Daily Dose

Chapped Cheeks

1.15 to read

Weather is crazy around the country and those cold temps continue. It was in the 80s this past weekend in Dallas but heading to the 20s this week!This really cold and dry winter has been hard on skin and I have seen more babies like this one who are coming in due to having “red cheeks”.  

These precious little red cheeks are just dry and chapped.  The toddler set seems be particularly affected as they are always getting their faces wiped!! Between those winter runny noses which parents are constantly having to wipe and the wiping of faces after finger foods have been “smeared” from cheek to cheek, a toddler’s face gets lots of wear and tear.

While it would seem that water on the face from lots of washing would be hydrating, it is actually not. At this time of year, a little less face washing is beneficial, but what toddler can go for more than an hour or so without having something washed off their face.

So to counteract all of the dryness requires lots of hydration with moisturizers. Right after washing, wiping your child’s face you need to use a thick moisturizer.  You cannot over moisturize your child during this time of year.   I am a fan of Cerave Cream and Aquaphor.  I often use Cerave (cream is thicker than the lotion) during the day and then lather on Aquaphor at bedtime!!  The thick moisturizer helps hold the water into the skin.   I was even known to rub Aquaphor on my own’s childrens’ faces once they were asleep, so they were not tempted to rub it off!!

Don’t worry, once the weather warms up, the heat is off and the humidity starts those rosy little cheeks will fade away....unless that is you don’t use sunscreen, but that is another blog!!

Daily Dose

Late Teether?

1:30 to read

Time for another of those moments in my office when I just turn my head and say “what?”.  The latest...during a 9 month old check up the child’s mother expressed concern that her daughter did not yet have any teeth.  

When I explained to her that this was totally within the range of normal, and in fact, I myself loved babies without hair or teeth in the first year of life!!! Why? They are “low maintenance”.  Don’t have to worry about washing dirty hair or brushing those first teeth...plenty of time to deal with that later on right?

But her concern was real...she was very worried about her daughter’s lack of teeth.  I reassured her that it was not uncommon, there are a lot of babies that will not get a tooth until around 1 year of age and late teething often runs in families.  I wondered if she knew when she or her husband had gotten their first tooth?

Upon further questioning her real concern was that she had been “told”  “if your child is a late teether they will also be a late reader?”  Was this something her friends told her on Facebook or on their Instagram post? I thought I had heard all sorts of concerns about teeth erupting...things like my child is fussy, doesn’t sleep well, drools a lot, chews on everything, has runny poop.....but won’t be able to read?  There is just too much information or rather “mis-information” out there.

So, it was such a relief for me to be able to tell her that I was not aware that there was any relationship between teething and reading. In fact...one of my own children had his first tooth erupt at 6 months (which is about average) and he ending up being dyslexic (which is another blog on successful ways to help children with learning differences).   My middle son did not get a tooth until about 18 months (which did worry my mother, she was ready to put money into savings for baby dentures), and he was reading before kindergarten ( which had nothing to do with us...we were focused on trying to teach his older brother how to read).

See why I love my job....something new everyday.... thankfully some of the concerns have no basis in fact....and I get to reassure parents.  

Daily Dose

Colds & Suctioning Your Child's Nose

1:30 to read

I am beginning to sound like a broken record, but we are in the throes of cold and flu season and unfortunately there are a few more months of this.  As every parent knows, colds (aka upper respiratory infections) are “age neutral”. 

In other words, there is not an age group that is immune to getting a cold and for every age child (and adult for that matter), the symptoms are the same. Congested nostrils, scratchy sore throat, cough, and just plain old feeling “yucky”. When an infant gets a stuffy nose, whether it is from “normal” newborn congestion, or from a cold, they often have a difficult time eating as an infant is a nose breather.  When they are nursing and their nose is “stopped  up”, they cannot breath or even eat, so it is sometimes necessary to clear their nasal passage to allow them to “suck” on the bottle or breast. 

Of course it is self evident that an infant cannot blow their nose, or rub or pick their nose so they must either be fortunate enough to sneeze those” boogers” out or have another means to clear the nose.  This is typically accomplished by using that wonderful “bulb syringe”. In our area they are called “blue bulb syringes” and every baby leaves the hospital with one tucked into their discharge pack.  As a new parent the blue bulb syringe looked daunting as the tip of the syringe appeared to be bigger than the baby’s nose.  But, if you have ever watched a seasoned nurse suck out a newborn’s nose, they can somehow manage to get the entire tip inside a baby’s nose. For the rest of us the tip just seemed to get inside the nostril and despite my best efforts at suctioning nothing came out. Once a nurse showed me the right “technique” I got to be a pretty good “suctioner”.  With the addition of a little nasal saline, which you can buy in pre made spray bottles, or which may be made at home with table salt and warm water, the suctioning gets a little easier as the nose drops helped to suction the mucous.

Now, I have become a firm believer that there is a place for suctioning a baby’s nose, but once a child is over about 6 months of age they KNOW  what you are getting ready to do. I am convinced that a 6 month baby with a cold sees the “blue bulb syringe” approaching their face and their eyes become dilated in fear of being suctioned!!  Then they begin to wail, and I know that when I cry I just make more mucous and the more I cry the more I make. So a baby with an already stuffy nose gets even more congested and “snotty” and the bulb syringe is only on an approach to their nose. It also takes at least two people to suction out a 6 – 12 month old baby’s nose as they can now purposely move away , and hit out to you to keep you away from their face and nose. It is like they are saying, “ I am not going to give in to the bulb syringe” without a fight! I swore I would not have a child with a “green runny nose” that was not suctioned.

As most parents know, don’t swear about anything, or you will be forever breaking unreasonable promises to yourself!  I think bulb suctioning is best for young infant’s and once they start to cry and put up a fight I would use other methods to help clear those congested noses.  Go back to the age old sitting in a bathroom which has been steamed up with hot water from a the shower. Or try a cool mist humidifier with some vapor rub in the mist (aroma therapy).  Those noses will ultimately run and the Kleenex will come out for perpetual wiping. Unfortunately, it takes most children many years before they learn to blow their nose, but what an accomplishment that is!!!  An important milestone for sure.

That's your daily dose for today. We'll chat again tomorrow. Send your question or comment to Dr. Sue!

Daily Dose

Why Babies Get "Goop" In Their Eyes

1:15 to read

If you have recently had a baby you may already know about “clogged tear ducts”. This is also named nasal lacrimal duct obstruction and is fairly common in newborn infants in the first weeks to months of life.

A baby’ s tear duct, the tiny little hole in the inner corner of the eye, is very small and narrow and may often get obstructed. If that is the case the tears that an infant makes gets backed up and may form a thickened “goopy” discharge in the eye. At times when this occurs the baby’s eye will seem to be “glued” shut as the goop gets in the eyelashes and almost seems to cement those little eyes shut. Occasionally the eye will look a little puffy due to the debris in the eye. The best thing to do for this problem is to use a warm compress or cotton ball dampened with warm water to wipe the eyelashes and remove the discharge from the eye.

Once the “goop” is removed and your baby opens their eye, look at the whites (conjuctiva) of the eye. The conjunctiva should not appear to be red or inflamed. The goop will re-accumulate over time, but the eye itself should continue to look clear. Babies with clogged tear ducts do not appear to be ill and continue to eat well. The only problem should be the goopy eye. In order to help open the clogged duct you can try to massage the inner lower corner of the baby’s eye (beneath the tear duct itself), several times a day. Gently apply pressure to the area and do this several times a day. The eye “goop” always seems to be worse after the baby has been sleeping. It is also not uncommon for one eye to clear up only to have the other eye develop “goop”.  Most of these obstructions resolve on its own by four to six months of age. If the tear duct continues to be obstructed, talk to your pediatrician about a possible referral to the pediatric ophthalmologist.

That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow.

Daily Dose

Treating Bee Stings

Bee stings are a right of passage during childhood, always memorable, but never fun.I was outside today and noticed that the bees are back, pollinating the flowers in my garden, but ready to sting too if they are crossed by bare feet or errant hands. Bee stings are a right of passage during childhood, always memorable, but never fun. Our office receives numerous calls about how to handle a bee sting. First thing is to get some ice or a cool compress on the sting, which relives both PAIN and swelling.

While the ice is working you can take a peek and see if the stinger is still in the skin, and if so do not go grab tweezers or your fingernails to try and remove the stinger. If you do that you will only make the sting worse. The best way to remove the stinger is by using the edge of a credit card to gently scrape the stinger out of the skin. Honey Bees leave behind their stinger while wasps and hornets do not. Unless the child is allergic to bee stings most people will only have a local reaction. If there are any symptoms associated with the sting such as swelling of face, mouth, lips, or difficulty swallowing or breathing, give an immediate dose of Benadryl (diphenhydramine) while calling 911. If the child has a known bee hypersensitivity and they have an epi pen you will need to use it and also call 911. For local reactions after the sting is cleaned you can apply calamine lotion or a topical steroid cream. For swelling and discomfort a dose of Benadryl is also recommended, as well as a pain reliever like ibuprofen which will also relieve local inflammation along with pain relief. The sting is usually not uncomfortable for more than 24 hours. Make sure to watch for signs of infection with increasing redness, streaking or pain at the site of the sting. If the area seems to be getting worse rather than better it is a good idea to let you pediatrician take a peek. That's your daily dose for today, we'll chat again tomorrow.

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Daily Dose

Getting Your Baby to Sleep!

1:30 to read

Did you know one of the biggest Google internet searches for parents revolves around “how do I get my baby to sleep?”  I guess that any new parent in the middle of the night is online searching for “THE ANSWER”, so of course you “Google it”!

Now that we are grandparents and the baby is about 6 weeks old (although technically she is a week old, as she was 5 weeks early) my son is also looking for answers on the internet to that same question....how to make her sleep, so I can too! He even asked me if their was “magic” to this?

If only there was an answer on Google or in any book. It just takes time and every baby is different.   I guess there are some babies that sleep through the night from the time they get home from the hospital, but I have never seen one.  I think some parents just forget that at some time or another they were up at night with a newborn.

A newborn baby does not understand circadian rhythm and they are really not “trying” to keep parents up at night.  It takes weeks for a newborn to even begin to have some “routine” to their day and I try never to use the word “schedule” when discussing a newborn.  A baby is not a robot, they do not eat every 3 hours and then sleep for 3 more before eating again. They are “little people” and their tummies sometimes need to eat in 2 hours and then later it may be 3 hours before another feeding.  Don’t you sometimes eat an early lunch one day and a later lunch the next? 

But by trying to awaken the baby throughout the day and offering a feeding every 2-3 hours you will hopefully notice after several weeks that your baby is eating more often during the day and suddenly may thrill you and sleep 4 hours at night. it just takes time....YOU cannot make it happen.  I tease new parents that awakening a newborn during the day and prayer is about all you can do....all babies do eventually sleep, but it may not be right after you get them home from the hospital...think several months (as in 2-4) and you will be happy if it happens sooner.

Lastly, with all of the tech in the room, don’t pick up your baby in the middle of the night if they are just “squirming” around. Babies are notoriously loud sleepers and if they are not crying let them be and you may be surprised that they arouse and went back to sleep. If your baby cries you absolutely go get them and console them and feed them too if it is time. An infant should not be left to cry. 

This too shall pass and sleep will come, but there will be new stages down the road that will keep parents up at night, of that you can be assured. Comes with the territory.

Daily Dose

Your Chid's Fever

1:30 to read

Now that you have taken your child’s temperature, what do you do with the information? As discussed previously, a fever is defined as a body temperature above 100.4 degrees. If you take your own temperature all day long it will be quite variable as will your child’s, and body temperature often goes up as the day goes on.

If your child has 100 degree temperature in the morning, the mother and pediatrician in me thinks that by the end of the day they may be running 101 degrees or higher. I would keep that child home that day to see what happens with the temperature. If you’re wrong and their temperature stays down, back to school or day care the next day. If it goes up you have not exposed everyone else throughout the day. All infant’s under two months of age with a documented temperature (preferably rectally) above 100.4, should be seen by their doctor. That is a phone call day or night, to find out if your doctor wants to see you in the office or go to ER etc. Do not give this age infant any acetaminophen, before talking to your doctor. Many times this age child will be admitted to the hospital, so be prepared for that discussion with your doctor.

Once your child is over two months of age but still younger than six months, it is important to discuss your child’s fever with the nurse or doctor. There are certain things they will ask you that will help determine if your child needs to be seen that day or night. After six months of age it is easier to judge a child’s degree of illness by not only the reading on the thermometer, but by how they are acting. The hardest thing to teach any parent (me included) is that the height of the fever does not necessarily correlate with degree of illness.

During flu and viral season, it is not uncommon to see temperatures in the 103 - 104 degree range. Try not to react to the number on the thermometer, but rather look at your child. Go ahead and treat the fever with either acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin) and then watch your child over the next 30 – 40 minutes. Reducing their fever will often improve how sick they look. Whenever a pediatrician walks into a room the first thing we do is look at how the child is interacting with the parent. Whether that is a toddler in a lap, or a big kid on the table, a quick look at a child is really worth a thousand words. If your child will smile (okay just briefly), make good eye contact, responds to the pediatrician by kicking and screaming (a toddler for sure), can play on the Nintendo DS, eat cheerios or candy or chips (I know, they won’t eat well when sick, do you?) and tell you just how crummy they feel, they are probably okay. I describe this as pitiful, and pathetic, but not critically ill. That is what we are trying to distinguish on a busy day in the office, and that is the same thing you want to look for in your own child.

It takes practice, but as a parent, you will be dealing with children and fevers for the next 21 years and you too will get better at dealing with fever. It is always scary the first time you see your child sick, but fever is not the enemy. It actually means that your child’s body is fighting the infection. So remember the mantra: Fever is your friend. I think we will be saying this a lot this winter. More fever topics later.

That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow.

Daily Dose

Ebola in U.S.

1:30

It was only a matter of time before a case of Ebola virus was diagnosed in the United States. It just so happens to be at the hospital that I practice in which is also directly across the street from my office.  I can already tell you that there is a lot of concern from our patient families as well as from friends who were at the hospital today including my daughter in law. Concern is one word, but hysteria and misinformation are also words that come to mind.

When I first heard the news I too was skeptical that the person admitted to Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas would actually have Ebola virus. We have been on the “alert” for enterovirus D-68, which has also been making headlines, but Ebola was not on my “radar:.  The moment that the CDC announced that the patient had indeed tested positive for Ebola virus, the news helicopters started circling above the office (not quite a many as there were for George Clooney’s wedding), but a considerable number (and noisy!).

I have fielded emails, texts and phones calls beginning this afternoon and into the night from concerned parents.  The first thing to know is that Ebola virus is not transmitted as a respiratory pathogen like flu, or a cold or even enterovirus.  (My daughter in law did not have a mask on as she went to her appointment this morning and she too was a bit concerned until we spoke). 

The Ebola virus is transmitted when you come into contact with body fluids like saliva, blood, urines, or feces from the patient and then can enter your body through micro-abrasions or cuts.  It is not a virus that you will catch if you walked by the patient or passed the patient in the hallway or the airport.  Again, you must come into contact with body fluids to catch this virus.

This patient is in strict isolation within the hospital which means only certain medical personnel will even be in contact with him.  The area that I practice in and the babies that we see in that hospital are in no risk for exposure to the virus. There are always infection control procedures within the hospital and they will continue to be followed.  

So, there is no reason to panic.  I am not afraid or concerned about continuing to work within the hospital. We will continue our regular days in the office and reassure families that they are not at risk. We pediatricians are still more concerned about airborne viruses such as RSV and flu that will cause considerable illness, and will soon begin circulating.  Get your flu vaccines, wash your hands, get enough sleep, exercise and continue to have healthy family meals. Remember, keep your child ( or yourself) home from day care or school if they have a fever.  This is still the best prescription to stay healthy.

 

Daily Dose

Lice is Back in the News

While school is in session lice continue to be a problem that "plagues" many families and makes many a parent want to pull out their own hair.Seems that lice are back in the news. While school is in session lice continue to be a problem that "plagues" many families and makes many a parent want to pull out their own hair. We have discussed previously treatment options for lice, and fact vs. fiction about methods to annihilate these pesky parasites.

There is a new article from the March issues of Archives of Dermatology that looks at the most accurate way to diagnose louse infestation in children. In most cases both schools and pediatricians use visual inspection for diagnosis. I am always looking at the nape of the neck, the temple and behind the ears when I am asked to inspect a child's head. When cute girls with thick dark, curly hair come in, it is a real challenge. It requires a great deal of patience on the part of the child and parent to meticulously inspect the entire head. I guess there is a reason for having three boys! In this study done in Germany it was found that wet combing hair that has been moistened with conditioner is the most accurate method to diagnose active lice infestation. Placing a light colored towel around the child's shoulders would also help to see what has been combed from the hair. In the case of nits or eggs, visual inspection is superior for accurate diagnosis. So, this tells me look and comb and the yield for accurate diagnosis will be greatest. The best news is that we see far fewer cases of lice in the summer months when the kids are out of school and outside. Remember lice don't have lungs or wings! That's your daily dose, we'll chat again tomorrow. More Information: Best Bet for Spotting Lice? A Wet Comb

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DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

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