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Daily Dose

Lice is Tough to Treat

1:15 to read

What are kids bringing home from school besides their homework? Lice! The good news is: lice are obligate parasites and don’t jump, or fly…they are transmitted by direct contact.  But, the smart louse has found another way to drive parents crazy…they are becoming more and more resistant to all of the over the counter products containing permethrin. 

A recent study has shown that 25 states now have a big problem with lice and permethrin resistance.  It seems that the lice are smart and they have developed “genetic mutations” which has made them drug resistant. Texas has had a problem for several years and I have had many patients coming into the office with bags full of “stuff” that they have used to treat their children’s head lice to no avail!!!  Many a mother has told me she is ready to try anything…including some things that might be considered unsafe, but you know a desperate mother.

While about 12 million children a year get head lice, the louse itself does not cause any disease, but just uncomfortable itching.  Parents spend multi millions of dollars each year trying to eradicate head lice. In states like Texas, California, Florida and Virginia the lice are immune to over the counter products, while in New York, New Jersey and several other states they are partially resistant. 

But don’t despair, despite the resistance to the over the counter products such as Nix, there are other prescription products available. Products such as benzoyl alcohol (Ulesfia), ivermectin (Sklice), malathion (Ovide), and spinosad (Natroba), may all be used to treat a case of head lice, but will require a prescription to obtain them.  Although prescription drugs typically are more expensive, treating head lice with an over the counter product may be an exercise in futility. It is likely to be more cost and time effective to start with a prescription product if you live in one of the 25 states which has shown drug resistance.

So, if you get a note that your child has head lice, pick up the phone and call your doctor’s office to see what advice they give you. 

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Daily Dose

Ear Tubes

1:00 to read

I had been seeing a 3 year old VERY verbal patient for several months as he would intermittently complain to his mother that his “ears were ON?”.  He would tell her this off and on but could not explain what he meant by this statement. He did not say his ears hurt, he did not have a fever, he was sleeping well….but he seemed to be bothered enough to talk about it from time to time.

 

His mother brought him in to see me a few times and his exam was normal…but one day when she brought him in I noticed that he had clear fluid behind his ear drum(serous otitis). His eardrum was not inflamed and his exam was otherwise normal.  When a child has fluid behind their ear drums it is not always a sign of infection, and in this case you watch and see if the fluid goes away on its own. 

 

Well, he continued to talk to his mother about his “ears being ON”, and he even told his teachers a few times.  Because he continued to talk about it ( over about 3 months) I sent him to see a pediatric ENT.

 

When the ENT saw him he also noted that he had some fluid behind one of his ear drums. Because he had had persistent fluid it was decided to place ear tubes….

 

And guess what? Once he had ears tubes placed he told me his “ears had turned off”!!  I guess he sometimes felt funny or heard sounds differently and that was his way to express his ear issue - on and off! What took me so long?

Children continue to amaze me. 

Daily Dose

Cold & Flu Season

1:30 to read

Despite the fact that the weather is beautiful in most parts of the country, it is Fall which means more viral upper respiratory infections. This is especially true of the 12-15 month old children who are now getting their “first of many” colds.  Many of their parents are concerned as to why they are suddenly getting sick…as they have not been sick before?

 

Well, here is the deal. Last fall and winter these children were babies in arms, and were not crawling and walking which also means they were not exploring their environment and all of the germs that go with touching EVERYTHING!  During that first winter season (if a child is not not  in day care or school) and does not have siblings (to get them sick) they may luck out for the first 2 - 12 months without a runny nose or cough. 

 

But….those days come to an end once they become toddlers. This is not alarming at all, but just a fact of life.  Toddlers will catch a little bit of everything once they hit one. That means they may have a cold, cough or even a fever every month…for the next fall/winter/early spring months, (which is about the next 5-6 months).  As a parent of a new toddler this is really difficult to fathom!

 

Every parent wants to know how they can “avoid” these illnesses….short answer is it is impossible and you should actually look at each viral illness as a victory which primes the immune system, and helps develop antibodies to some of the viruses we are all exposed to every day.  With each viral illness your child’s immune system is actually getting stronger…and you will notice that around the age of three your child will not catch as many colds and coughs as they did when they were younger. I know that seems like such a long time!! Unfortunately, parents of toddlers also catch a few more illnesses as they too are “over exposed” by their child. 

 

Remember to always watch your child for any difficulty breathing by looking at their chest with their shirts off - you do not want to see them look like they are “working with their ribs to breathe”. You also need to make sure they are well oxygenated and should turn red with cough and never a dusky blue color…especially important in young infants. Any concerns call your doctor.

 

So…gear up for winter as peak upper respiratory season is not even here yet!!  Get those flu vaccines too. 

Daily Dose

How to Treat Poison Ivy

1.15 to read

With the long weekend here, many families are enjoying the outdoors. But with outdoor activity, your children may develop summer rashes like poison ivy, poison oak or poison sumac. Each plant is endemic to different areas of the country, but unfortunately all 50 states have one of these pesky plants. Teach your children the adage “leaves of three, let it be”, so they come to recognize the typical leaves of the poison ivy.

The rash of poison ivy (we will use this as the prototype) is caused by exposure of the skin to the plant sap urushiol, and the subsequent allergic reaction. Like most allergies, this reaction requires previous exposure to the plant, and upon re-exposure your child will develop an allergic contact dermatitis. This reaction may occur anywhere from hours to days after exposure, but typically occurs one to three days after the sap has come into contact with your child’s skin and they may then develop the typical linear rash with vesicles and papules that are itchy, red and swollen. Poison ivy is most common in people ages four to 30. During the spring and summer months I often see children who have a history of playing in the yard, down by a creek, exploring in the woods etc, who then develop a rash. I love the kids playing outside, but the rash of poison ivy may be extremely painful especially if it is on multiple surface areas, as in children who are in shorts and sleeveless clothes at this time of year. The typical fluid filled vesicles (blisters) of poison ivy will rupture (after scratching), ooze and will ultimately crust over and dry up, although this may take days to weeks. The fluid from the vesicles is NOT contagious and you cannot give the poison ivy to others once you have bathed and washed off the sap. You can get poison ivy from contact with your pet, toys, or your clothes etc. that came in contact with the sap, and have not have been washed off. If you know your child has come into contact with poison ivy try to bath them immediately and wash vigorously with soap and water within 5

Daily Dose

No Need for Stitches?

1.45 to read

OUCH!! This week, I was heading out to grab some lunch when a patient of mine, who happens to have 3 young sons (brings back memories) walked in with her youngest son who had been jumping on the bed and bumped his head!

As you can see by the picture, there was a nice little laceration right in the middle of his forehead. This was the perfect wound that would have previously required a stitch or two, but can now be closed with a liquid adhesive called Dermabond.

Fortunately, this experienced mother of 3 boys had already become a fan of Dermabond and instead of going to the ER; she came by the office for a fairly easy procedure to close the wound.  Smart Mom!

When Dermabond was released in the early 2000’s it took me awhile to get used to how easy this made wound closure.  Dermabond is a liquid skin adhesive that holds wound edges together. The best thing is that it is painless and can be used on small superficial lacerations. Even for a wiggly toddler in most cases the laceration can be closed even while the parent is holding a child still. This is certainly not the case when having to suture!

Dermabond forms a polymer which causes adhesion of the wound edges so it is perfect for “clean, straight, small” lacerations that I often see among my patients.  The classic ones are on the edge of the eye, the chin, the forehead or even the scalp. In studies the cosmetic outcome was comparable to suturing, and in my opinion for those small lacerations it is preferable.

So, we cleaned the wound up, laid him right down (he was perfectly still too) and within 5 minutes the head wound was closed and a happy 2 year waltzed out of the office. Not a tear to be found, but I did have a little residual glue on my finger!

The Dermabond will wear off on its own in 5 – 10 days. Once the adhesive comes off I always remind parents to use sunscreen on the area, which also helps to prevent scarring.

Happily this little guy left while singing “Dr. Sue said, no more little boys jumping on the bed!”

That’s your daily dose for today.  We’ll chat again tomorrow.

Daily Dose

Happy Thanksgiving From The Kid's Doctor

:30 to read

I just wanted to take this opportunity to wish everyone a Happy Thanksgiving. I hope that you have the opportunity to gather around the family table with many generations and enjoy this special day of Thanksgiving. 

I am thankful for my family, for our many friends who we will gather with and for all of the many blessings that we have. I am also so appreciative of those who are serving our country around the world and here at home, and for their many sacrifices that enables each of us to live in freedom. I wish that I could hug their family members who will be without them this Thanksgiving and pray that their loved ones will return home safely. Have a blessed Thanksgiving.

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Daily Dose

Ear Infections

1:30 to read

Musings from the very busy pediatric office:  with all of the advances in technology over the last 30 years why is it that examining a child’s ears and visualizing their eardrum continues to be challenging?  I started thinking about this while examining a very unhappy, strong and febrile toddler….probably the 20th patient of the day. 

 

During the “sick season” many of the patients who come to my office are young children whose parents are worried that they may have an ear infection.  This concern is one of the most frequent reasons for pediatric office visits. While I realize that many of my colleagues are in the operating room operating on brains or doing open heart surgery (truly saving lives) the one advantage that they have is that their patient is under anesthesia while they are doing complicated procedures. Which only means that they are not trying to wrestle, cajole, or coax a child into letting them look into their ear canal, and then only to find that you can’t see a thing as the canal is full of wax (cerumen).  

 

At times examining ears can be fairly simple and straight forward, but some days it seems that it may be easier to attempt to fly than to look at a 16 month old child’s ears. Today was one of those days. It seemed that every child I saw had a temperature over 102 degrees, and they all had “waxy” ears. While there are several ways to remove wax from the ear canal, none of them is easily done in a toddler, especially when the wax is hard and difficult to remove. Having 3 children myself and one who had recurrent ear infections and tympanostomy tubes, I know what it is like to have to hold your child on the pediatrician’s exam table while they irrigate or “dig” wax out of the ears.  Not fun….!!!  But, at the same time I realize that this is the only means to see if the ear is infected and if there is the need for an antibiotic. 

 

With the advent of the HIB and Pneumococcal vaccines the incidence of ear infections has dropped significantly, as these bacteria were common causes of otitis. But, ear infections are still the #1 reason that a child receives an antibiotic, especially in the first 2 years of life.  Therefore, a good ear exam is one of the most important things your pediatrician does, as I know you don’t want your child to receive an unnecessary antibiotic!

 

Please know that pediatricians do not enjoy making a child uncomfortable, but somehow that ear drum needs to be seen…especially in a sick child.   

 

So…why has some brilliant medical device inventor not found a way to wave a magic wand over a child’s ear to “tell me” if their ear is infected?  To date, I have not seen any “new” ways to accurately examine an ear other than with the otoscope…and a clean ear canal…which means unhappy children (and parents ) while I try to clean their ears.  

 

Remember, don’t use q-tips in your child’s ears and if your pediatrician has to struggle a bit to clean out  your child’s ears, it is only because they are doing a good job!!  I am waiting for the “easy” button.

   

Daily Dose

Cough Medicine Alert

Should the FDA limit cough medicines for kids?With cough and cold season already here and only getting worse as winter arrives, many parents are asking whether they should use over-the-counter (OTC) cough and cold preparations. There are many studies that show that these products really do not help treat the common cold. On top of that they may actually have adverse effects when used in children and there have even been deaths reported due to inappropriate dosing of these medications.

The American Academy of Pediatrics does not recommend using OTC cold remedies in children under six and the FDA says not to use in children under two. There are so many products out there and most contain the same ingredients causing even more confusion for parents. The longer I practice, as well as taking care of my own children, I agree that these medicines really don't do much of anything for a cold. The best medicine still seems to be the tried and true remedies of rest, fluids, nasal saline irrigation and a box of kleenex. So....throw away any leftover cough and cold preps and get ready for winter with your latest recipe for chicken noodle soup. That's your daily dose. We'll chat tomorrow.

Daily Dose

When Bug Bites Get Infected

1.00 to read

It is the season for bug bites and and I am seeing a lot of parents who are bringing their children in for me to look at all sorts of insect bites. I am not always sure if the bite is due to a mosquito, flea or biting flies, but some of them can cause fairly large reactions. 

The immediate reaction to an insect bite usually occurs in 10-15 minutes after bitten, with local swelling and itching and may disappear in an hour or less. A delayed reaction may appear in 12-24 hours with the development of an itchy red bump which may persist for days to weeks.  This is the reason that some people do not always remember being bitten while they were outside, but the following day may show up with bites all over their arms, legs or chest, depending on what part of the body had been exposed. 

Large local reactions to mosquito bites are very common in children. For some reason, it seems to me that “baby fat” reacts with larger reactions than those bites on older kids and adults. (no science, just anecdote). Toddlers often have itchy, red, warm swellings which occur within minutes of the bites. 

Some of these will go on to develop bruising and even spontaneous blistering 2-6 hours after being bitten. These bites may persist for days to weeks, so in theory, those little chubby legs may be affected for most of the summer. 

Severe local reactions are called “skeeter syndrome” and occur within hours of being bitten and may involve swelling of an entire body part such as the hand, face or an extremity. These are often misdiagnosed as cellulitis, but with a good history of the symptoms  (the rapidity with which the area developed redness, swelling, warmth to touch and tenderness) you can distinguish large local reactions from infection.

Systemic reactions to mosquito bites including generalized hives, swelling of the lips and mouth, nausea, vomiting and wheezing have been reported due to a true allergy to the mosquito salivary proteins, but are extremely rare. 

The treatment of local reactions to bites involves the use of topical anti-itching preparations like Calamine lotion, Sarna lotion and Dommeboro soaks.  This may be supplemented by topical steroid creams (either over the counter of prescription) to help with itching and discomfort. 

An oral antihistamine (Benadryl) may also reduce some of the swelling and itching. Do not use topical antihistamines. Try to prevent secondary infection (from scratching and picking) by using antibacterial soaps, trimming fingernails and applying an antibiotic cream (polysporin) to open bites. 

Due to an exceptionally warm winter throughout the country the mosquito population seems to be especially prolific. The best treatment is prevention!! Before going outside use a DEET preparation in children over the age of six months, and use the lowest concentration that is effective.  Mosquito netting may be used for infants in strollers.  Remember, do not reapply bug spray like you would sunscreen. 

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