Daily Dose

Allergy Season!

1:30 to read

There are a lot of kids (and their parents) who are dealing with “red eyes” right now.  The spring winds are really blowing that pollen around and the oak, mulberry, maple, hackberry....all trees that are the major contributors to this problem.  

I have received lots of pictures of children with puffy eyelids as well as the area beneath their eyes, (so called allergic shiners).  They also have inflamed eyes where the whites are streaked with red and many have a watery or gunky discharge.  They are all rubbing their eyes like crazy as well..and how do you really explain to a child under the age of 5-6 years to stop rubbing their eyes!

Allergic conjunctivitis is uncomfortable and also causes a lot of children to be sent home from school due to having “pink eye”. But this type of pink eye is not contagious, rather it is due to an allergic reaction causing eye inflammation.  It is often seen several hours after children have been outside for play time and recess.  

Seasonal allergic eye symptoms are some of the most aggravating.  Fortunately, just like the over the counter nasal steroid sprays to help allergic nasal symptoms, there are also over the counter eye drops to combat the misery of allergic conjunctivitis.  While these eye drops were previously only available by prescription you can now get them at any drug store.

There are two brands, Zaditor and Patanol that combine both an antihistamine/decongestant with a mast cell stabilizer, which in combination help to prevent allergic conjunctivitis. Like a nasal steroid, you should start using the eye drops before the the pollen count increases as it takes several days for the drops to become effective. They also need to be used on a regular basis...better compliance means less symptoms.

While younger children may not be “fans” of eye drops (and these do sting a bit), I can usually get a 5 or 6 year old to begin using them as they can see how much better they feel if they do.  I continue using them for the duration of the allergy season. Watch the pollen counts for your area. The northern states will be dealing with this issue a bit later than those of us in the southern and middle of the U.S., where we are in full pollen bloom!

Daily Dose

The Difference Between Cradle Cap And Dandruff

1.15 to read

I recently received a question from a Twitter follower related to cradle cap and dandruff. She wanted to know if there was a difference in the two.

You know there really isn’t as they are both due to seborrheic dermatitis, an inflammatory condition of the skin in which the skin overproduces skin cells and sebum (the skins natural oil). Cradle cap is the term used for the scaly dermatitis seen on the scalp in infants. It is also seen on the eyelids, eyebrows, and behind the ears. It is typically seen after about three months of age and will often resolve on its own by the time a baby is eight to 12 months old. It is usually simply a “cosmetic” problem for a baby as it looks like a yellowish plaque on a baby’s scalp and is often not even noticed by anyone other than the parents. Unlike seborrheic dermatitis in adults, cradle cap typically doesn’t itch. It is thought that cradle cap may occur in infancy due to hormonal influences from the mother that were passed across the placenta to the baby. These hormones cause the sebaceous glands to become over active. In some severe cases an infant’s scalp becomes really scaly and inflamed and causes even more parental concern, as it appears that the infant is uncomfortable and may be trying to scratch their head by rubbing it on surfaces. The treatment for cradle cap is to wash the baby’s scalp daily with a mild shampoo and then to use a soft comb or brush to help remove the scales once they have been loosened with washing. When washing the head make sure to get the shampoo behind the ears and in the brows (keeping the soap out of baby’s eyes). This is usually sufficient treatment for most cradle cap. In situations where the greasy scales seem to be worsening it may help to put a small amount of mineral oil or olive oil on the baby’s head and let it sit (I left a small amount on my children’s heads overnight) and then to shampoo the following day. The oil will help the scales to loosen up and come off more easily. For babies that have very inflamed irritated cradle cap a visit to your pediatrician may be warranted to confirm the diagnosis. In persistent cases I often recommend shampooing several times a week with a dandruff shampoo that has either selenium (Selsun) or zinc pyrithione (Head and Shoulders) making sure not to get any in the infant’s eyes. I may then also use a hydrocortisone cream or foam on the scalp that will lessen the inflammation and itching. In these cases it may take several weeks to totally clear up the problem. As children get older, especially during puberty, you may see a return of seborrhea as dandruff. Again you can use dandruff shampoos. It also seems that with the overproduction of sebum there is an overgrowth of a fungus called “malessizia” so using a shampoo for dandruff as well as a antifungal shampoo (Nizoral) often works. I have teens alternate different shampoos, as sometimes it seems to work better than always using the same shampoo for months on end. Teens don’t like white flakes falling from their scalp and unlike a baby, a teen is worried about the cosmetic issues of seborrhea! That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow. Send your question to Dr. Sue!

Daily Dose

It’s The Season For Bug Bites & Stings

1:30 to read

Children love to be outside in the spring and summer when the daylight is longer and the backyard, playground, or campsite can become a magical play space. Insect bites are bound to happen. Most are just an annoyance, but make sure you know which ones to be concerned about and which ones may just require a hug and a kiss.It’s that time of year when insect bites and stings start showing up on your kids. Knowing how to prevent and treat common insect bites and stings, and knowing when to not overreact, can help keep your kids safe and healthy.

Babies and children may be more affected by bites or stings than adults. Let’s start with some common spring and summer insects. Spider bites Most spider bites do not actually penetrate the skin, and the majority of spiders found in the U.S are mostly harmless with the important exception of the black widow spider and the brown recluse spider, which are both dangerous to humans. Spider bites are fortunately uncommon. In many cases, presumed spider bites are actually due to another skin condition or an insect sting. The black widow spider is said to feel like a pin-prick, and some victims do not even realize they have been bitten. Sometimes you may notice double fang marks on the skin. The most common symptoms where the bite occurs are immediate pain, burning, swelling, and redness. Other symptoms may include chills, fever, nausea and vomiting, and severe abdominal pain. While black widow spider bites are hardly ever fatal, rare deaths have occurred from brown recluse spider bites and are more common in children than in adults. At first the bite of a brown recluse spider leads to a mild stinging, followed by local redness and severe pain that usually develops within eight hours but may occur later. Some reports of brown recluse bites describe a blue or purple area around the bite, surrounded by a whitish ring and large red outer ring in a "bull's eye" pattern. A fluid-filled blister forms at the site and then sloughs off to reveal a deep ulcer that may turn black. If bitten by a brown recluse or black widow spider - Cleanse the wound. Use soap and water to clean the wound and skin around the spider bite. - Slow the venom's spread. If the spider bite is on an arm or a leg, tie a snug bandage above the bite and elevate the limb to help slow or halt the venom's spread. Ensure that the bandage is not so tight that it cuts off circulation in your arm or leg. - Use a cold cloth at the spider bite location. Apply a cloth dampened with cold water or filled with ice. Seek immediate medical attention. Treatment for the bite of a black widow may require an anti-venom medication. Doctors may treat a brown recluse spider bite with various medications.

Bee Stings In most cases, bee stings are just annoying and home treatment is all that's necessary to ease the pain. But if you're allergic to bee stings or you get stung numerous times, you may have a more serious reaction that requires emergency treatment. Most of the time the symptoms from a bee sting will be minor. Your child may experience a burning pain, a red welt, and slight swelling. Some children may have a stronger reaction with extreme redness and swelling that gets bigger over a couple of days. Children, adolescents, and adults who are allergic to bee stings may have a severe reaction called anaphylaxis. About 3% of people who are stung by bees quickly develop these anaphylaxis symptoms. - Skin reactions in parts of the body other than the sting area, including hives and itching and flushed or pale skin (almost always present with anaphylaxis) -  Difficulty breathing -  Swelling of the throat and tongue -  A weak and rapid pulse -  Nausea, vomiting or diarrhea -  Dizziness or fainting -  Loss of consciousness -  Convulsions -  Fever -  Shock may occur if the circulatory cannot get enough blood to vital organs. For most Bee stings you can apply an ice pack or cool compress, a meat tenderizer solution which can be made by mixing one part meat tenderizer and 4 parts water. Soak a cotton ball in the solution and apply to the bite for 15020 minutes. A baking soda paste works well or a topical anti-itch cream such as Calamine lotion. Talk to your pediatrician about ways to prevent bee stings and possible immunotherapy if your child is allergic. Multiple stings can be a medical emergency in children, older adults, and people who have heart or breathing problems. If your child is allergic to bee stings always have an EpiPen available and use it right away as your pediatrician has directed. Wasps, hornets, and yellow jacket stings are similar to bee stings.

Fire Ants A bite that will get your child’s attention quickly belongs to the fire ant. Fire ants are so named because their venom induces a painful, fiery sensation. When disturbed, fire ants are very aggressive. To help children avoid fire ants, parents should regularly check their yards and their children's play areas for the presence of the ants and their mounds. Then they should either eliminate the ants or make sure children avoid them. If a child is stung, apply ice to the bite site for 10 to 15 minutes. Elevate the extremity where the child was bit. Clean and clip the child's fingernails to prevent any secondary infection that can result from scratching the bite. Check with the child's pediatrician for the correct dose of an oral antihistamine to reduce itching and inflammation A small percentage of children stung -- probably less than 0 .5 percent -- experience a severe (anaphylactic) reaction. These occur within minutes of a sting and vary in severity. A child who is stung and within minutes begins to experience hives, weakness, dizziness, wheezing, difficulty swallowing, shortness of breath or confusion should be taken immediately to the nearest emergency room. Watch the area for signs of infection over the next couple of days.

Ticks Ticks are common in grasses and wooded areas. If you have pets make sure they are tick free. Ticks are usually harmless but they can carry Lyme disease. To remove a tick begin by taking a cotton swab or cotton ball. Dip the swab or cotton ball in a small glass container that you will be throwing out after use. Place a small amount of rubbing alcohol in the bottom of your container. Use at least 2 tablespoons of alcohol. Dab on the site of the tick on the child or pet. Do not let it run, that is why you are dabbing it rather than pouring it on the site. If there is excess, dab it with another cotton swab or cotton ball. Let this cotton ball or swab sit on the tick for 3 minutes. This suffocates the tick and he will back out for retrieval with tweezers. If that method is unsuccessful, use the alcohol swab again and let the area dry. Then take a clean, unused cotton swab and glob a dollop of Vaseline petroleum jelly on the site where you see the tick. Let this stay on top of the tick for 3 minutes. You will then remove the tick and the Vaseline petroleum jelly.

Mosquitoes Probably the most common insect bite in the spring and summer come form mosquitoes. Ivillage.com has these tips for treating and preventing mosquito bites. The usual reaction is a local skin inflammation that is red, raised and very itchy. If your child scratches the bite, it may become infected as well. Here's what you can do for your children to help ease the itch and pain caused by mosquito bites. Treatments: Apply anti-itch creams like calamine as needed to help prevent scratching • Use anti-inflammatory creams like cortisone cream to help ease the inflammation and itching • If there is severe itching and multiple bug bites use antihistamines like Benedryl. Because they tend to make children drowsy, they work particularly well at night. •  Antihistamines like Claritin, Allegra, and Zyrtec tend to be much less sedating, buit check with your pediatrician about the correct dosage and whether these products are safe for children. Other Suggestions:
 Keep your child's fingernails cut short to prevent scratching • Apply cold wet compresses to the area to ease discomfort • Have your child wear long pants and long sleeves (if the temperature is bearable) • Make sure window screens are used if you keep windows open in your home • Use insect repellant to help prevent bites from occurring Choosing an Insect Repellant DEET is the best insect repellant in terms of effectiveness against flies, gnats, chiggers, ticks and other insects. The higher the DEET concentration the better it works. For children, however, the EPA recommends a concentration of 10 percent or less to prevent side effects and toxicity.

Scorpions Scorpion bites are painful but mostly harmless. The only dangerous scorpion in North America, probably the most venomous of all North American bugs is the bark scorpion. Bark scorpions are found in all of Arizona, extending west across the Colorado River in to California and east in to New Mexico. Scorpions are related to spiders, ticks and mites. Usually, they only sting to protect themselves or of they feel threatened. Scorpions can get caught up in bedding or crawl in to shoes so always check your child’s clothing and bed if you suspect scorpions may be around.  Scorpion stings without a serious reaction can be treated with ice on the sting and over-the-counter pain medication. Bark scorpion anti-venom is available only in Arizona. Any sting that shows signs of a bark scorpion needs to be treated at a hospital. Anti-venom has been shown to significantly reduce the effects of the sting. Children love to be outside in the spring and summer when the daylight is longer and the backyard, playground, or campsite can become a magical play space. Insect bites are bound to happen. Most are just an annoyance, but make sure you know which ones to be concerned about and which ones may just require a hug and a kiss. For pictures of several types of insects such as Black Widow and Brown Recluse spiders, check out http://www.webmd.com/allergies/slideshow-bad-bugs

Daily Dose

Why Kids Should Wear a Helmet

1:30 to read

Accidents in children are always an ever present problem. From scraped knees, to bumped heads, broken arms and stitches there are always injuries in our children. Accidents in children are always an ever present problem. From scraped knees, to bumped heads, broken arms and stitches there are always injuries in our children. Thank goodness most of them are traumatic at the moment, usually more to the parent than the child, and the child quickly recovers and is on to the next thing.

One way to help protect our children is by using protective "gear" when appropriate. We are really good about using car seats, child proofing houses and pools for the toddler set, but as the children get older there are other dangers lurking around with the bicycles, scooters, skateboards and the newest rip stick. All of these "wheeled" devices pose dangers for falls and "wipe outs" that may lead to things as mild as cuts and scrapes or as serious as a head injury. The hardest thing to get a school age child to understand is the meaning of the word ACCIDENT.

They do not understand that even if they think they have mastered the bike or rip stick, an accident can happen at any time. When I am talking to the elementary school set and ask them about mastering a bicycle on two wheels they are so proud to tell me of their accomplishments. But when I ask them what they are wearing on their head while riding, I don't always hear "a helmet". Children and adults on bicycles need to wear helmets at all times. I see kids riding their bikes to school (great exercise), but not a helmet in sight on their head. Don't let your child on their bicycles without a helmet, insist on a helmet just like a seat belt. If they become accustomed to always putting on a helmet before hopping on that bike or skateboard it will just become second nature. If they choose not to wear their helmet, then put the bike in "time out" for awhile to let them know that you are not going to allow them to ride without protection. Knee pads and wrist guards are great, but we can usually set a wrist fracture, or stitch up a knee. A head injury is another story!

That's your daily dose, we'll chat tomorrow.

Daily Dose

Bright Light & Sneezing

1:30 to read

What is the connection between bright light and sneezing? DId you know it was hereditary?I have always noticed that I frequently sneeze when I walk outside, and this was especially noticeable this summer with all of the bright sunny HOT days that we experienced. I thought I had remembered that my mother often did this too and when I asked her she confirmed this.

I was recently reminded of this again when I was with my youngest son moving him back to school. It seemed that every time we walked outside to get another load of boxes he sneezed! We both sounded like “Sneezy” one of the Seven Dwarfs.

Of course my son announced, “Mom are you just realizing this? I have always sneezed just like Ohma and you do”. Oh well, I am finally catching on.

This of course piqued my curiosity and then I remembered that I had read something about “the photic sneeze reflex”.  It has also been name ACHOO: Autosomal Cholinergic Helio-Opthalmic Outburst (and you thought ACHOO was the sound you made!)

It is estimated that this reflex affects about 1 in 4 people. It is inherited in the autosomal dominant manner (remember your days in biology and big B and little b?) If you have the “sneezy gene” your child has a 50-50 chance of also having it.

This reflex has been known for a long time but there wasn’t much science as to the cause. But a recent study (very small only 20 people) compared photic sneezers to controls and found that when shown a shifting pattern of images, the visual cortex of the sneezers showed higher activity than those of the control subjects.

There needs to be much more research done on this topic with larger groups of people studied to further confirm this finding.  But, nevertheless, it is interesting that scientists are now trying to elucidate the mystery of the photic sneeze.

In the meantime I realized that another one of my son’s also has the gene. Funny how you suddenly recognize a familial pattern to sneezing only to find out it is in the genes. It also reminds me I have a blue eyed and 2 brown eyed children, back to those genes again.  Just like they taught me in medical school, take a good family history!

That’s your daily dose for today.  We’ll chat again tomorrow.

Daily Dose

Kids Who Snore

1.30 to read

Does your child snore?  If so, have you discussed their snoring with your pediatrician.  A recent study published in Pediatrics supported the routine screening and tracking of snoring among preschoolers.  Pediatricians should routinely be inquiring about your child’s sleep habits, as well as any snoring that occurs on a regular basis, during your child’s routine visits.  

Snoring may be a sign of obstructive sleep apnea and/or sleep disordered breathing (SDB), and habitual snoring has been associated with both learning and behavioral problems in older children. But this study was the first to look at preschool children between the ages of 2-3 years.

The study looked at 249 children from birth until 3 years of age, and parents were asked report how often their child snored on a weekly basis at both 2 and 3 years of age.  Persistent snorers were defined as those children who snored more than 2x/week at both ages 2 and 3.  Persistent loud snoring occurred in 9% of the children who were studied.

The study then looked at behavior and as had been expected persistent snorers had significantly worse overall behavioral scores.  This was noted as hyperactivity, depression and attentional difficulties.  Motor development did not seem to be impacted by snoring.

So, intermittent snoring is  common in the 2 to 3 year old set and does not seem to be associated with any long term behavioral issues. It is quite common for a young child to snore during an upper respiratory illness as well .  But persistent snoring needs to be evaluated and may need to be treated with the removal of a child’s adenoids and tonsils.

If you are worried about snoring, talk to your doctor. More studies are being done on this subject as well, so stay tuned.

Daily Dose

Spring Viruses

1.30 to read

While it is warming up here in Dallas, many parts of the country are still seeing freezing temperatures and even snow! Even so, I am beginning to see typical spring illnesses like Fifth’s disease. 

Fifth disease is a common viral illness seen in children, often in the late winter and spring. Many of these children look like they have gotten a little sun burn on their faces (just as your child starts playing outside) as they often show up in my office with the typical slapped cheek rash on their faces.  At the same time they may also have a lacy red rash on their arms and legs, and occasionally even their trunks.

Fifth’s is also called erythema infectiosum and is so named as it is the fifth of the six rash associated illnesses of childhood. Fifth disease is caused by Parvovirus B19, which is a virus that infects humans. It is NOT the same parvovirus that infects your pet dog or cat, so do not fear your child will not give it to their pet or vice a versa.  In most cases a child may have very few symptoms of illness, other than the rash.  In some cases a child may have had a low-grade fever, or runny nose or just a few days of not feeling well and then the rash may develop several days later. The rash may also be so insignificant as to not be noticed. When I see a child with Fifth disease it is usually an easy diagnosis based on their few symptoms and the typical rash.

Although children with Fifth are probably contagious at some time during their illness, it is thought that by the time the rash occurs the contagious period has passed. This is why you never know where you got this virus. (the incubation period is somewhere between 4-20 days after exposure).  Parvovirus B19 may be found in respiratory secretions and is probably spread by person to person contact.  During outbreaks it has been reported that somewhere between 10-60% of students in a class may become infected.

Most adults have had Fifth disease and may not even have remembered it, as up to 20% of those infected with parvovirus B19 do not develop symptoms, so it is often not a memorable event during childhood.

Fifth disease is another one of those wonderful viruses that resolves on its own. I like to refer to the treatment as “benign neglect” as there is nothing to do!  The rash may take anywhere from 7–10 days to resolve. I do tell parents that the rash may seem to come and go for a few days and seems to be exacerbated by sunlight and heat. So, it is not uncommon to see a child come in from playing on a hot sunny day and the rash is more obvious on those sun exposed areas. 

Occasionally a child will complain of itching, and you can use a soothing lotion such as Sarna or even Benadryl to relieve problematic itching. A cool shower or bath at the end of a warm spring day may work just as well too. Children who are immunocompromised, have sickle cell disease, or have leukemia or cancer may not handle the virus as well and they should be seen by their pediatrician. But in most cases there is no need to worry about Fifth disease, so it is business as usual with school, spring days at the park and Easter parties.

That's your daily dose for today.  We'll chat again tomorrow.

Daily Dose

A Baby Girl!

1.15 to read

Did you hear my big news?? I am officially a grandmother of a new “premature” but healthy baby girl!!! Yes a GIRL!!  After raising three sons I really thought I had mistaken the text announcing a baby girl.   As you probably know, all important information is now received via a text.....so as all four first time grandparents sat in the labor and delivery waiting room one of us got the text that read.....healthy but tiny baby girl...all good!! 

Now, if you have ever sat with a group of friends where everyone is awaiting the same information via text you know that despite the sender pushing send at the same time...the text may arrive on one person’s phone before another, even when sitting right next to each other. That was the case in the waiting room.....we all had phones, but one grandparent got the text first and read it and we all went, REALLY, for real a girl?? 

Despite the fact that our sweet grand daughter wanted to arrive 5 weeks early, she weighed in at 4’12” and only had to spend 8 days in the hospital.  She must have known how excited we all were and we wanted to be able to hold her sooner than later.  

After 2 nights in the neonatal ICU, where she had wonderful care and reassuring doctors and nurses, she was moved to the Special Care Nursery where we were allowed to hold her and feed her and gaze upon her in wonder.   Just think four doting grandparents who all wanted to hold her....we should have had quadruplets.  

After a few days of “feeding and growing”  she was discharged and I am happy to report she is now a whopping 5 lbs of pure joy. She is home with her parents and thriving.    

What a gift to watch your own children begin their parenting journey. I am doing the best I can to “keep quiet” and just enjoy being a grandmother...sometimes not easy but trying. Parenting never ends....especially when you are a mom. I can’t wait to take a grand daughter shopping, put bows in her hair and have tea parties, and all of the things my boys just didn’t want to do. We are tickled PINK!!!

Daily Dose

Treating Bee Stings

Bee stings are a right of passage during childhood, always memorable, but never fun.I was outside today and noticed that the bees are back, pollinating the flowers in my garden, but ready to sting too if they are crossed by bare feet or errant hands. Bee stings are a right of passage during childhood, always memorable, but never fun. Our office receives numerous calls about how to handle a bee sting. First thing is to get some ice or a cool compress on the sting, which relives both PAIN and swelling.

While the ice is working you can take a peek and see if the stinger is still in the skin, and if so do not go grab tweezers or your fingernails to try and remove the stinger. If you do that you will only make the sting worse. The best way to remove the stinger is by using the edge of a credit card to gently scrape the stinger out of the skin. Honey Bees leave behind their stinger while wasps and hornets do not. Unless the child is allergic to bee stings most people will only have a local reaction. If there are any symptoms associated with the sting such as swelling of face, mouth, lips, or difficulty swallowing or breathing, give an immediate dose of Benadryl (diphenhydramine) while calling 911. If the child has a known bee hypersensitivity and they have an epi pen you will need to use it and also call 911. For local reactions after the sting is cleaned you can apply calamine lotion or a topical steroid cream. For swelling and discomfort a dose of Benadryl is also recommended, as well as a pain reliever like ibuprofen which will also relieve local inflammation along with pain relief. The sting is usually not uncomfortable for more than 24 hours. Make sure to watch for signs of infection with increasing redness, streaking or pain at the site of the sting. If the area seems to be getting worse rather than better it is a good idea to let you pediatrician take a peek. That's your daily dose for today, we'll chat again tomorrow.

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