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Can Prenatal Supplements Reduce Baby’s Risk of Autism?

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According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 1 in 68 U.S. children have been identified with autism spectrum disorder.  

While there is no one cause attributed to the developmental disability, a new study suggests that taking folic acid and multivitamins during pregnancy may reduce your child's risk of developing autism.

 “Reduced risk of [autism] in offspring is a consideration for public health policy that may be realized by extended use of folic acid and multivitamin supplements during pregnancy," the researchers concluded in the report.

The international team of scientists, led by Stephen Levine from the University of Haifa in Israel, gathered data on tens of thousands of children born in Israel between 2003 and 2007, and followed their progress until 2015.

Researchers gathered prescription data, to see whether the kids' mothers had been prescribed folic acid or multivitamin supplements either prior to or during pregnancy.

Results showed that women who took supplements prior to pregnancy were 61 percent less likely to have a child diagnosed with autism, compared with moms who didn't take supplements.

In addition, taking supplements during pregnancy was linked to a 73 percent reduced risk of an autism diagnosis, the findings showed.

These study results indicate that taking folic acid and multivitamins could be a way to protect babies against the development of autism, said Tom Frazier, chief science officer for Autism Speaks, a group that promotes advocacy and support for individuals with autism and their families.

"The study suggests this is not a trivial recommendation. This is something that people really should pay attention to," Frazier said. "The reduction in risk isn't huge, but it isn't small either."

Pregnant women are advised to take folic acid to prevent abnormal fetal neural development. A lack of the vitamin could possibly set the stage for later onset of autism, Frazier said. He's not sure how the protective effect of multivitamins might work.

The study is not without its’ critics. The study cannot prove a direct cause-and-effect link between supplements and autism due to its design, and suffers from some major limitations, said Dr. Ruth Milanaik, director of the neonatal neurodevelopmental follow-up program at Cohen Children's Medical Center, in New Hyde Park, N.Y.

"I don't have a problem with saying folic acid is good for pregnant women. You should not only take folic acid during pregnancy, you should also take folic acid before pregnancy," Milanaik said. "But this study does not show that [not taking supplements] is a cause of autism in any way, shape or form."

Prescription records can't show whether women follow through and take their supplements, she said. Supplements also are available over-the-counter, and some of the moms could have purchased and taken them without waiting for a prescription, Milanaik notes.

The study was published online in January, in the journal JAMA Psychiatry.

Story source: Dennis Thompson, https://consumer.healthday.com/cognitive-health-information-26/autism-news-51/prenatal-vitamins-tied-to-lower-autism-risk-in-kids-study-finds-729864.html

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