Swelling of the throat and tongue -  A weak and rapid pulse -  Nausea, vomiting or diarrhea -  Dizziness or fainting -  Loss of consciousness -  Convulsions -  Fever -  Shock may occur if the circulatory cannot get enough blood to vital organs. For most Bee stings you can apply an ice pack or cool compress, a meat tenderizer solution which can be made by mixing one part meat tenderizer and 4 parts water. Soak a cotton ball in the solution and apply to the bite for 15020 minutes. A baking soda paste works well or a topical anti-itch cream such as Calamine lotion. Talk to your pediatrician about ways to prevent bee stings and possible immunotherapy if your child is allergic. Multiple stings can be a medical emergency in children, older adults, and people who have heart or breathing problems. If your child is allergic to bee stings always have an EpiPen available and use it right away as your pediatrician has directed. Wasps, hornets, and yellow jacket stings are similar to bee stings.

Fire Ants A bite that will get your child’s attention quickly belongs to the fire ant. Fire ants are so named because their venom induces a painful, fiery sensation. When disturbed, fire ants are very aggressive. To help children avoid fire ants, parents should regularly check their yards and their children's play areas for the presence of the ants and their mounds. Then they should either eliminate the ants or make sure children avoid them. If a child is stung, apply ice to the bite site for 10 to 15 minutes. Elevate the extremity where the child was bit. Clean and clip the child's fingernails to prevent any secondary infection that can result from scratching the bite. Check with the child's pediatrician for the correct dose of an oral antihistamine to reduce itching and inflammation A small percentage of children stung -- probably less than 0 .5 percent -- experience a severe (anaphylactic) reaction. These occur within minutes of a sting and vary in severity. A child who is stung and within minutes begins to experience hives, weakness, dizziness, wheezing, difficulty swallowing, shortness of breath or confusion should be taken immediately to the nearest emergency room. Watch the area for signs of infection over the next couple of days.

Ticks Ticks are common in grasses and wooded areas. If you have pets make sure they are tick free. Ticks are usually harmless but they can carry Lyme disease. To remove a tick begin by taking a cotton swab or cotton ball. Dip the swab or cotton ball in a small glass container that you will be throwing out after use. Place a small amount of rubbing alcohol in the bottom of your container. Use at least 2 tablespoons of alcohol. Dab on the site of the tick on the child or pet. Do not let it run, that is why you are dabbing it rather than pouring it on the site. If there is excess, dab it with another cotton swab or cotton ball. Let this cotton ball or swab sit on the tick for 3 minutes. This suffocates the tick and he will back out for retrieval with tweezers. If that method is unsuccessful, use the alcohol swab again and let the area dry. Then take a clean, unused cotton swab and glob a dollop of Vaseline petroleum jelly on the site where you see the tick. Let this stay on top of the tick for 3 minutes. You will then remove the tick and the Vaseline petroleum jelly.

Mosquitoes Probably the most common insect bite in the spring and summer come form mosquitoes. Ivillage.com has these tips for treating and preventing mosquito bites. The usual reaction is a local skin inflammation that is red, raised and very itchy. If your child scratches the bite, it may become infected as well. Here's what you can do for your children to help ease the itch and pain caused by mosquito bites. Treatments: Apply anti-itch creams like calamine as needed to help prevent scratching • Use anti-inflammatory creams like cortisone cream to help ease the inflammation and itching • If there is severe itching and multiple bug bites use antihistamines like Benedryl. Because they tend to make children drowsy, they work particularly well at night. •  Antihistamines like Claritin, Allegra, and Zyrtec tend to be much less sedating, buit check with your pediatrician about the correct dosage and whether these products are safe for children. Other Suggestions:
 Keep your child's fingernails cut short to prevent scratching • Apply cold wet compresses to the area to ease discomfort • Have your child wear long pants and long sleeves (if the temperature is bearable) • Make sure window screens are used if you keep windows open in your home • Use insect repellant to help prevent bites from occurring Choosing an Insect Repellant DEET is the best insect repellant in terms of effectiveness against flies, gnats, chiggers, ticks and other insects. The higher the DEET concentration the better it works. For children, however, the EPA recommends a concentration of 10 percent or less to prevent side effects and toxicity.

Scorpions Scorpion bites are painful but mostly harmless. The only dangerous scorpion in North America, probably the most venomous of all North American bugs is the bark scorpion. Bark scorpions are found in all of Arizona, extending west across the Colorado River in to California and east in to New Mexico. Scorpions are related to spiders, ticks and mites. Usually, they only sting to protect themselves or of they feel threatened. Scorpions can get caught up in bedding or crawl in to shoes so always check your child’s clothing and bed if you suspect scorpions may be around.  Scorpion stings without a serious reaction can be treated with ice on the sting and over-the-counter pain medication. Bark scorpion anti-venom is available only in Arizona. Any sting that shows signs of a bark scorpion needs to be treated at a hospital. Anti-venom has been shown to significantly reduce the effects of the sting. Children love to be outside in the spring and summer when the daylight is longer and the backyard, playground, or campsite can become a magical play space. Insect bites are bound to happen. Most are just an annoyance, but make sure you know which ones to be concerned about and which ones may just require a hug and a kiss. For pictures of several types of insects such as Black Widow and Brown Recluse spiders, check out http://www.webmd.com/allergies/slideshow-bad-bugs

Daily Dose

Uber & Teens

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Do you have Uber cars in your area?  I first found out about Uber (and I am only using them as an example) when my son lived in NYC and often used the car service. Later on I heard about college kids using Uber as well.  In that case, many college kids did not have cars and/or they were being “responsible” after being at a party.

But recently, in conversations with my adolescent patients, I have heard that high school kids are using Uber to come home after a party, or other social activities. In otherwords, their parents are not picking them up from the dance, concert, or party but are letting their children (often young girls) call Uber.  Where are their parents and what are they thinking?

I realize that once your child heads off to college you hope and pray that they are making good choices and are being safe. You don’t really plan on picking them up after an event or talk to them that same night about what they have been doing and with whom.  But when we had high school age children, my expectations were that we, the parents, were responsible for taking our teens to the party and to pick them up. Once they were driving the “rules” changed a bit in that they were then often driving themselves to an event and then would drive home and we would be up waiting for them to get home.  They always knew that we would be there when they got home and also that if there were any “issues” we were also available to pick them up. We talked a lot about underage drinking as well as driving and responsibility.  Never did I think they would call a cab or car service, nor was that idea ever broached, they were to call their parents.

So now that these “app” car services are available around the clock, are parents abrogating their responsibilities for parenting teens?  By allowing their teens to call a car service for their ride home, are parents seemingly not interested in where their child has been or who they have been with or what they have been doing before they get home?  You certainly can drop your child at a concert or party and tell them to text Uber to get a ride home, but does this parental non-participation quietly help to condone inappropriate, risky, teen behavior?

Although picking your child up at the end of the evening or checking on them when they pull in the driveway will never ensure that your teen does not get into trouble, I think it does help them think a bit more about having to interact with their parents at curfew time. This “worry” might help lead them to make a better decision about drugs, alcohol or whom they are hanging out with. Putting teens into the “hands” (cars) of strangers as their ride home just seems wrong. Parents be aware. 

Daily Dose

Ear Tugging & Your Child

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I see a lot of parents who bring their baby/toddler/child in to the pediatrician with concerns that their child might have an ear infection. One of the reasons for their concern is often that their baby is tugging on their ears.  

Babies find their ears, just like their hands and feet, around 4 -6 months of age.  I guess a baby must think “this ear tugging is fun and feels good” as maybe babies have “itchy” ears just like adults. It also seems to be a self soothing habit for other children who seem to pull on their ears when they get tired and cranky.  Maybe it is related to new molars coming in at the back of the jaw line?   

Whatever the cause, it often concerns parents who are told by their friends or relatives, “I am worried, this ear pulling probably means the child has an ear infection”.  So, being a good parent off you go to your pediatrician only to find out that the ears a beautiful and clear! 

Most babies and children do not get an ear infection without ANY other symptoms besides ear pulling.  In most cases infants and toddlers will get a secondary ear infection during cold and flu season. The multitudes of viral respiratory infections that children get in the first 3 years of life, often cause continuous runny noses and congestion. This congestion causes fluid to build up in the middle ear space which connects to the nasal passages via a small canal called the eustachian tube.   

Infants and children have so called “immature” eustachian tubes that are soft, and don’t drain well and the tube gets inflamed and swollen from the viral infection as well.  At times this fluid gets secondarily infected from bacteria that find their way to the middle ear.  Voila....an ear infection ensues. 

So, if a parent brings their child in for “pulling on their ears” and they are otherwise well (no cough, congestion, runny nose and sleeping well) I usually ask if they want to “wager” if their child has an ear infection.  That is really not fair, as this sweet parent is only concerned because typically someone else told them they should be.  But, in this case a quarter bet is usually made and I end up with a lot of quarters.  (they are good for all of the other bets I do lose with parents and kids about all sorts of things). Friendly betting at the pediatrician’s office, wonder if I am going to be investigated! 

Don’t worry about simple ear pulling especially when you see it happening all of the time.   

Lastly, with the new guidelines for prescribing antibiotics for an ear infection parent’s don’t need to worry as much about a prescription for antibiotics and a few days of waiting will not hurt.  


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